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THE  COLLECTED  WORKS  OF 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

THE  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN  ASSOCIATION 
SPRINGFIELD,  ILLINOIS 

VII 

ROY  P.  BASLER,  EDITOR 

MARION   DOLORES   PRATT   AND   LLOYD   A.    DUNLAP 
ASSISTANT   EDITORS 


RUTGERS    UNIVERSITY>  P.KE3.8   - 
NEW   BRUNSWICK,    NEVV.:J-ERSEY 
1953    'V/-' 


COPYRIGHT,    1953?  BY 
THE  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN  ASSOCIATION 


'*••    t     =  ;•      *      '- 

~:&tAFUFACTURED;ifr'.THE  UNITED  STATES  OF  AMERICA 
BY  H.  WOLFF  BOOK  MANJJ'FACTURING  COMPANY,  INC.,  NEW  YOKK 


SOURCES 
AND    LOCATION    SYMBOLS 


ST 


r 


DESCRIPTION    OF    SOURCES 

THE  following  symbols  provide  a  description  of  sources  as  cited  at 
the  beginning  of  the  first  footnote  to  each  item.  In  addition  to  the 
customary  symbols  for  describing  manuscripts,  the  editors  have 
employed  symbols  or  single  words  to  identify  other  sources  which 
have  been  cited  repeatedly  in  the  first  footnote. 

AD  Autograph  Document 

ADS  Autograph  Document  Signed 

ADf  Autograph  Draft 

ADf S  Autograph  Draft  Signed 

AE  Autograph  Endorsement 

AES  Autograph  Endorsement  Signed 

AL  Autograph  Letter 

ALS  Autograph  Letter  Signed 

ALS  copy     Autograph  Letter  Signed,  copied  by  Lincoln  and  pre- 
served in  his  papers 

Copy  Copy  not  by  Lincoln 

D  Document 

DS  Document  Signed 

Df  Draft 

DfS  Draft  Signed 

KS  Endorsement  Signed 

F  Facsimile — following  any  of  the  preceding  symbols 

LS  Letter  Signed 

P  Photostat — following  any  of  the  preceding  symbols 

Anglo  New  Letters  and  Papers  of  Lincoln.  Compiled  by  Paul 

M.  Angle.  Boston  and  New  York:  Houghton  Mifflin 

Company,  1930. 
Horndon       Hcrndon's  Lincoln:  The  True  Story  of  a  Great  Life.  By 

William  H.  Herndon  and  Jesse  W.  Weik.  3  volumes. 

Chicago,  New  York,  and  San  Francisco:  Belford,  Clarke 

&  Company,  [1889]. 
Ilortz  Abraham  Lincoln:  A  New  Portrait.  By  Emanuel  Hertz. 

2  volumes.  New  York:  Horace  Liveright,  Inc.,  1931- 
Lapsley         The  Writings  of  Abraham  Lincoln.  Edited  by  Arthur 

Brooks  Lapsley.  8  volumes.  New  York:  P.  F.  Collier  and 

Son,  1905. 

[v]      4.45075 


NH 


OR 


Tarbell 

Tracy 

Wilson 


CCamStJ 
CLCM 

CSmH 

CoHi 

CoU 

Ct 

CtHi 

CtLHi 

CtSoP 

CtWat 

CtY 

DLC 

DLC-HW 

DLC-RTL 

DLM 
DNA 


DNM 


S  OTJ  ROES 

Complete  Works  of  Abraham  Lincoln.  Edited  by  John 

G.  Nicolay  and  John  Hay.   12  volumes.  New  York: 

Francis  D.  Tandy  Company,  1905. 

The  War  of  the  Rebellion:  A  Compilation  of  the  Official 

Records  of  the  Union  and  Confederate  Armies.  4  series; 

70  "volumes";   128  books.  Washington:    Government 

Printing  Office,  1880-1901.  Roman  numerals  are  xised 

for  Series,.  Volume,  and  Part  (if  any) ;  pages  are  in 

arabic. 

The  Life  of  Abraham  Lincoln.  .  .  .  By  Ida  M.  Tarbell. 

a  volumes.  New  York:    The  Doubleday  &  McClure 

Company,  1900. 

Uncollected  Letters  of  Abraham  Lincoln.  Edited  by 

Gilbert  A.  Tracy.  Boston  and  New  York:   Houghton 

Mifflin  Company,  1917- 

Uncollected  Works  of  Abraham  Lincoln.  Edited  by  Ru- 

fus  Rockwell  Wilson.  2  volumes.  Elmira,  New  York: 

Primavera  Press,  1947-1948. 

LOCATION   SYMBOLS 

St.  John's  Seminary  Library,  Camarillo,  Calif. 
Los  Angeles  County  Museum  Library,  Los  Angeles, 
Calif. 

Henry  E.  Huntington  Library,  San  Marino,  Calif. 
State  Historical  Society  of  Colorado,  Denver,  Colo. 
University  of  Colorado  Library,  Boulder,  Colo. 
Connecticut  State  Library,  Hartford,  Conn. 
Connecticut  Historical  Society,  Hartford,  Conn. 
Litchfield  Historical  Society,  Litchfield,  Conn. 
Pequot  Library,  Southport,  Conn. 
Watertown  Library  Association,  Watertown,  Conn. 
Yale  University  Library,  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Library  of  Congress,  Washington,  D.  C. 
Herndon-Weik  Collection,  Library  of  Congress 
The  Robert  Todd  Lincoln  Collection  of  the  Papers  of 
Abraham  Lincoln,  Library  of  Congress 
Lincoln  Museum,  Ford's  Theatre,  National  Park  Serv- 
ice, Washington,  D.  C. 

National  Archives,  Washington,  D.  C.  All  additional 
abbreviations  and  numbers  given  with  this  symbol  are 
those  employed  by  the  National  Archives  at  the  time 
the  manuscript  was  located. 
National  Museum  Library,  Washington,  D.  C. 

[vi] 


SOURCES 

DeHi  Historical  Society  of  Delaware  Library,  Wilmington, 

Del. 

DeWI  Wilmington  Institute  Free  Library,  Wilmington,  Del. 

I-Ar  Archives  Division,  Illinois  State  Library,  Springfield. 

111. 

IBloHi  McLean  County  Historical  Society,  Bloominglon,  111. 

ICHi  Chicago  Historical  Society,  Chicago,  111. 

ICU  University  of  Chicago  Library,  Chicago,  111. 

IDecJ  James  Millikin  University  Library,  Decatur,  111. 

IFre  Freeport  Public  Library,  Freeport,  111. 

IHi  Illinois  State  Historical  Library,  Springfield,  111. 

LTI  Illinois  College  Library,  Jacksonville,  111. 

ISLA  The  Abraham  Lincoln  Association,  Springfield,  111. 

IU  University  of  Illinois  Library,  Urbana,  111. 

laCrM  Iowa  Masonic  Library,  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa 

laDaM  Davenport  Public  Museum,  Davenport,  Iowa 

laHA  Iowa  State  Department  of  History  and  Archives,  Des 

Moines,  Iowa 

In  Indiana  State  Library,  Indianapolis,  Ind. 

InFtwL  Lincoln  National  Life  Foundation,  Fort  Wayne,  Ind. 

InHi  Indiana  Historical  Society,  Indianapolis,  Ind. 

InLTHi  Tippecanoe  County  Historical  Association,  Lafayette, 

Ind. 

InU  Indiana  University  Library,  Bloomington,  Ind. 

KyBC  Berea  College  Library,  Berea,  Ky. 

KyU  University  of  Kentucky  Library,  Lexington,  Ky. 

LU  Louisiana  State  University  Library,  Baton  Rouge,  La. 

MB  Boston  Public  Library,  Boston,  Mass. 

MCon  Free  Public  Library,  Concord,  Mass. 

MFai  Millicont  Library,  Fairhaven,  Mass. 

MH  Harvard  University  Library,  Cambridge,  Mass. 

MHi  Massachusetts  Historical  Society,  Boston,  Mass. 

MS  Springfield  Library  Association,  Springfield,  Mass. 

MSHi  Connecticut    Valley    Historical    Society,    Springfield, 

Mass. 

MdAA  Hall  of  Records,  State  of  Maryland,  Annapolis,  Md. 

MdHi  Maryland  Historical  Society,  Baltimore,  Md. 

MeHi  Maine  Historical  Society,  Portland,  Me. 

MiD  Detroit  Public  Library,  Detroit,  Mich. 

MiK-M  Kalamazoo  Public  Library  Museum,  Kalamazoo.  Mich. 

MiU-C  William  L.  Clements  Library,  University  of  Michigan. 

Ann  Arbor,  Mich. 

[vii] 


SOURCES 

Michigan  Historical  Collection,  University  of   Mich- 
lean,  Ann  Arbor,  Mich. 

Minnesota  Historical  Society,  St.  Paul,  Minn. 
Macalester  College  Library,  St.  Paul,  Minn. 
State  Historical  Society  of  Missouri,  Columbia.  Mo. 
Missouri  Historical  Society,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 
New  York  State  Library,  Albany,  N.  Y. 
Fred  L.  Emerson  Foundation,  Auburn,  N.  Y. 
Long  Island  Historical  Society,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Grosvenor  Library,  Buffalo,  New  York 
Buffalo  Historical  Society,  Buffalo,  N,  Y. 
Southworth  Library,  Dryden,  N.  Y. 
New-York  Historical  Society,  New  York  City 
Cornell  University  Library,  Ithaca,  N.  Y. 
New  York  Public  Library,  New  York  City 
Columbia  University  Library,  New  York  City 
Pierpont  Morgan  Library,  New  York  City 
University  of  Rochester  Library,  Rochester,  N.  Y. 
John  Jermain  Memorial  Library,  Sag  Harbor,  N.  Y. 
Skaneateles  Library  Association,  Skaneatelos,  N.  Y. 
TL  S.  Military  Academy  Library,  West  Point,  N.  Y. 
Omaha  Public  Library,  Omaha,  Nebr. 
Guilford  College  Library,  Guilford,  N.  C. 
Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  Exeter,  N.  H. 
Princeton  University  Library,  Princeton,  N.  J. 
Historical  and  Philosophical  Society  of  Ohio,   Cincin- 
nati, Ohio 

Case  Institute  of  Technology,  Cleveland.  Ohio 
Western  Reserve  Historical  Society,  Cleveland,  Ohio 
Hayes  Memorial  Library,  Fremont,  Ohio 
Marietta  College  Library,  Marietta,  Ohio 
Oliver  R.  Barrett  Collection,  Chicago,  111.* 
Clark  County  Historical  Society,  Springfield,  Ohio 
Oregon  Historical  Society,  Portland,  Ore. 
Haverford  College  Library,  Haverf ord.  Pa. 
Historical  Society  of  Pennsylvania,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

*  After  the  Collected  Works  was  in  press,  the  collection  of  the  Inte  Oliver  H 
Barrett  was  sold  at  auction  by  Parke-Bernet  Galleries  (Catalog  131.-)  on  I-Vl, 
ruary  19-30,  1952.  It  has  been  impossible  to  trace  all  new  owners  of  the  m»r,* 

fc^hi^rt1^'^  mPrac'ic?ble  to  change  the  source  citations   for 
those  which  are  known,  but  many  of  the  more  important  items  went  to  sm  h 

[viii] 


MiU-HL 

MnHi 

MnSM 

Moffi 

MoSHi 

N 

NAuE 

NBLiHi 

NBuG 

NBuHi 

NDry 

NHi 

NIC 

NN 

NNC 

NNP 

HRU 

NSh 

NSk 

NWM 

NbO 

NcGu 

NhExP 


OCHP 

OC1CS 

OClWHi 

OFH 

OMC 

ORB 

OSffi 

OrHi 

PHC 

PHi 


SOURCES 

PMA  Allegheny  College  Library,  Meadville,  Pa. 

PP  Free  Library  of  Philadelphia,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

PPDrop  Dropsie  College  Library,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

PSt  Pennsylvania  State  College  Library,  State  College,  Pa. 

PU  University  of  Pennsylvania  Library,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

RPAB  Annmary  Brown  Memorial  Library,  Providence,  R.  I. 

RPB  Brown  University  Library,  Providence,  R.  I. 

THaroL  Lincoln  Memorial  University,  Harrogate,  Tenn. 

THi  Tennessee  Historical  Society,  Nashville,  Tenn. 

ViU  University  of  Virginia  Library,  Charlottesville,  Va. 

VtU  University  of  Vermont  Library,  Burlington,  Vt. 

WBeloHi  Beloit  Historical  Society,  Beloit,  Wis. 

WHi  State  Historical  Society  of  Wisconsin,  Madison,  Wis. 

WvU  West  Virginia  University  Library,  Morgantown,  W 
Va. 


[ix] 


NOVEMBER  15,  1863 
By  Alexander  (lardner 


THE  COLLECTED  WORKS  OF 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 


To  Nathaniel  E  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Banks  Washington,  Nov.  5.  1863. 

Three  months  ago  to-day  I  wrote  you  about  Louisiana  affairs, 
stating,  on  the  word  of  Gov.  Shepley,  as  I  understood  him,  that  Mr. 
Durant  was  taking  a  registry  of  citizens,  preparatory  to  the  elec- 
tion of  a  constitutional  convention  for  that  State.  I  sent  a  copy  of 
the  letter  to  Mr.  Durant;  and  I  now  have  his  letter,  written  two 
months  after,  acknowledging  receipt,  and  saying  he  is  not  taking 
such  registry;  and  he  does  not  let  me  know  that  he  personally  is 
expecting  to  do  so.  Mr.  Flanders,  to  whom  I  also  sent  a  copy,  is 
now  here,  and  he  says  nothing  has  yet  been  done.  This  disappoints 
me  bitterly;  yet  I  do  not  throw  blame  on  you  or  on  them.  I  do  how- 
ever, urge  both  you  and  them,  to  lose  no  more  time.  Gov.  Shepley 
has  special  instructions  from  the  War  Department.  I  wish  him — 
these  gentlemen  and  others  co-operating — without  waiting  for  more 
territory,  to  go  to  work  and  give  me  a  tangible  nucleus  which  the 
remainder  of  the  State  may  rally  around  as  fast  as  it  can,  and 
which  I  can  at  once  recognize  and  sustain  as  the  true  State  gov- 
ernment. And  in  that  work  I  wish  you,  and  all  under  your  com- 
mand, to  give  them  a  hearty  sympathy  and  support.  The  instruc- 
tion to  Gov.  Shepley  bases  the  movement  (and  rightfully  too)  upon 
the  loyal  element.  Time  is  important.  There  is  danger,  even  now, 
that  the  adverse  element  seeks  insidiously  to  pre-occupy  the 
ground.  If  a  few  professedly  loyal  men  shall  draw  the  disloyal 
about  them,  and  colorably  set  up  a  State  government,  repudiating 
the  emancipation  proclamation,  and  re-establishing  slavery,  I  can 
not  recognize  or  sustain  their  work.  I  should  fall  powerless  in  the 
attempt.  This  government,  in  such  an  attitude,  would  be  a  house 
divided  against  itself.  I  have  said,  and  say  again,  that  if  a  new  State 
government,  acting  in  harmony  with  this  government,  and  con- 
sistently with  general  freedom,  shall  think  best  to  adopt  a  reason- 
able temporary  arrangement,  in  relation  to  the  landless  and  home- 
less freed  people.  I  do  not  object;  but  my  word  is  out  to  be  for  and 

en 


NOVEMBER      5,      1863 

not  against  them  on  the  question  of  their  permanent  freedom.  I  do 
not  insist  upon  such  temporary  arrangement,  but  only  say  such 
would  not  be  objectionable  to  me.  Yours  very  truly 

A.  LINCOI-TST. 

i  ALS,  CSmH.  See  Lincoln  to  Banks,  August  5,  supra.  On  October  i  Thomas 
J.  Durant  wrote  Lincoln  that,  "By  your  letter  to  General  Banks,  you  tippoar  to 
tfrfnV  that  a  Registration  of  voters  is  going  on  under  my  superintendence,  with 
the  view  of  bringing  on  the  election  of  delegates  to  a  Constitutional  Convention; 
but  such  is  not  the  case.  The  means  of  communicating  with  a  largo  portion  of 
the  state,  are  not  in  our  power,  and  before  the  commencement  of  a  Registration 
we  ought  to  have  undisturbed  control  of  a  considerable  territory,  at  least  the 
two  congressional  districts  proclaimed  as  not  being  in  rebellion.  .  .  ."  (Knrlosed 
with  Durant  to  Stanton,  October  5,  1863,  DLC-RTL), 

On  December  11  Benjamin  F.  Flanders  wrote: 

"I  have  shown  the  copy,  which  you  permitted  me  to  take,  of  your  letter  to 
General  Banks,  to  Mr.  Durant  Mr.  Hahn,  Judge  Whitakor  and  a  few  others 
of  our  prominent  union  men,  and  it  gives  to  all  of  them  great  encouragement 
and  satisfaction. 

"The  letter  has  had  the  desired  effect  upon  the  Military  loaders;  they  are 
stimulated  to  action  by  it. 

"There  is  now,  and  I  believe  there  will  continue  to  be  a  commendable  zeal 
and  entire  unity  of  action  among  the  friends  of  the  Government  and  its  officers 
civil  &  military  in  the  movement  to  form  a  State,  a  free  State  government  for 
Louisiana.  The  measures  taken  for  this  great  object  will  I  think  be  stamped 
with  prudence,  and  we  hope  their  result  will  meet  your  expectations."  (DLG- 
RTL). 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Execution  suspended  till  further  orders, 

Nov.  5.  1863  A.  LINCOLN 

1 AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,   MM    1061.   Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  a  telegram  from  Andrew  G.  Curtin,   November  ^,, 
1863,  asking  respite  for  Samuel  Wellers.  See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  November    * 
infra. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  Executive  Mansion. 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington,  B.C.,  November  5.  1 863. 

Please  suspend  the  execution  of  Samuel  Wellers,  Forty-ninth 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  until  further  orders.  A. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  398.  See  Lincoln  to  Holt,  supra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Let  private  Noble  be  discharged.          A.  LINCOLN 
Nov.  6.  1863. 

Carl  ToUefsen' Brookiyn' New  Y°rk-  privat° 

[2] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If  Gen.  Whipple  is  entitled  to  have  an  Assistant  Adjutant  General 
appointed,  let  the  appointment  be  made  as  within  requested. 
Nov.  6.  1863  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  of  Brigadier  Gen- 
eral William  D.  Whipple,  Pottsville,  Pennsylvania,  October  2,  1863,  to  Adjutant 
General  Lorenzo  Thomas,  requesting  that  Second  Lieutenant  Robert  H.  Ramsey, 
Forty-fifth  Pennsylvania  Militia,  be  appointed  assistant  adjutant  general  of  Vol- 
unteers with  the  rank  of  captain.  Ramsey  was  appointed  on  December  5,  1863, 
and  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  February  29,  1864. 

To  Isaac  R.  Diller1 

Capt.  Isaac  R.  Diller  Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Sir:  Washington,  Nov.  7,  1863. 

I  must  decline  to  take  charge  of  Dr.  Wetherell's  interests.  If  he 
presents  a  claim  to  congress,  or  the  court  of  Claims,  I  shall  be  ready 
to  testify  the  whole  truth,  so  far  as  within  my  knowledge.  As  to  my 
ordering  him  back  to  the  Agricultural  Department,  and  fixing  his 
Salary  as  you  and  he  may  think  right,  it  is  wholly  inadmissable. 
The  law  does  not  authorize  me  to  do  any  of  these  things  Yours 
truly  A,  LINCOLN 

1  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  See  note  to  Lincoln's  memorandum  of  November  2,  supra. 
On  November  4  Diller  wrote  Lincoln  from  Willard's  Hotel:  "I  find  that  my 
health  is  suffering  by  remaining  here,  and  I  beg  you  to  accept  this  as  my  ex- 
cuse for  troubling  you  with  this  letter. 

"It  is  important  that  I  should  be  placed  in  possession  of  the  views  of  Your 
Excellency  with  regard  to  this  powder  matter,  at  your  earliest  convenience,  in 
order  that  many  expenses,  such  as  the  rent  of  the  building  at  Westville,  N.J. 
the  services  of  a  watchman,  &c  <fec.  may  be  stopped.  There  is  plenty  of  powder 
already  made  to  test  its  merits  .  .  .  and  with  your  permission  will  join  my 
family  in  Illinois  and  there  await  the  result.  .  .  ."  Diller  continued  with  an 
expression  of  hope  that  Dr.  Charles  M.  Wetherill  would  not  "suffer  in  conse- 
quence" of  his  services  on  the  powder  project:  "Should  it  be  the  pleasure  of 
Your  Excellency  to  remand  him  to  the  Department  from  which  he  was  detailed, 
arid  he  is  now  in  this  City  awaiting  that  pleasure,  I  beg  that  the  Commissioner 
of  Agriculture  may  be  informed  of  your  wishes  in  regard  to  his  future  posi- 
tion. .  .  .  The  Commissioner  should  issue  to  Dr.  Wetherill,  a  salary  upon 
which  he  can  live  respectably  with  his  family  in  Washington.  .  .  ."  (DLC- 
RTL). 

Concerning  WetheriU's  dismissal  from  his  post  as  chief  chemist  of  the  Depart- 
ment of  Agriculture,  Representative-elect  Godlove  S.  Orth  of  Lafayette,  Indiana, 
wrote  Lincoln  on  October  16,  1863: 

"I  regret  to  learn  that  a  constituent  of  mine,  Dr.  C.  M.  Wetherill  'Chemist  of 
the  Dept.  of  Agriculture,'  has  received  from  the  Agricultural  Conir.  under  date 
of  Oct.  i,  a  rather  summary  dismissal  from  that  Department. 

"Dr.  W.  was  specially  detailed  by  your  order,  of  date  April  4,  '63,  for  30  days 
to  make  certain  experiments  in  Gunpowder,  which  detail  was  afterwards  on  the 
2nd.  day  of  May  extended  by  the  Comr.  'until  notified  to  the  contrary.' 

"Under  tliis  state  of  facts  Dr.  W.  and  his  friends  regard  the  action  of  the 

[3] 


NOVEMBER      7,      1863 

Commissioner  as  harsh  and  arbitrary  and  look  with  confidence  to  your   kind 
sense  of  Justice  to  see  that  Dr.  W.  is  not  thus  summarily  dealt  with.   .  .  . 


Apparenuy  Lincoln  took  some  sort  of  action,  for  a  contemporary  copy  of 
Isaac  Newton's  letter  to  Wetherill,  dated  "Novr.  1863"  reads  as  follows: 

"Your  salary  as  Chemist  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture  will  be  fixed  at 
the  rate  of  $2500  per  annum,  to  commence  from  November  ist.  of  the  current 

ye"l'will  grant  you  a  furlough  of  two  weeks  from  the  date  of  your  remand  to 
this  Department  for  the  purpose  of  bringing  your  family  from  the  West.  (Ul  A,- 
RTL). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

November  7,  1863 

Please  have  an  enquiry  made  at  once,  whether  Dr.  E.  Z.  Baird  may 
not  be  allowed  to  return  to  his  home  in  Mississippi. 

1  Copy,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  203,  Regis- 
ter notation.  The  copy  of  Lincoln's  note  preserved  in  the  register  indicates  re- 
ferral to  General  Robert  C.  Schenck. 

To  William  B.  Astor  and  Robert  B.  Roosevelt' 

William  B.  Astor  &  Robt.  B.  Rosevelt  Washington  Caty, 

New-York  Nov.  8  1863 

I  shall  be  happy  to  give  the  interview  to  the  committee  as  you 
request.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Astor  and  Roosevelt  telegraphed  on  November  7  that  "a  com- 
mittee of  Merchants  &  citizens  of  New  York  ask  an  interview  with  the  President 
on  Monday  morning  ...  on  important  business,"  (DLC-RTIO-  Sen  I.iiicnlu 
to  Astor  and  Roosevelt,  November  9,  infra. 

To  Samuel  C.  Pomeroy1 

Private.  Executive  Department 

Hon.  S.  C.  Pomeroy  Washington  City 

My  dear  Sir:  Nov.  8th.  1 863 

I  have  examined  Killingworths  evidence  in  Capt.  Levy's  case, 
and  I  must  say  it  makes  too  bad  a  record  to  admit  of  my  intorfor- 
ence — in  fact,  it  could  not  be  worse.  In  the  nature  of  the  case,  K. 
alone,  of  all  competent  witnesses,  can  know  whether  Capt.  L's  hy- 
pothesis is  true  or  false;  and  he  most  fully  disproves  it.  Ho  fully 
proves  also  that  Capt.  L.  sought  to  have  him  testify  falsely.  To  in- 
terfere, under  the  circumstances,  would  blacken  my  own  character 
Yours  truly  A  Lmcoi,N 

1  ALS-P ,  ISLA.  No  correspondence  with  Pomeroy  in  regard  to  this  case  has 
been  located,  and  Killingworth  has  not  been  identified.  Captain  Chome  M.  Levy 

[4] 


NOVEMBER      Q,      1863 

of  New  York,  assistant  quartermaster  of  Volunteers,  convicted  of  signing  a  false 
certificate  relating  to  pay  of  men  under  his  command,  was  cashiered  on  October 
9,  1863  (AGO,  General  Orders  No.  332). 

To  John  J.  Astor,  Jr.,  and  Others1 

Private,  except  to  Gen.  Dix 

Executive  Mansion  Washington  DC.  Nov.  9.  1863 
Gentlemen  Upon  the  subject  of  your  letter  I  have  to  say  that 
it  is  beyond  my  province  to  interfere  with  New- York  City  politics; 
that  I  am  very  grateful  to  Gen.  Dix  for  the  zealous  and  able  Mili- 
tary, and  quasi  civil  support  he  has  given  the  government  during 
the  war;  and  that  if  the  people  of  New- York  should  tender  him 
the  Mayoralty,  and  he  accept  it,  nothing  on  that  subject  could  be 
more  satisfactory  to  me.  In  this  I  must  not  be  tmderstood  as  saying 
ought  against  any  one,  or  as  attempting  the  least  degree  of  dicta- 
tion in  the  matter.  To  state  it  in  another  way,  if  Gen.  Dix'  present 
relation  to  the  general  government  lays  any  restraint  upon  him  in 
this  matter,  I  wish  to  remove  that  restraint.  Yours  truly 

Messrs.  J.  J.  Astor,  Jr.  A.  LIISTCOUST 

R.  B.  Rosevelt 
Nathl  Sands. 

1  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  A  petition  bearing  twenty-one  signatures,  including  those 
of  the  men  addressed,  November  7,  1863,  reads  as  follows:  "The  undersigned 
representing  in  the  City  of  New  York  both  political  parties  have  offered  Gen 
Dix  the  nomination  for  Mayor  and  finding  some  hesitation  on  his  part  arising 
from  his  official  position  ask  President  Lincoln  in  view  of  the  great  national 
importance  of  the  matter  to  request  Gen.  Dix  to  accept  the  nomination."  (DLC- 
RTL). 

John  A.  Dix  wrote  Lincoln  on  November  10:  "Your  letter  in  regard  to  the 
Mayoralty  of  this  City  reached  me  after  I  had  declined  the  nomination.  There 
were  many  insurmountable  objections  of  a  personal  character  to  my  acceptance; 
but  I  was  also  of  the  opinion  that  I  could  be  more  useful  to  your  administration 
where  I  am,  and  many  of  your  most  discreet  friends  coincide  with  me.  I  did 
not  understand  your  letter  as  expressing  any  opinion  or  wish  on  the  subject,  but 
merely  as  an  intimation  that,  so  far  as  depended  on  you,  obstacles  would  be 
removed,  should  I  deem  an  acceptance  advisable.  If  I  could  have  a  few  minutes' 
conversation  with  you,  I  know  you  would  be  satisfied  that  my  decision  is  right. 
T  am  only  anxious  to  be  where  you  think  I  can  be  most  useful  to  the  coun- 
try. .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 

To  Ambrose  E.  Burnside1 

Major  Gen.  Burnside  Washington,  D.C., 

Knoxville,  Tenn.  Nov.  9.  1863. 

Have  seen  despatch  from  Gen.  Grant  about  your  loss  at  Rogers- 
ville.2  Per-contra,  about  the  same  time  Averell  &  Duffie  got  consid- 
erable advantage  of  the  enemy  at  and  about  Lewisburg  Va;3  and  on 

[5] 


NOVEMBER      Q,      ±863 

Saturday,  the  /th.  Meade  drove  the  enemy  from  Rappahannock- 
station,  and  Kellys-ford,  capturing  8  battle-flags,  four  guns,  and 
over  eighteen  hundred  prisoners,  with  very  little  loss  to  himself. 
Let  me  hear  from  you.  A-  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Burnside  replied  at  i  A.M.  on  November  12:  "Your  dispatch  ro- 
ceived.  The  Telegraph  lines  have  been  down  since  Saturday  night,  so  that  wo 
could  not  communicate  with  Genl  Grant.  Our  loss  at  Rogersville  was  about  five 
hundred  (500)  old  troops  and  one  hundred  &  fifty  (150)   new  troops,  tour  (4) 
pieces  of  artillery  and  thirty  six  (36)  wagons  with  all  the  baggage  &  ammuni- 
tion of  two  (2)  Regts  &  a  battery     the  principal  loss  was  in  the  Second  Ten- 
nessee mounted  Infantry.  The  Seventh  Ohio  Cavalry  lost  about  one   hundred 
(100)  men  &  Phillips  Illinois  Battery  about  forty  (40).  The  force  at  that  point 
consisted  of  these  two  (2)  Regts  &  the  Phillips  Battery  with  some  recruits  for 
a  new  Tennessee  Regt.  The  rebel  attacking  force  amounted  to  thirty  five  hun- 
dred  (3500)   mounted  men  under  Gen  Sam  Jones.  They   captured   about  six 
hundred  horses  &  equipment  &  as  many  stand  of  small  arms.  An  investigation 
is  being  made  as  to  the  cause  of  defeat.  I  at  first  thought  it  was  the  result  of 
carelessness  on  the  part  of  the  Comdg  Officer  Col  Garrard  &  want  of  steadiness 
on  the  part  of  the  men  but  as  the  Investigation  progresses  I  nm  becoming  satis- 
fied that  it  is  result  of  the  necessity  for  holding  so  long  a   line  between   two 
formidable  forces  of  the  Enemy.   It  seems  to  be   impossible   to   be   sufficiently 
watchful  to  prevent  trouble  when  so  many  points  are  assailable.  We  \vere  hoi  fl- 
ing the  line  from  Washn.  on  the  Tenn.  River  to  the  Watnxign.   The   troops  of 
this  command  have  behaved  so  well  that  I  shall  be  glad  to  find  that  no  one 
was  censurable  for  the  defeat.  I  send  you  a  cipher  dispatch.  We  were  all   re- 
joiced to  hear  of  the   Successes  in  Western  Virginia  &   in   the   Army    of   the 
Potomac."  (DLC-RTL). 

2  This  sentence  was  revised  by  Lincoln.  He  originally  wrote:  "Have  just  seen 
your  despatch  to  Mrs.  B.  about  your  loss  at  Rogersville.  Hnd  before  seen  sub- 
stantially the  same  in  a  despatch  from  Gen,  Grant."  The  despatch  to  "Mrs,  B." 
has  not  been  found,  but  Grant's  despatch  to  Halleck  of  1:30  P.M.,  November  7, 
is  printed  in  the  Official  Records  (I,  XXXI,  III,  74). 

*  William  W.  Averell  and  Alfred  N.  Duffle. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Flanders1 

Hon.  B.  F.  Flanders  Executive  Mansion 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  B.C.  Nov.  9.  18(13 

In  a  conversation  with  Gen.  Butler  he  made  a  suggestion  which 
impressed  me  a  good  deal  at  the  time.  It  was  that,  as  a  preliminary 
step,  a  vote  be  taken,  yea  or  nay,  whether  there  shall  be  a  State 
convention  to  repeal  the  Ordinance  of  secession,  and  remodel  the 
State  constitution.  I  send  it  merely  as  a  suggestion  for  your  con- 
sideration, not  having  considered  it  maturely  myself.  The  point 
which  impressed  me  was,  not  so  much  the  questions  to  be  voted 
on,  as  the  effect  of  chrystallizing,  so  to  speak,  in  taking  such  popu- 
lar vote  on  any  proper  question.  In  fact,  I  have  always  thought  the 
act  of  secession  is  legally  nothing,  and  needs  no  repealing.  Turn  the 
thought  over  in  your  mind,  and  see  if  in  your  own  judgment,  you 
can  make  any  thing  of  it.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

[6] 


NOVEMBER      9,       1863 

1  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  No  specific  reply  from  Flanders  has  been  discovered,  but 
see  the  noto  to  Lincoln's  letter  to  Banks,  November  5,  supra,  for  the  text  of 
Flanders'  letter  of  December  11,  1863. 

To  Stephen  T.  Logan1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Dear  Judge  Washington,  Nov.  9,  1863. 

Col.  Lanion  had  made  his  calculation,  as  he  tells  me,  to  go  to 
Illinois  and  bring  Mrs.  L.  home  this  month,  when  he  was  called  on 
to  act  as  Marshal  on  the  occasion  of  dedicating  the  Cemetery  at 
Gettysburg  Pa  on  the  igth.  He  came  to  me,  and  I  told  him  I 
thought  that  in  view  of  his  relation  to  the  government  and  to  me, 
he  could  not  well  decline.  Now,  why  would  it  not  be  pleasant  for 
you  to  come  on  with  Mrs.  L.  at  that  time?  It  will  be  an  interesting 
ceremony,  and  I  shall  be  very  glad  to  see  you.  I  know  not  whether 
you  would  care  to  remain  to  the  meeting  of  congress,  but  that 
event,  as  you  know,  will  be  very  near  at  hand.  Your  friend  as  ever 

A.   LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Mrs.  Logan  Hay,  Springfield,  Illinois.  No  reply  has  been 
found.  Stephen  T.  Logan  was  Ward  H.  Lamon's  father-in-law. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Washington, 
Major-General  Meade:  November  9,  1863—  7.30  p.m. 

I  have  seen  your  dispatches  about  operations  on  the  Rappahan- 
nock  on  Saturday.,  and  I  wish  to  say,  "Well  done."  Do  the  1,500 
prisoners  reported  by  General  Sedgwick  include  the  400  taken  by 
General  French,  or  do  the  whole  amount  to  1,900? 

A.   LINCOLN". 

1  OR,  I,  XXIX,  II,  443.  No  reply  has  been  located.  Meade's  telegram  to  Hal- 
leek  of  8  P.M.,  November  8  stated  that  "Major-General  Sedgwick  reports  offi- 
cially the  capture  of  ...  over  1,500  prisoners.  Major-General  French  took 
over  400  prisoners  .  .  ."  (Ibid.,  p.  435).  Official  figures  for  Confederate  losses 
to  Seclgwick  at  Rappahannock  Station  on  November  7  were  1674  lost,  captured 
and  missing;  at  Kelly's  Ford,  Confederate  losses  to  French  were  359  captured 
and  missing. 

To  John  E.  Mulford1 

Major  Mulford  Washington,  D.C., 

Fort  Monroe  Nov.  gth  1863 

Let  Mrs.  Clark  go  with  Mrs.  Todd          A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  "9 th"  and  "Fort  Monroe"  are  not  in  Lincoln's  handwriting.  See 
Lincoln  to  Todd,  October  15,  supra.  "Mrs.  Clark"  was  probably  Mrs.  Abraham 

[7] 


NOVEMBER      1  O,      ±863 

Lincoln,  who  is  known  to  have  used  the  name  "Mrs.  Clarke"  in  later  years 
wb^  she  wished  to  travel  incognito  (see  Carl  Sandburg  and  Paul  M.  Angle, 
Mary  Lincoln,  Wife  and  Widow,  pp.  263,  275). 

Order  Concerning  Export  of  Tobacco1 

Executive  Mansion,  Nov.  10,  1863. 

In  consideration  of  peculiar  circumstances,  and  pursuant  to  the 
comity  deemed  to  be  due  to  friendly  Powers,  any  tobacco  in  the 
United  States,  belonging  to  the  Government  either  of  France,  Aus- 
tria, or  any  other  State  with  which  this  country  is  at  peace,  and 
which  tobacco  was  purchased  and  paid  for  by  such  Government 
prior  to  the  4th  day  of  March,  1861,  may  be  exported  from  any 
port  of  the  United  States,  under  the  supervision  and  upon  the  re- 
sponsibility of  naval  officers  of  such  Governments,  and  in  con- 
formity to  such  regulations  as  may  be  prescribed  by  the  Secretary 
of  State  of  the  United  States,  and  not  otherwise. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN". 

i  New  York  Times,  January  20,  1864.  No  official  copy  or  original  document 
has  been  located  for  this  order. 

To  John  M.  Schofield1 

Gen.  Schofield  Washington,  D.G., 

St.  Louis,  Mo.  Nov.  10.  iBfi-* 

I  see  a  despatch  here  from  St.  Louis  which  is  a  little  difficult  for 
me  to  understand.  It  says  "Gen.  Schofield  has  refused  leave  of  ab- 
sence to  members  in  Military  service  to  attend  the  Legislature.  All 
such  are  radical  and  Administration  men.  The  election  of  two 
Senators  from  this  place  on  Thursday  will  probably  turn  upon  this 
thing" 

What  does  this  mean?  O£  course  members  of  the  Legislature 
must  be  allowed  to  attend  it's  sessions.  But  how  is  there  a  session 
before  the  recent  election  returns  are  in?  And  how  is  it  to  be  at 
"this  place"  —  that  is  —  St  Louis?  Please  inform  me. 

A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  General  Schofield  replied  the  same  day,  "The  legislature  moots 
at  Jefferson  City  today.  The  recent  election  was  not  for  members  of  the  legis- 
lature except  perhaps  to  fill  vacancies.  I  have  not  authority  to  grant  leaves  of 
absence  to  officers  except  in  case  of  sickness.  The  orders  of  the  War  Dept.  ex- 
pressly forbid  it.  I  have  informed  members  of  the  Legislature  who  are  in  th<» 
Military  service  that  I  will  accept  their  resignations  to  enable  them  to  attend 
the  session  of  the  Legislature.  There  are  but  few  of  them  &  they  are  about 
equally  divided  between  radicalls  &  conservatives.  If  authorized  to  do  so  I  will 
grant  the  leaves  of  absence  long  enough  to  elect  senators  but  I  would  not  think 
it  proper  for  them  to  be  absent  all  winter  and  still  retain  their  commissions  in 
the  army."  (DLC-RTL).  See  Lincoln  to  Schofield,  November  it,  infra. 

[8] 


To  Hiram  Barney1 

Hon.  Hiram  Barney  Executive  Mansion 

New- York.  Washington,  D.C.  Nov.  11.  1863 

I  would  like  an  interview  with  you.  Can  you  not  come? 

A.    LlNCOUNT 

1  ALS,  HPIJ.  Charles  P.  Clinch,  assistant  collector  of  customs,  replied  at  1:30 
P.M.,  "Mr  Barney  had  left  for  Washington  before  the  receipt  of  your  message" 
(DLC-HTL). 

To  Montgomery  Blair1 

Hon.  M.  Blair  Executive  Mansion  Washington  D.C. 

My  dear  Sir  Nov.  11.  1863 

Mr.  Crisfield's  letter  which  you  inclose,  is  received.  Let  Mr.  S.2 
procure  the  sworn  statement  of  the  election  judges  at  any  voting 
place,  as  to  what  may  be  deemed  the  misconduct  of  any  military 
officer,  and  present  it  to  me,  and  I  will  call  any  such  officer  to  ac- 
count who  shall  by  such  statement  appear  to  have  violated,  or 
transcended  his  orders.  Yours  truly  A  LINCOLIST 

1  ADfS,  DI-C-HTL.  The  letter  from  defeated  congressman  John  M.  Crisfield, 
November  8,  1863,  enclosed  by  Blair  with  a  note  dated  November  11,  is  as  fol- 
lows: 

"Order  No  53  of  Geri.  Schenck  is  already  known  to  you.  In  obedience  to  that 
order,  large  bodies  of  troops  were  moved  into  this  Congressional  District  on 
Monday  last;  and  between  that  and  Wednesday  morning,  the  day  of  the  elec- 
tion, they  were  distributed  to  all  the  voting  places,  whore  they  remained  during 
the  day,  watching  arid  interfering  with  the  election. 

tlln  my  own  County,  (Somerset),  some  two  or  three  hundred  cavalry,  fully 
armed,  with  carbines,  swords,  &>  pistols,  and  well  mounted,  were  marched 
through  various  parts  of  the  County  oil  Tuesday;  and  at  the  hour  of  opening 
the  polls  on  Wednesday  morning,  they  were  found  at  each  voting  place,  in 
squads,  numbering  from  5  to  30  each.  They  at  once  took  control  of  the  election, 
arid  had  it  all  their  own  way.  ...  in  the  Union  districts,  where  I  was  supposed 
to  be  strong,  their  control  was  exercised  in  the  most  absolute  way.  In  one 
Election  District,  (Tangier),  the  officer  pulled  from  his  pocket  a  yellow,  or 
Cresswell  [John  A.  J.  Creswell]  ticket,  and  said  that  no  other  was  to  be  voted 
there  .  .  .  and  every  man  approaching  the  polls,  with  any  other  ticket,  was 
turned  back  by  an  armed  force.  ...  In  ...  other  districts  .  .  .  the  same 
thing  was  done  .  .  .  many  persons  who  offered  to  take  the  oath  prescribed  by 
Order  No.  53,  and  were  legally  qualified  voters,  were  turned  down.  ...  In 
.  .  .  Hungary  Neck,  the  officer  in  command  at  the  opening  of  the  Polls,  ordered 
every  ticket  to  be  examined,  before  it  was  put  into  the  box;  and  if  it  had  my 
name  on  it,  the  voter  was  required  to  take  the  oath  before  the  ballot  could  go 
in.  ...  The  consequence  was,  not  over  50  pr.  ct.  of  the  vote  of  the  District 
was  cast.  ...  In  this  election  District  (Princess  Anne)  the  polls  were  sur- 
rounded by  the  cavalry  dismounted,  and  armed  as  stated;  and  each  voter  was 
obliged  to  come  up,  one  at  a  time,  through  files  of  soldiers,  to  the  box,  where 
stood  the  commanding  officer,  (Capt  [Charles  C.]  Moore  3rd  Md.  Cavalry) 
challenging  each  as  he  came  up,  and  requiring  oath  to  be  administered  to  him, 
before  the  vote  was  received.  One  vote  was  so  received;  when  the  next  came 

[9] 


NOVEMBER      11,      1863 

up,  who  happened  to  be  my  son,  the  Captain  challenged  him,  and  before  the 
oath  was  put  to  him,  commenced  a  series  of  questions  as  to  his  loyalty,  mid  po- 
litical opinions,  the  means  of  suppressing  the  rebellion,  his  willingness  to  give 
up  all  his  property  to  put  down  the  rebellion,  &c.  and  when  he  had  got  through, 
he  turned  to  the  judges,  and  ordered  the  oath  to  be  administered.  At  this  point 
the  judges  said,  'we  do  not  approve  of  this  mode  of  conducting  the  election  —  , 
we  must  adhere  to  the  laws  of  the  state;  and  if  we  are  not  permitted  to  do 
so,  we  submit  to  arrest.'  (The  Capt  had  previously  told  them  that  unless  they 
obeyed  his  orders,  he  would  arrest  them),  and  thereupon  he  did  arrest  them, 
and  sent  them  off,  under  guard,  to  Gen.  Schenck's  Head-Quarters,  and  the  elec- 
tion was  broken  up.  The  judges  were  on  the  bench  just  12  minutes,  and  had 
taken  but  one  vote.  They  proceeded  to  Salisbury,  under  guard,  to  take  the  train 
for  Baltimore,  and  while  waiting  for  that  purpose,  were  put  into  the  Guard 
House.  After  remaining  there  awhile,  by  the  interference  of  Gen  Lorkwood, 
as  was  understood,  they  were  released  and  reached  home  at  one  o'clock,  on  the 
following  morning.  .  .  .  Capt.  Moore  said  he  had  orders  for  his  act  but  he  did 
not  exhibit  them,  as  far  as  I  know.  I  was  an  eye  witness  to  this  scene.  .  .  . 

"Proceedings  o£  the  same  general  nature,  occurred  in  ...  every  County. 
...  In  regard  to  this  county  authentic  statements,  verified  by  the  most  re- 
spectable witnesses,  have  been  prepared;  the  originals  of  which  have  been  sent 
to  the  Governor,  and  copies  will  be  published  in  the  County  paper,  a  copy  of 
which  will  be  sent  to  you. 

"It  is  not  for  me  to  suggest  what  can,  or  ought  to,  be  done,  but  .  .  .  public 
indignation  is  very  highly  aroused  and  will  not  be  appeased,  unless  the  pro- 
ceedings of  these  military  officers  be  disavowed  and  rebuked,  and  some  assur- 
ance be  given,  that  the  outrage  is  not  to  be  repeated.  .  .  ."  (DLC-IVTL). 

See  Lincoln  to  Schenck,  November  20,  infra. 

2  The  initial  "S"  may  be  in  error.  Crisfleld  would  be  the  person  meant,  and 
he  did  in  fact  procure  affidavits. 

To  John  Milderborger1 

John  Milderborger  Executive  Mansion 

Peru,  Indiana.  Washington  B.C.  Nov.  1  1.  1863 

I  can-not  comprehend  the  object  of  your  despatch.  I  do  not  often 
decline  seeing  people  who  call  upon  me;  and  probably  will  sop  you 
if  you  call.  A!  LTNCOI.TST. 


^ALS,  KPB.  John  Milderborger  telegraphed  on  November  11,  "Can  I  speak 
with  you  if  I  come.  Answer  quick."  (DLC-RTL).  No  further  reference  has  been 


found. 


To  John  M.  Schofield1 

Gen.  Schofield  Washington,  D.C  , 

St.  Louis,  Mo  Nov    14  l863 

I  beHeve  the  Secretary  of  War  has  telegraphed  you  about  mem- 
bers of  the  Legislature.  At  all  events,  allow  those  in  the  service  to 
attend  the  session;  and  we  can  afterwards  decide,  whether  they 
can  stay  through  the  entire  session.  A.  LINCOLN  ' 

1ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Schofield,  November  10,  supra.  No  teWrum 
from  Stanton  to  Schofield  about  members  of  the  legislature  has  been  located 

[10] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Nov.  11,  1863. 

What  is  there  about  Major,  or  Capt.  Beckwith?  Signs  appear  that 
an  unusual  commotion  is  to  occur  somehow  in  this  connection. 
Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALsS,  NHi;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  An  undated  note  from  First  Assistant  Post- 
master Gonoral  Alexander  W.  Randall  to  Montgomery  Blair  is  as  follows: 
"Col.  Beckwith  of  the  Commissary  Bureau  here  has  been  ordered  by  the  Secy. 
of  War,  to  the  West.  No  cause  of  complaint  against  him.  I  am  intimately  ac- 
quainted with  him  and  he  is  of  service  to  the  President's  friends  here  .  .  .  Can 
you  not  speak  to  the  President,  on  the  subject.  He  has  means  of  getting  hold  of 
a  good  deal  of  information  that  our  friends  will  need."  (DLC-RTL). 

Blair  endorsed  Randall's  note,  "The  within  is  from  Govr.  Randall  &  explains 
itself.  ...  I  believe  that  it  is  intended  to  get  some  one  here  in  other  interests. 
I  know  Beckwith  well  &  I  suspect  others  will  agree  with  me  that  he  is  a  good 
officer.  Burn  this," 

No  reply  from  Stanton  or  further  reference  has  been  located.  Colonel  (not 
Major}  An  IDS  Beckwith  was  certainly  the  officer  referred  to.  He  was  transferred 
to  St.  Louis,  Missouri  (New  York  Tribune,  November  12,  1863),  and  later  or- 
dered to  Nashville,  Tennessee,  becoming  after  March,  1864,  chief  commissary 
of  subsistence  for  the  Military  Division  of  the  Mississippi. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Nov.  11,  1863. 

I  personally  wish  Jacob  R.  Freese,  of  New- Jersey  to  be  appointed 
a  Colonel  for  a  colored  regiment — and  this  regardless  of  whether 
he  can  tell  the  exact  shade  of  Julius  Caesar's  hair.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  Jacob  R.  Frecse,  formerly  a  doctor  of  medicine  in  Bloomington, 
Illinois,  was  appointed  captain  and  assistant  adjutant  general  of  Volunteers  on 
August  24,  i8fiii.  Ho  resigned  on  December  31,  1863,  and  there  is  no  record  of 
his  further  appointment,  but  see  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  February  24,  1864,  and  to 
Ten  Eyck,  September  19,  1864,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Please  let  Gen.  Harrow  withdraw  his  resignation,  &  return  to  the 
service.  A.  LINCOLN 

Nov.  11.  1863. 

1  AES-P,  ISI^A.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  from  James  Hughes, 
November  5,  1863,  asking  that  the  resignation  of  Brigadier  General  William 
Harrow  of  Indiana,  late  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  be  revoked:  "Gen.  Harrow 
was  compelled  to  resign  by  domestic  affairs  which  required  his  presence  in  In- 
diana, but  which  will  now  permit  him  to  return  to  the  public  service.  He  left  the 

[ii] 


NOVEMBER      12,      1863 

army  with  regret,  and  is,  I  believe  a  valuable  and  efficient  officer."  Succeeding  en- 
dorsements indicate  that  Harrow's  resignation  was  cancelled.  Sec  Lincoln  to 
Stanton,  January  7,  1864,  infra. 

To  John  D.  Defrees1 

Mr.  Defrees — Please  see  this  girl  who  works  in  your  office,  and 
find  out  about  her  brother,  and  come  and  tell  me. 

November  12,  1863.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  Charles  B.  Boynton,  History  of  the  Great  Western  Sanitary  Fair  (1864), 
p.  183.  The  source  also  prints  a  letter  from  Defrees,  December  15,  transmitting 
Lincoln's  note  as  an  autograph  to  be  sold  at  the  Fair,  which  roads  in  part  as 
follows:  "A  poor  girl  in  the  employment  of  the  Government  printing-office  had 
a  brother  impressed  into  the  rebel  service,  and  was  taken  prisoner  by  our 
forces.  He  desired  to  take  the  oath  of  allegiance,  and  to  be  liberated.  She  sought 
an  interview  with  the  President,  who  wrote  the  note,  asking  me  to  inquire  into 
the  facts,  which  I  did,  and  the  young  man  was  liberated  on  the  President's 
order."  The  girl  has  not  been  identified. 

To  Richard  C.  Vaughan  or  Officer  in  Command 
at  Lexington,  Missouri1 

Gen.  Vaughan,  or  Executive  Mansion, 

Officer  in  Command  Washington, 

Lexington,  Mo.  Nov.  12.  1863. 

Let  execution  of  William  H.  Ogden  be  suspended  imtil  further 
order  from  me.  A.  LIINTCOI.X 

1  ALS,  KPB.  No  reply  has  been  found,  and  William  H.  Ogrlen  has  not  bc«*n 
identified.  Colonel  James  McFerran  was  in  command  of   tho   Dopnrtnmnt    of 
the  Missouri  with  headquarters  at  Warrensburg.   Presumably  Captain   Horace 
B.  Johnson  of  Company  L,  First  Missouri  State  Militia  Cavalry  was  in   mm 
mand  at  Lexington. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Edward  Bates  Executive  Mansion. 

My  dear  Sir.  Washington,  Nov.  1 3.  1 8f>  $. 

Herewith  I  return  the  papers  of  the  Western  Sanitary  Commis- 
sion. You  see  an  indorsement  thereon,  made  by  the  Secretary  of 
War,  which  expresses  his  view.  While  I  approve  heartily  tho  ob- 
ject of  the  commission,  I  wish  to  do  nothing  unsatisfactory  to  tho 
War  Department,  in  a  matter  pertaining  to  it's  business.  Yours 
"  A.  LTTSTCOI/IV 

8;*' £SLA*  Jhe  Papers  referred  to  in  this  letter  have  not  been  located, 
no  further  reference  has  been  found. 

[12] 


To  E.  H.  E.  Jameson1 

E.  H.  &  E.  Jameson  Washington,  D.C., 

Jefferson  City,  My  [>zc]  Nov.  13.  1863 

Yours  saying  Brown  and  Henderson  are  elected  Senators,  is  re- 
ceived. I  understand,  this  is  one  and  one.  If  so,  it  is  knocking  heads 
together  to  some  purpose.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Lincoln's  telegram  is  addressed  to  "E.  H.  &  E.  Jameson,"  be- 
cause the  following  telegram  received  from  Jameson  on  November  13  was  in- 
correctly transmitted:  "The  radicals  of  Missouri  have  elected  B.  Gratz  Brown 
&  John  B.  Henderson  U.S.  Senators."  (DLC-RTL).  E.  H.  E.  Jameson  was  a 
member  of  the  state  legislature  from  St.  Louis. 


Reply  to  John  Conness 
upon  Presentation  of  a  Cane1 

November  13,  1863 

The  President  then  accepted  the  cane,  and,  with  much  emotion, 
replied  that  he  never  personally  knew  the  Senator's  friend,  Mr. 
Broderick,  but  he  had  always  heard  him  spoken  of  as  one  sincerely 
devoted  to  the  cause  of  human  rights.  Testimony  to  this  point  of 
his  character  had  been  borne  by  those  whom  he  had  not  intimately 
known,  as  also  by  those  with  whom  he  was  personally  and  inti- 
mately acquainted,  and,  with  all  of  them,  the  testimony  had  been 
uniform.  The  memento  which  was  presented  him  by  Senator  Con- 
ness  was  of  that  class  of  things,  the  highest  honor  that  could  be 
conferred  upon  him.  If,  in  the  position  he  had  been  placed,  he  had 
done  anything  that  entitled  him  to  the  honor  the  Senator  had  as- 
signed him,  it  was  a  proud  reflection  that  his  acts  were  of  such  a 
character  as  to  merit  the  affiliation  of  the  friends  of  a  man  like 
David  C.  Broderick.  Whether  remaining  in  this  world  or  looking 
down  upon  the  earth  from  the  spirit  land,  to  be  remembered  by 
such  a  man  as  David  C.  Broderick  was  a  fact  he  would  remember 
through  all  the  years  of  his  life.  The  proudest  ambition  he  could 
desire  was  to  do  something  for  the  elevation  of  the  condition  of  his 
fellow-man.  In  conclusion,  he  returned  his  sincere  thanks  for  the 
part  the  Senator  bore  in  this  presentation,  and  to  the  memory  of 
his  great  friend. 

1  Cincinnati  Gazette,  November  17,  1863.  Senator  John  Conness  of  California, 
"accompanied  by  a  number  of  gentlemen,  most  of  them  citizens  of  Pennsyl- 
vania, called  upon  the  President  of  the  United  States  for  the  purpose  of  asking 
his  acceptance  of  a  cane  which  was  the  gift  to  him  of  his  great  predecessor  and 
exemplar,  David  Colbert  Broderick." 

[13] 


To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Major  General  Rosecrans  Washington,  B.C., 

Cincinnati,  O.  Nov.  14  1863  [12:15  P.M.] 

I  have  received  and  considered  your  despatch  of  yesterday.  Of 
the  Reports  you  mention  I  have  not  the  means  of  seeing  any  except 
your  own.  Besides  this  the  publication  might  be  improper  in  view 
of  the  Court  of  Inquiry  which  has  been  ordered.  With  every  dispo- 
sition, not  merely  to  do  justice,  but  to  oblige  you,  I  feel  constrained 
to  say  I  think  the  publication  better  not  be  made  now. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  RPB.  The  time  of  this  telegram  is  not  on  the  manuscript,  but  is  taken 
from  the  Official  Records,  I,  XXXI,  III,  144-  AGO,  General  Orders  No.  337, 
October  16,  1863,  created  the  Military  Division  of  the  Mississippi,  incorporating 
the  Departments  of  the  Ohio,  Cumberland,  and  Tennessee,  under  General  Grant, 
and  replaced  Rosecrans  with  General  George  H.  Thomas.  Rosecrans  telegraphed 
from  Cincinnati  on  November  13,  "Will  you  permit  me  to  publish  a  certified 
copy  of  my  official  report  of  the  Battle  of  Chicamauga  also  those  of  Generals 
Thomas,  McCook,  Crittenden  &  Granger.  It  is  an  act  of  justice  I  solicit  from 
one  in  whose  justice  I  confide."  (DLC-RTL).  Courts  of  inquiry  referred  to 
were  those  ordered  to  meet  January  29,  1864,  on  conduct  of  James  S.  Negley, 
Thomas  L.  Crittenden,  and  Alexander  M.  McCook  at  Chickamauga. 


To  Ambrose  E.  Burnside1 

Major  General  Burnside  Washington  City, 

Knoxville,  Tenn.  Nov.  16.  1863 

What  is  the  news?  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  On  November  17  Burnside  replied  to  Lincoln's  telegram: 

"Longstreet  crossed  the  Tennessee  River  on  Saturday  at  Huff's  Ferry  six 
miles  below  Loudon  with  about  15,000  men.  We  have  resisted  the  advance 
steadily  repulsing  every  attack,  holding  on,  till  our  position  was  turned  by  su- 
perior numbers,  and  then  retiring  in  good  order. 

"He  attacked  us  yesterday  about  eleven  o'clock  at  Campbell's  Station  and 
heavy  fighting  has  been  going  on  all  day.  in  which  we  have  held  our  own  and 
inflicted  serious  loss  on  the  enemy. 

"No  fighting  since  dark.  We  commenced  retiring,  and  the  most  of  the  com- 
mand is  now  within  the  lines  of  Knoxville.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

Memorandum  Concerning  Edward  L.  Hale1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
November  16,  1863. 
On  condition  that  Edward  L.  Hale,  named  within,  faithfully  serves 
in  his  present  position,  until  honorably  discharged,  he  is  fully  par- 
doned for  the  desertion  mentioned.  A  LINCOLN 
Nov.  16.  1863 
1  Copy,  DLC-RTL.  Edward  L.  Hale  has  not  been  identified. 

[14] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Nov.  17,  1863. 

Please  send  me  an  appointment  for  Richard  Busteed  of  N.  Y.  to 

be  Judge  in  Northern  Alabama,  in  place  of Lane  deceased. 

Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

!ALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  George  W.  Lane  of  Huntsville,  Alabama,  had  been  appointed  in  1861, 
but  being  a  strong  Unionist  he  had  been  forced  to  leave  the  state  and  never 
held  court.  Busteed's  appointment  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  January 
20,  1864. 


To  Salmon  R  Chase1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Nov.  17.  1863. 

I  expected  to  see  you  here  at  Cabinet  meeting,  and  to  say  some- 
thing about  going  to  Gettysburg.  There  will  be  a  train  to  take  and 
return  us.  The  time  for  starting  is  not  yet  fixed;  but  when  it  shall 
be,  I  will  notify  you.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  NBuG.  Chase  did  not  go  to  Gettysburg. 


To  Salmon  R  Chase1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Treasury  please  see  and  hear  Mr.  M.  V.  Hall  one  of 
the  best  men  in  northern  Illinois.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Nov.  17.  1863. 

1  Copy,   IHi-Nicolay  and  Hay   Papers.   Myron   V.   Hall  was   editor  of  the 
Aurora,  Illinois,  Beacon. 


Memorandum:  Appointment  of  Philo  R  Judson1 

Good    recommendations    for    a    Quarter-Master,    or    Commissary 
Nov.  17.  1863.  A.  LLNCOLN 

1 AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  recommendation  of 
Commissary  Sergeant  Philo  P.  Judson  signed  by  officers  of  the  Eighth  Illinois 
Cavalry,  November  13,  1863.  Judson  was  appointed  first  lieutenant  and  quar- 
termaster of  the  Seventeenth  Illinois  Cavalry  on  December  2,  1863.  He  was 
confirmed  as  commissary  of  subsistence  of  the  Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry  with  rank 
of  captain  on  April  20,  1864. 

[15] 


Order  Concerning  Union  Pacific  Railroad1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  November  17.  1863. 
In  pursuance  of  the  fourteenth  Section  of  the  act  of  congress,  en- 
titled "An  act  to  aid  in  the  construction  of  a  Railroad  and  Tele- 
graph Line  from  the  Missouri  river  to  the  Pacific  ocean,  and  to 
secure  to  the  Government  the  use  of  the  same  for  postal,  military, 
and  other  purposes"  Approved  July  i,  1862,  I,  Abraham  Lincoln, 
President  of  the  United  States,  do  hereby  fix  so  much  of  the  West- 
ern boundary  of  the  State  of  Iowa  as  lies  between  the  North  and 
South  boundaries  of  the  United  States  Township,  within  which  the 
City  of  Omaha  is  situated,  as  the  point  from  which  the  line  of  rail- 
road and  telegraph  in  that  section  mentioned,  shall  be  constructed. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

1  ADS,  IHi.  See  Lincoln's  order  of  March  7,  and  communication  to  the  Son- 
ate  of  March  9,  1864,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

[November  17,  1863] 

I  do  not  lite  this  arrangement.  I  do  not  wish  to  so  go  that  by  the 
slightest  accident  we  fail  entirely,  and,  at  the  best,  the  whole  to  be 
a  mere  breathless  running  of  the  gauntlet.  But,  any  way. 

A. 


1  NH,  IX,  208.  Nicolay  and  Hay  give  this  as  an  endorsement  on  the  follow- 
ing letter  from  Stanton  dated  November  17: 

"Mr.  President:  It  is  proposed  by  the  Baltimore  and  Ohio  road  — 

First,  to  leave  Washington  Thursday  morning  at  6  A.M.;  and 

Second,  To  leave  Baltimore  at  8  A.M.,  arriving  at  Gettysburg  at  13  noon,  thus 
giving  two  hours  to  view  the  ground  before  the  dedication  ceremonies  com- 
mence. 

Third,  To  leave  Gettysburg  at  6  P.M.,  and  arrive  hi  Washington,  midnight; 
thus  doing  all  in  one  day. 

Mr.  Smith  says  the  Northern  Central  road  agrees  to  this  arrangement. 

Please  consider  it,  and  if  any  change  is  desired,  let  me  know,  so  that  it  can 
be  made." 

Stanton  replied  later  in  the  day:  "The  arrangement  I  proposed  has  boon 
made  The  train  will  leave  the  Depot  at  12  oclock.  I  will  assign  the  Adjutant 
General  or  Col.  Fry  to  accompany  you  as  personal  escort  and  to  control  the 
train.  A  carriage  will  call  for  you  at  12.  Please  furnish  me  the  names  of  those 
whom  you  may  invite  that  they  may  be  furnished  with  tickets  and  unauthor- 
ized intrusion  prevented."  (DLC-RTL). 

Remarks  to  Citizens  of  Gettysburg,  Pennsylvania1 

November  18,  1863 

I  appear  before  you,  fellow-citizens,  merely  to  thank  you  for 
this  compliment.  The  inference  is  a  very  fair  one  that  you  would 

[16] 


NOVEMBER      19,       1863 

hear  me  for  a  little  while  at  least,  were  I  to  commence  to  make  a 
speech.  I  do  not  appear  before  you  for  the  purpose  of  doing  so,  and 
for  several  substantial  reasons.  The  most  substantial  of  these  is 
that  I  have  no  speech  to  make.  [Laughter.]  In  my  position  it  is 
somewhat  important  that  I  should  not  say  any  foolish  things. 

A  VOICE — If  you  can  help  it. 

Mr.  LINCOLN — It  very  often  happens  that  the  only  way  to  help  it 
is  to  say  nothing  at  all.  [Laughter.]  Believing  that  is  my  present 
condition  this  evening,  I  must  beg  of  you  to  excuse  me  from  ad- 
dressing you  further. 

1  New  York  Tribune,  November  20,  1863.  "After  supper  the  President  was 
serenaded  by  the  excellent  band  of  the  5th  New- York  Artillery.  After  repeated 
calls,  Mr.  Lincoln  at  length  presented  himself,  when  he  was  loudly  cheered." 
(Ibid.). 

Address  Delivered  at  the  Dedication  of 
the  Cemetery  at  Gettysburg1 

November  19,  1863 

FIRST      DRAFT2 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  ,186 

Four  score  and  seven  years  ago  our  fathers  brought  forth,  upon 
this  continent,  a  new  nation,  conceived  in  liberty,  and  dedicated  to 
the  proposition  that  "all  men  are  created  equal" 

Now  we  are  engaged  in  a  great  civil  war,  testing  whether  that 
nation,  or  any  nation  so  conceived,  and  so  dedicated,  can  long  en- 
dure. We  are  met  on  a  great  battle  field  of  that  war.  We  have  come 
to  dedicate  a  portion  of  it,  as  a  final  resting  place  for  those  who 
died  here,  that  the  nation  might  live.  This  we  may,  in  all  propriety 

1  Sources  of  the  various  drafts  and  reports  of  this  speech  are  given  in  the 
succeeding  footnotes. 

2  The  fact  that  the  first  page  of  this  draft  was  written  in  ink  on  Executive 
Mansion  stationery  indicates  that  this  page  was  written  at  Washington  before 
Lincoln  went  to  Gettysburg.  Since  the  page  ends  in  an  incomplete  sentence,  it 
may  be  inferred  that  there  was  also  a  second  page  written  in  Washington.  The 
only  extant  second  page,  however,  written  in  pencil  on  lined  paper,  shows  in- 
dications of  being  a  copy,  presumably  of  an  original  page  so  completely  revised 
and  overwritten  that  Lincoln  threw  it  away.  It  is  also  possible,  however,  that 
this  copy  was  made  from  the  second  draft  (see  note  3),  or  possibly  from  a  still 
different  draft  of  which  we  have  no  knowledge. 

When  he  made  the  copy  is  another  matter  of  uncertainty.  According  to  John 
G.  Nicolay,  he  wrote  it  at  Gettysburg  on  the  morning  of  November  19  (for 
Nicolay's  complete  account,  see  Century  Magazine,  new  series,  XXV,  596-608); 
but  it  is  also  possible  that  he  wrote  this  page  on  the  night  of  November  18  and 
the  second  draft  on  the  igth  (see  William  E.  Barton,  Lincoln  at  Gettysburg, 
pp.  68  ff.). 

[17] 


ISTOVKMBER      19,       1863 

do.  But,  in  a  larger  sense,  we  can  not  dedicate — we  can  not  con- 
secrate— we  can  not  hallow,  this  ground.  The  brave  men,  living 
and  dead,  who  struggled  here,  have  hallowed  it,  far  above  our  poor 
power  to  add  or  detract.  The  world  will  little  note,  nor  long  re- 
member what  we  say  here;  while  it  can  never  forget  what  they 
did  here. 

It  is  rather  for  us,  the  living,  to  stand  here,  we  here  be  dedicci-;i 

{Second  Page"} 

ted  to  the  great  task  remaining  before  us — that,  from  these  hon- 
ored dead  we  take  increased  devotion  to  that  cause  for  which  they 
here,  gave  the  last  full  measure  of  devotion — that  we  here  highly 
resolve  these  dead  shall  not  have  died  in  vain;  that  the  nation,  shall 
have  a  new  birth  of  freedom,  and  that  government  of  the  people; 
by  the  people  for  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the  earth. 

SECOND      DRAFT4 

Four  score  and  seven  years  ago  our  fathers  brought  forth,  upon 
this  continent,  a  new  nation,  conceived  in  Liberty,  and  dedicated 
to  the  proposition  that  all  men  are  created  equal. 

Now  we  are  engaged  in  a  great  civil  war,  testing  whether  thai 
nation,  or  any  nation,  so  conceived,  and  so  dedicated,  can  long  en  - 

8  The  last  three  words  written  in  ink  on  the  first  page,  "to  stand  hen*,'*  were 
deleted  by  Lincoln  and  "we  here  be  dedica-"  inserted  in  pencil.  If  tin*  extant 
second  page  of  the  first  draft  is  a  copy,  in  making  the  copy  Lincoln  presumably 
erred  in  beginning  the  revision  at  the  end  of  page  one  with  the  word  ^dedi- 
cated" which  appears  in  line  17  of  the  second  draft,  instead  of  beginning  with 
the  word  "dedicated"  in  line  15. 

4ADf,  DLC.  This  draft  is  written  on  lined  paper  similar  to  the  extant  sec 
ond  page  of  the  first  draft.  The  emendations  which  appear  in  this  draft  and  the 
important  revisions  from  the  first  draft  are  indicated  in  succeeding  notes. 

The  exact  relationship  between  the  first  and  second  drafts  cannot  now  be 
established  beyond  question,  for  certain  emendations  in  the  second  draft  restmv 
the  reading  of  the  first  draft.  Some  of  these  emendations,  however,  must  hav<* 
been  made  after  Lincoln  delivered  the  speech,  for  the  newspaper  versions  follow 
in  some  instances  the  original  wording  of  this  draft  rather  than  the  emenda- 
tions (notes  6,  7,  8,  12).  Thus  it  would  seem  that  although  Lincoln  spoke  from 
the  second  draft  as  first  written,  and  perhaps  partially  revised,  he  did  not  read 
it  verbatim.  He  probably  made  further  changes  in  this  draft  after  the  address 
to  make  it  conform  to  what  he  said. 

Nicolay  states  that  Lincoln  prepared  "a  new  autograph  copy"  after  he  con 
suited  newspaper  reports  of  the  address.  Possibly  Nicolay  referred  to  the  Kverett. 
copy  (infra),  which  we  do  not  know  to  have  been  prepared  after  rather  than 
before  receipt  of  Everett's  letter  of  January  30,  1864.  It  has  also  been  supposed 
that  there  was  once  an  autograph  copy  prepared  for  Judge  David  Wills,  at 
whose  home  Lincoln  stayed  on  the  night  before  the  dedication  ceremony,  'but 
this  supposed  copy  has  never  been  located.  In  any  event  Nicolay's  acro'unt  is 
incomplete  and  vague,  and  shows  no  acquaintance  with  the  second  draft. 

[18] 


NOVEMBER      19,      1863 

dure.  We  are  met  here5  on  a  great  battle-field  of  that  war.  We 
have  come6  to  dedicate  a  portion  of  it  as  a7  final  resting  place  for8 
those  who9  here  gave  their  lives  that  that  nation  might  live.  It10 
is  altogether  fitting  and  proper  that  we  should  do  this. 

But  in  a  larger  sense  we  can  not  dedicate — we  can  not  conse- 
crate— we  can  not  hallow  this  ground.  The  brave  men,  living  and 
dead,  who  struggled  here,  have  consecrated11  it  far  above  our 
poor12  power  to  add  or  detract.  The  world  will  little  note,  nor  long 
remember,  what  we  say  here,  but13  can  never  forget  what  they 
did  here.  It  is14  for  us,  the  living,  rather  to  be  dedicated  here  to 
the  unfinished  work  which  they  have,  thus  far,  so  nobly  carried 
on.  It  is  rather  for  us  to  be  here  dedicated  to  the  great  task  remain- 
ing before  us — that  from  these  honored  dead  we  take  increased 
devotion  to  that15  cause  for  which  they  here  gave  the  last  full 
measure  of  devotion — that  we  here  highly  resolve  that16  these  dead 
shall  not  have  died  in  vain;  that  this17  nation  shall  have  a  new 
birth  of  freedom;  and  that  this18  government  of  the  people,  by  the 
people,  for  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the  earth. 


NEWSPAPER     VERSIO  N19 

Four  score  and  seven  years  ago  our  fathers  brought  forth  upon 
this  continent  a  new  Nation,  conceived  in  Liberty,  and  dedicated 
to  the  proposition  that  all  men  are  created  equal.  [Applause.]  Now 

6  "Here"  does  not  appear  in  the  first  draft, 

6  Lincoln  wrote  "are  met,"  deleted  the  words,  and  inserted  "have  come,"  as 
in  the  first  draft. 

7  Lincoln  wrote  "the,"  deleted  the  word,  and  substituted  "a,"  as  in  the  first 
draft. 

8  Lincoln  wrote  "of,"  deleted  the  word,  and  substituted  "for"  as  in  the  first 
draft.  °  First  draft  reads  "who  died  here,  that  the  nation  might  live." 

1°  See  first  draft  for  first  version  of  this  sentence. 

11  First  draft  reads  "hallowed." 

12  "Poor,"  as  in  the  first  draft,   purposely   or  inadvertently   omitted,   is  in- 
serted above  the  line.  i8  First  draft  reads  "while  it  can  never." 

14  See  note  3. 

15  Lincoln  wrote  "the,"  deleted  the  word,  and  substituted  "that,"  as  in  first 
draft.  1°  "That"  does  not  appear  in  the  first  draft. 

17  "The  nation,"  in  first  draft. 

is  "This"  does  not  appear  in  the  first  draft. 

1°  New  York  Tribune,  Times,  and  Herald,  November  20,  1863.  Except  for 
minor  differences  in  punctuation  and  capitalization,  the  text  is  the  same  in  all 
three  papers  and  is  the  Associated  Press  version  prepared  by  Joseph  L.  Gilbert. 
According  to  Gilbert's  later  account,  his  text  was  prepared  partly  from  his 
shorthand  notes  and  partly  from  Lincoln's  manuscript  (see  Barton,  op.  cit.9  pp. 
189-92).  Since  this  version  follows  closely  the  second  draft  prior  to  its  having 
been  emended,  down  to  the  final  sentence,  we  have  to  account  chiefly  for  the 
variants  between  the  newspaper  text  and  the  second  draft  in  this  final  sentence. 
All  of  these  variants  may  be  explained  by  the  hypothesis  that  "Lin coin  did  not 

[19] 


NOVEMBER      1Q9      1863 

we  are  engaged  in  a  great  civil  war,  testing  whether  that  Nation 
or  any  Nation  so  conceived  and  so  dedicated  can  long  endure.  We 
are  met  on  a  great  battle-field  of  that  war.  We  are  met  to  dedicate 
a  portion  of  it  as  the  final  resting-place  of  those  who  here  gave20 
their  lives  that  that  nation  might  live.  It  is  altogether  fitting  and 
proper  that  we  should  do  this.  But  in  a  larger  sense  we  cannot 
dedicate,  we  cannot  consecrate,  we  cannot  hallow  this  ground.  The 
brave  men  living  and  dead  who  struggled  here  have  consecrated 
it  far  above  our  power21  to  add  or  detract.  [Applause.]  The  world 
will  little  note  nor  long  remember  what  we  say  here,  but  it  can 
never  forget  what  they  did  here.  [Applause.]  It  is  for  us,  the  liv- 
ing, rather  to  be  dedicated  here  to  the  refinished22  work  that  they 
have  thus  far  so  nobly  carried  on.  [Applause.]  It  is  rather  for  us  to 
be  here  dedicated  to  the  great  task  remaining  before  us,  that  from 
these  honored  dead  we  take  increased  devotion  to  that  cause  for 
which  they  here  gave  the  last  full  measure  of  devotion;  that  we 
here  highly  resolve  that  the23  dead  shall  not  have  died  in  vain 
[applause] ;  that  the  nation  shall,  under  God,  have  a  new  birth  of 

read  his  manuscript  verbatim,  and  hence  Gilbert's  shorthand  followed  the 
spoken  word.  Some  of  them  may  be  accounted  for  as  errors,  which  in  spite  of 
having  access  to  the  manuscript  Gilbert  did  not  correct,  or  which  occur  rod  in 
transcription.  In  any  event  Gilbert  seems  not  to  have  relied  on  the  manuscript 
for  Lincoln's  last  sentence. 

Aside  from  Gilbert's  text  there  are  several  independent  newspaper  texts,  of 
varying  degrees  of  reliability,  such  as  those  in  the  Chicago  Tribune  and  Phila- 
delphia Inquirer.  Inferior  in  general,  they  are  important  chiefly  in  establishing; 
one  word,  "poor,"  omitted  by  Gilbert,  which  Lincoln  assuredly  must  have 
spoken  and  which  appears  in  both  first  and  second  drafts.  "Our  poor  power," 
rather  than  Gilbert's  "our  power,"  appears  in  the  Chicago  Tribune  and  the 
Philadelphia  Inquirer  has  "our  poor  attempts,"  in  texts  prepared  independently 
of  each  other,  and  also  independently  of  the  Associated  Press  text.  These  papers 
corroborate  Gilbert's  version,  however,  in  having  the  phrase  "under  God/'  which 
Lincoln  must  have  used  for  the  first  time  as  he  spoke. 

Barton  (op.  cit.9  pp.  80-83)  credits  the  text  taken  down  in  shorthand  by 
Charles  Hale  of  the  Boston  Advertiser  as  being  "what  Lincoln  actually  said/' 
and  gives  it  preference  over  Gilbert's  text  chiefly  on  the  ground  that  Gilbert 
consulted  Lincoln's  manuscript,  whereas  Hale  relied  solely  on  his  shorthand 
notes.  The  few  particulars  in  which  Hale's  version  differs  from  Gilbert's  have 
been  indicated  in  footnotes.  In  one  particular,  however,  it  may  be  questioned 
whether  Hale  was  accurate — along  with  Gilbert  he  omits  "poor"  from  "our 
poor  power."  It  is  difficult  to  comprehend  how  "poor"  found  its  way  into  other 
newspaper  reports  unless  Lincoln  spoke  the  word,  and  yet  both  Gilbert  and  Hale 
omitted  it. 

20  Hale's  text  and  that  of  the  Chicago  Tribune  are  "have  given." 

21  Philadelphia  Inquirer  has  "our  poor  attempts"  and  Chicago   Tribune  has 
"our  poor  power." 

22  A  obvious  error  in  Gilbert's  text  in  all  three  New  York  papers.  Hale's  ver- 
sion and  the  Chicago  Tribune  have  "unfinished." 

28  Hale's  version  has  "these"  as  in  the  drafts. 

[20] 


NOVEMBER      1Q5      1863 

freedom;  and  that  Governments24  of  the  people,  by  the  people, 
and25  for  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the  earth.  [Long-con- 
tinued applause.] 

EDWARD     EVERETT      COP  Y26 

Four  score  and  seven  years  ago  our  fathers  brought  forth  upon 
this  continent,  a  new  nation,  conceived  in  Liberty,  and  dedicated 
to  the  proposition  that  all  men  are  created  equal. 

Now  we  are  engaged  in  a  great  civil  war,  testing  whether  that 
nation,  or  any  nation  so  conceived,  and  so  dedicated,  can  long  en- 
dure. We  are  met  on  a  great  battle-field  of  that  war.  We  have  come 
to  dedicate  a  portion  of  that  field,27  as  a  final  resting  place  for  those 
who  here  gave  their  lives,  that  that  nation  might  live.  It  is  alto- 
gether fitting  and  proper  that  we  should  do  this. 

But,  in  a  larger  sense,  we  can  not  dedicate — we  can  not  conse- 
crate— we  can  not  hallow — this  ground.  The  brave  men,  living  and 
dead,  who  struggled  here,  have  consecrated  it,  far  above  our  poor 
power  to  add  or  detract.  The  world  will  little  note,  nor  long  re- 
member, what  we  say  here,  but  it28  can  never  forget  what  they 
did  here.  It  is  for  us,  the  living,  rather,  to  be  dedicated  here  to  the 
unfinished  work  which  they  who29  fought  here,  have,  thus  far,  so 
nobly  advanced.  It  is  rather  for  us  to  be  here  dedicated  to  the  great 
task  remaining  before  us — that  from  these  honored  dead  we  take 
increased  devotion  to  that  cause  for  which  they  here  gave  the  last 
full  measure  of  devotion — that  we  here  highly  resolve  that  these 
dead  shall  not  have  died  in  vain — that  this  nation,  under  God,30 
shall  have  a  new  birth  of  freedom — and  that,  government  of  the 
people,  by  the  people,  for  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the 
earth. 

24  The  plural  appears  only  in  Gilbert's  text,  so  far  as  is  known,  and  may  well 
be  an  error  of  transcription. 

25  Hale's  version  omits  "and"  as  in  the  drafts,  but  the  Inquirer  text  also  has 
"and." 

26  AD,  IHi.  This  manuscript  was  sent  to  Edward  Everett,  to  be  bound  in  a 
volume  with  the  manuscript  of  Everett's  address  and  sold  at  the  Sanitary  Fair 
in  New  York.  For  particulars  see  the  note  to  Lincoln's  letter  to  Everett,  Feb- 
ruary 4,  1864,  infra.  It  is  not  certain  that  this  copy  was  made  specifically  for 
this  purpose  after  receipt  of  Everett's  letter  of  January  30,  and  quite  probably 
it  may  have  been  made  earlier.  In  either  case,  comparison  of  the  Everett  copy 
with  the  first  and  second  drafts  and  with  the  newspaper  versions  shows  it  to 
nave  been  made  as  a  careful  revision,  incorporating  the  phrase  "under  God" 
md  other  minor  changes  from  the  newspapers,  and  making  additional  revisions 
is  indicated  in  the  succeeding  notes,  but  in  general  following  the  revised  second 
Iraft.  27  "That  field"  replaced  "it"  of  the  earlier  versions. 

28  "It"  was  adopted  from  the  newspaper  version. 

20  The  remainder  of  this  sentence  was  completely  revised  from  the  earlier 
rersions.  30  "Under  God"  was  incorporated  from  the  newspaper  versions. 

[21] 


NOVEMBER      2O,      1863 

Four  score  and  seven  years  ago  our  fathers  brought  forth  on 
this  continent,  a  new  nation,  conceived  in  Liberty,  and  dedicated 
to  the  proposition  that  all  men  are  created  equal. 

Now  we  are  engaged  in  a  great  civil  war,  testing  whether  that 
nation,  or  any  nation  so  conceived  and  so  dedicated,  can  long  en- 
dure. We  are  met  on  a  great  battle-field  of  that  war.  We  have  come 
to  dedicate  a  portion  of  that  field,  as  a  final  resting  place  for  those 
who  here  gave  their  lives  that  that  nation  might  live.  It  is  alto- 
gether fitting  and  proper  that  we  should  do  this. 

But,  in  a  larger  sense,  we  can  not  dedicate — we  can  not  conse- 
crate— we  can  not  hallow — this  ground.  The  brave  men,  living  and 
dead,  who  struggled  here,  have  consecrated  it,  far  above  our  poor 
power  to  add  or  detract.  The  world  will  little  note,  nor  long  re- 
member what  we  say  here,  but  it  can  never  forget  what  they  did 
here.  It  is  for  us  the  living,  rather,  to  be  dedicated  here  to  the 
xmfinished  work  which  they  who  fought  here  have  thus  far  so 
nobly  advanced.  It  is  rather  for  us  to  be  here  dedicated  to  the  great 
task  remaining  before  us — that  from  these  honored  dead  we  take 
increased  devotion  to  that  cause  for  which  they34  gave  the  last  full 
measure  of  devotion — that  we  here  highly  resolve  that  these  dead 
shall  not  have  died  in  vain — that  this  nation,  under  God,  shall  have 
a  new  birth  of  freedom — and  that  government  of  the  people,  by  the 
people,  for  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the  earth. 

November  19.  1863.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

34  "Here"  is  omitted  from  the  phrase  "they  here  gave,"  which  appears  in 
preceding  versions. 


To  Henry  B.  Blood1 

Capt.  Blood  furnish  one  Horse  for  bearer 
Nov.  19.  1863  A  LiisrcoLisr 

1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  Captain  Henry  B.  Blood  was  assistant  quartermaster  of  Volun- 
teers. The  bearer  has  not  boen  identified. 

To  Zachariah  Chandler1 


Men.  Z.  Chandler  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Nov.  20.  1863. 

Your  letter  of  the  i5th.  marked  "private"  was  received  to-day.  I 
lave  seen  Gov.  Morgan  and  Thurlow  Weed,  separately,  but  not 

[23] 


NOVEMBER      IQ,      1863 

GEORGE     BANCROFT      COP  Y81 

Four  score  and  seven  years  ago  our  fathers  brought  forth,  on82 
this  continent,  a  new  nation,  conceived  in  Liberty,  and  dedicated 
to  the  proposition  that  all  men  are  created  equal. 

Now  we  are  engaged  in  a  great  civil  war,  testing  whether  that 
nation,  or  any  nation  so  conceived,  and  so  dedicated,  can  long 
endure.  We  are  met  on  a  great  battle-field  of  that  war.  Wo  have 
come  to  dedicate  a  portion  of  that  field,  as  a  final  resting-place  for 
those  who  here  gave  their  lives,  that  that  nation  might  live.  It  is 
altogether  fitting  and  proper  that  we  should  do  this. 

But,  in  a  larger  sense,  we  can  not  dedicate — we  can  not  conse- 
crate— we  can  not  hallow — this  ground.  The  brave  men,  living  and 
dead,  who  struggled  here,  have  consecrated  it  far  above  our  poor 
power  to  add  or  detract.  The  world  will  little  note,  nor  long  re- 
member what  we  say  here,  but  it  can  never  forget  what:  they  did 
here.  It  is  for  us  the  living,  rather,  to  be  dedicated  here  to  the  un- 
finished -work  which  they  who  fought  here  have  thus  far  so  nobly 
advanced.  It  is  rather  for  us  to  be  here  dedicated  to  the  groat  task 
remaining  before  us — that  from  these  honored  dead  we  talco  in- 
creased devotion  to  that  cause  for  which  they  here  gave  the  last 
full  measure  of  devotion — that  we  here  highly  resolve  that  these 
dead  shall  not  have  died  in  vain — that  this  nation,  under  God,  shall 
have  a  new  birth  of  freedom — and  that  government;  of  the  people, 
by  the  people,  for  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the  earth. 

FI1STAL    TEX  T33 

Address  delivered  at  the  dedication  of  the  Cemetery  at  Gettys- 
burg. 

81  AD,  NIC.  This  copy  was  prepared  upon  request  of  George  Bancroft  for 
reproduction  in  facsimile  in  Autograph  Leaves  of  Our  Country's  Authors  ( i  8(5.-j.), 
a  volume  to  be  sold  by  the  Baltimore  Sanitary  Fair.  For  particulars  see  Lin 
coin's  letter  to  Bancroft,  February  29,  1864,  infra.  This  text  is  notable*  chiefly 
for  Lincoln's  change  of  "upon  this  continent"  to  "on  this  continent."  Written 
on  both  sides  of  a  single  sheet  of  paper,  the  manuscript  was  not  suitable  for 
reproduction,  and  hence  Lincoln  prepared  the  final  copy,  infra. 

32  "On"  replaced  "upon"  of  the  earlier  versions. 

ss  ADS,  owned  by  Oscar  Cintas,  Havana,  Cuba.  Generally  known  as  the  "Bliss 
Copy"  from  its  long  possession  by  the  family  of  Alexander  Bliss,  a  member  of 
the  committee  which  obtained  the  volume  of  original  autographs  to  provide 
facsimiles  for  Autograph  Leaves  of  Our  Country's  Authors,  this  was  Lincoln's 
final  text.  Only  one  change  in  wording,  as  noted,  was  made  in  this  copy  from 
the  Bancroft  copy.  The  exact  date  that  Lincoln  prepared  this  final  manuscript 
is  not  known,  but  was  sometime  later  than  March  4,  1864,  when  John 
P.  Kennedy  wrote  on  behalf  of  the  Baltimore  Sanitary  Fair  to  explain  that  the 
Bancroft  copy  would  not  do  because  it  could  not  be  fitted  to  the  pages  of  the 
proposed  volume. 

[22] 


NOVEMBER      2  O,      ±863 

together,  within  the  last  ten  days;  but  neither  of  them  mentioned 
the  forthcoming  message,  or  said  anything,  so  far  as  I  can  remem- 
ber, which  brought  the  thought  of  the  Message  to  my  mind. 

I  am  very  glad  the  elections  this  autumn  have  gone  favorably, 
and  that  I  have  not,  by  native  depravity,  or  under  evil  influences, 
done  anything  bad  enough  to  prevent  the  good  result. 

I  hope  to  "stand  firm"  enough  to  not  go  backward,  and  yet  not 
go  forward  fast  enough  to  wreck  the  country's  cause.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLIST 

1ALS,  DLC-Chandler  Papers.  On  November  15,  Senator  Chandler  wrote 
Lincoln  protesting  published  reports  that  "  'Thurlow  Weed  and  Gov  Morgan  & 
other  distinguished  Republicans  are  here  [Washington]  urging  the  President  to 
take  bold  conservative  ground  in  his  message.*  I  have  been  upon  the  stump  more 
than  two  months  this  fall  &  have  certainly  talked  to  more  than  200,000  people 
in  Illinois  Ohio  &  New  York  ...  &  have  yet  to  meet  the  first  Republican  or 
real  War  Democrat  who  stands  by  Thurlough  Weed  or  Mr  Blair.  All  denounce 
them.  ,  .  .  You  are  today  Master  of  the  situation  if  you  stand  firm.  The  people 
endorsed  you  gloriously  in  every  state  save  one  &  New  Jersey  could  have  been 
carried  by  a  bold  radical  campaign.  .  .  .  Conservatives  &  traitors  are  buried  to- 
gether, for  Gods  sake  dont  exhume  their  remains  in  Your  Message.  They  will 
smell  worse  than  Lazarus  did  after  he  had  been  buried  three  days  (Chandler 
to  Lincoln,  November  15,  1863,  ibid.). 


To  Edward  Everett1 

Hon.  Edward  Everett.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Nov.  20,  1863, 

Your  kind  note  of  to-day  is  received.  In  our  respective  parts  yes- 
terday, you  could  not  have  been  excused  to  make  a  short  address, 
nor  I  a  long  one.  I  am  pleased  to  know  that,  in  your  judgment,  the 
little  I  did  say  was  not  entirely  a  failure.  Of  course  I  knew  Mr. 
Everett  would  not  fail;  and  yet,  while  the  whole  discourse  was  emi- 
nently satisfactory,  and  will  be  of  great  value,  there  were  passages 
in  it  which  trancended  my  expectation.  The  point  made  against 
the  theory  of  the  general  government  being  only  an  agency,  whoso 
principals  are  the  States,  was  new  to  me,  and,  as  I  think,  is  one  of 
the  best  arguments  for  the  national  supremacy.  The  tribute  to  our 
noble  women  for  their  angel-ministering  to  the  suffering  soldiers, 
surpasses,  in  its  way,  as  do  the  subjects  of  it,  whatever  has  gone 
before. 

Our  sick  boy,  for  whom  you  kindly  inquire,  we  hope  is  past  the 
worst.  Your  Obt.  Servt.  A. 


1  ALS,  MHi.  On  November  20,  Edward  Everett  wrote  Lincoln- 
"Not  wishing  to  intrude  upon  your  privacy,  when  you  must  be  much  en- 
gaged, I  beg  leave,  in  this  way,  to  thank  you  very  sincerely  for  your  great 

[24] 


NOVEMBER      2  O,      ±863 

thoughtfulness  for  my  daughter's  accommodation  on  the  Platform  yesterday,  & 
much  kindness  otherwise  to  me  &  mine  at  Gettysburg. 

"Permit  me  also  to  express  my  great  admiration  of  the  thoughts  expressed 
by  you,  with  such  eloquent  simplicity  &  appropriateness,  at  the  consecration 
of  the  cemetery.  I  should  be  glad,  if  I  could  Hatter  myself  that  I  came  as  near 
to  the  central  idea  of  the  occasion,  in  two  hours,  as  you  did  in  two  minutes.  My 
son  who  parted  from  me  at  Baltimore  &  my  daughter,  concur  in  this  senti- 
ment. .  .  ." 

"I  hope  your  anxiety  for  your  child  was  relieved  on  your  arrival."  (DLC- 
RTL). 

"Tad"  Lincoln  had  been  sick  when  Lincoln  went  to  Gettysburg  on  November 
18,  and  Lincoln  was  ill  with  varioloid  for  several  days  following  his  return  to 
Washington. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  General  Meade  Executive  Mansion 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington  D.C.  Nov.  20.  1 863 

If  there  is  a  man  by  the  name  of  King  under  sentence  to  be  shot, 
please  suspend  execution  till  further  order,  and  send  record. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  THaroL,.  See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  infra. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  Gen.  Meade  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington,  Nov.  20,  1863. 

An  intelligent  woman  [in]  deep  distress,  called  this  morning, 
saying  her  husband,  a  Lieutenant  in  the  A.P.  was  to  be  shot  next 
Monday  for  desertion;  and  putting  a  letter  in  my  hand,  upon 
which  I  relied  for  particulars,  she  left  without  mentioning  a  name, 
or  other  particular  by  which  to  identify  the  case.  On  opening  the 
letter  I  found  it  equally  vague,  having  nothing  to  identify  by,  ex- 
cept her  own  signature,  which  seems  to  be  "Mrs.  Anna  S.  King"  I 
could  not  again  find  her.  If  you  have  a  case  which  you  shall  think 
is  probably  the  one  intended,  please  apply  my  despatch  of  this 
morning  to  it.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  No  reply  either  to  this  communication  or  the  telegram,  supra, 
has  been  found.  The  sentence  of  First  Lieutenant  Edward  King,  Company  H, 
Sixty-sixth  New  York  Infantry,  was  commuted  to  imprisonment  on  the  Dry 
Tortugas,  May  13,  1864.  Letters  from  Hay  and  Nicolay  to  Joseph  Holt,  Jan- 
uary 8,  1864,  and  May  13,  1864  (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General, 
MM  1182)  relate  how  Mrs.  King  was  swindled  by  "an  officer  who  gave  his 
name  as  Captain  Parker  Co.  M.  i2th  Pa  Cavalry,  who  promised  for  $300  to 
get  her  husband  pardoned — claimed  to  know  you,  &  got  all  the  money  the  poor 
creature  had." 

[25] 


Memorandum : 

Appointment  of  Richard  S.  Hayes1 

West-Point —  [November  20,  1863] 

Richard  Somers  Hayes — is  Grandson  of  Com.  Bainbridge,  and 
Grandnephew  of  Corns.  Barry  &  Somers.  His  mother,  now  a  widow, 
is  daughter  of  Com.  Bainbridge. 

1AE,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1861,  No.  886.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  on  an  envelope  with  recommendations  for  Richard  S.  Hayes, 
grandson  of  William  Bainbridge  and  grandnephew  of  John  Barry  and  Richard 
Somers.  No  record  of  Hayes'  appointment  has  been  found. 

To  Robert  C.  Schenck1 

Major  General  Schenck  Executive  Mansion, 

Baltimore,  Md.  Washington,  Nov.  20,  1863. 

It  is  my  wish  that  neither  Maynadier,  nor  Gordon,  be  executed 
without  my  further  order.  Please  act  upon  this. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  found.  Private  John  H.  Maynadier,  First 
Virginia  Cavalry,  CSA,  was  sentenced  to  be  shot  on  November  25  for  being  a 
spy.  William  F.  Gordon,  private  in  the  Thirty-third  Virginia  Cavalry  who  had 
been  commissioned  a  captain  to  raise  a  company  (never  regularly  commis- 
sioned) was  sentenced  for  recruiting  within  Union  lines. 

To  Robert  C.  Schenck1 

November  20,  1863 

Major  General  Schenck  will  put  on  trial  before  a  Military  com- 
mission, Capt.  Moore,  mentioned  within  for  having  transcended 
General  Order  No.  53,  in  arresting  the  Judges  of  election,  mid  for 
having  hindered  Arthur  Crisfield,  from  voting,  notwithstanding  his 
willingness  to  take  the  oath  in  said  order  prescribed.  Let  Hon.  John 
W.  Crisfield  be  notified  of  time  and  place,  and  witnesses  named  by 
him  as  well  as  by  Capt.  Moore,  be  examined.  Let  time  and  plnoo 
be  reasonably  convenient  to  witnesses,  and  full  record  kopt  &  pro- 
served.  A.  LINCOI-N 
Nov.  20.  1863. 

1 AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1277.  Sec  Lincoln 
to  Bradford,  November  2,  and  to  Blair,  November  11,  supra.  On  November  14, 
John  W.  Crisfield  wrote  Montgomery  Blair: 

"Yours  of  the  12th.  covering  the  President's  of  the  day  previous  just  at  hand 

"I  enclose  the  affidavit  of  W.  H.  Fisher,  the  only  judge  of  election  residing  in 
this  village,  and  immediately  accessible  to  me.  I  will  send  others  as  thcv  ran 
be  obtained. 

"The  judges  ...  live  remote  from  me.  ...  Why  will  not  the  affidavits  of 
other  credible  persons  do  as  well?  .... 

[26] 


NOVEMBER      21,      1863 

"I  -will  cause  copies  of  the  Presidents  letter  to  be  sent  to  each  county  in  my 
district,  and  direct  such  affidavits  as  may  be  procured  to  be  forwarded  ...  to 
you.  .  .  ." 

On  Crisfield's  letter  Lincoln  endorsed  "Affadavit  named  within,  sent  to  Gen. 
Schenck,  indorsed  as  follows:  [copy  of  same  endorsement  as  above  but  not  in 
Lincoln's  hand]"  (DLC-RTL). 

Concerning  Captain  Charles  C.  Moore,  Third  Maryland  Cavalry,  see  further 
Lincoln  to  Holt,  February  22,  1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Nov.  20,  1863. 

Please  see  and  hear  the  Attorney  General,  and  oblige  him  in 
what  he  will  ask  in  regard  to  a  niece  of  his  who  is  in  distress.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN 

*ALS,  owned  by  Wilson  F.  Harwood,  Washington,  D.C.  On  the  bottom  of  the 
letter  Stanton  endorsed  on  November  22,  "Approved.  Mrs  Flementine  Ball 
has  permission  to  return  to  her  home  with  her  family  necessaries."  An  accom- 
panying note  of  Gideon  Welles  to  Commodore  Andrew  A.  Harwood,  November 
21,  1863,  reads  as  follows:  "Comodore  Harwood  will  attend  to  the  request  of 
the  Attorney  General  Bates,  who  desires  that  his  niece  an  infirm  lady  may  be 
conveyed  to,  and  landed  at  Cone  River,  or  in  its  vicinity."  Other  letters  pre- 
served with  these  indicate  that  Mrs.  Flementine  Ball,  Bates'  niece,  was  suc- 
cessfully transported  to  Coan  River,  a  tributary  of  the  Potomac  in  Northumber- 
land County,  Virginia,  adjoining  Lancaster  County  where  she  lived. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

November  20,  1863 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War,  please  see  and  hear  the  Sec.  of  Interior  and 
Com.  of  Indian  Aff.  with  Genl.  George,  Indian  Chief  and  discharge 
such  of  the  men  as  the  chief  applies  for  &  who  have  not  received 
bounties. 

i  Copy,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  206,  Reg- 
ister notation.  The  copy  of  Lincoln's  communication  preserved  as  a  notation  on 
the  register  indicates  referral  of  petition  of  Samuel  George,  head  chief  of  the 
Six  Nations,  for  release  of  Senecas  unlawfully  enlisted. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

November  21,  1863 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War,  please  see  my  especial  friend,  Mr.  Judd,  now 
Minister  at  Berlin.,  and  who  wishes  his  son  to  go  [to]  West-Point. 
I  must  do  this  if  there  [is]  any  vacancy.  Please  ascertain,  and  let 
him  know  whether  there  is  a  vacancy.  A.  Liisrcous- 

Nov.  21.  1863. 

[27] 


NOVEMBER      22,      1863 

i  ALS,  owned  by  Mrs.  Luther  Rossiter,  Evanston,  Illinois.  Lincoln's  note  is 
written  on  both  sides  of  a  small  card.  In  reply  to  a  non-extant  letter  from  Lin- 
coln, Norman  Judd,  minister  at  Berlin,  wrote  on  October  17,  1863,  concerning 
his  son  Frank  Judd: 

"Your  kind  note  is  at  hand.  I  do  not  know  enough  of  naval  arrangements  to 
understand  whether  the  position  you  name  offers  preferment  to  the  capable  and 
industrious  or  not.  I  explained  to  you  my  situation,  and  I  believe  this  will  be 
the  turning  point  in  Frank's  life,  and  so  important  do  we  regard  it  that  Mrs.  J. 
urges  me  to  go  with  F.  to  America  and  my  inclination  is  to  do  so. 

"To  await  leave  of  absence  would  keep  me  here  a  month  and  I  am  disposed 
to  venture  upon  your  generosity  and  secure  my  leave  after  I  reach  Washing- 
ton. .  .  ." 

On  February  11,  1864,  Luther  Rossiter  wrote  Lincoln  from  Lake  Forest, 
Illinois: 

"I  have  charge  of  Hon.  N.  B.  Judds  affairs  during  his  absence.  .  .  . 

"Last  fall  when  he  was  here  you  gave  his  son  Frank  an  appointment  to  West 
Point  .  .  .  which  his  father  expected  him  to  enter  next  June. 

"I  understand  that  he  has  joined  the  eighth  Illinois  cavalry  as  a  private, 
hoping  you  would  promote  him  to  some  office  in  the  regular  army.  .  .  . 

"I  believe  also  he  has  written  you  concerning  his  appointment  at  West  Point. 

"I  hope  you  will  take  no  action  in  relation  to  it  till  you  hear  from  his  father." 
(DLC-RTL). 

Young  Judd's  career  in  the  army  seems  to  have  included  desertion,  and  re- 
enlistment  under  the  alias  of  "Frank  Judson"  in  the  Third  Massachusetts  Cav- 
alry, from  which  he  also  deserted.  See  Lincoln's  communications  to  Benjamin  F. 
Butler,  December  29,  1864,  and  to  Edward  O.  C.  Ord,  January  19,  1865. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

November  22,  1863 

The  within  is  in  behalf  of  the  family  of  Southern,  who  killed  the 
Lieutenant  and  fled.  It  is  represented  that  the  family  aro  substan- 
tially imprisoned  in  their  house  by  our  soldiers,  &  are  on  starvation. 
I  submit  that  perhaps  some  attention  better  be  given  to  the  case. 
Nov.  22.  1863  A  LINCOLN 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  from  E,  W.  Hir/.ard, 
Chicago,  November  11,  1863,  introducing  "Miss  Florence  Holcomh  of  your  rity] 
Miss  Holcomb  has  had  some  friends  arrested  under  military  authority,  one  of 
whom  is  a  young  lady  in  which  Miss  Holcomb  feels  a  very  deep  intrrest  and 
whom  she  regards  as  entirely  innocent  of  any  intentional  wrong."  Succor lin^ 
endorsements  indicate  referral  of  the  letter  to  Colonel  William  Birnev,  Camp 
Stanton,  Bryantown,  Maryland,  who  endorsed  on  December  4,  "Respy.  roturnod 
with  full  report  of  this  date."  The  report  has  not  been  found. 

Concerning  the  case  of  John  H.  Sothoron  and  son  see  Lincoln  to   Srhfiu-k 
October  21,  supra,  and  to  Stanton,  March  18,  1864,  infra. 

To  E.  E  Evans1 

E E  Evans  Executive  Mansion 

West-Union,  Adams  Co.  Ohio       Washington,  D.C.  Nov.  23.  1863 

Yours  to  Gov.  Chase  in  behalf  of  John  A.  Welch  is  before  me. 
Can  there  be  a  worse  case  than  to  desert  and  write  letters  per- 

[28] 


NOVEMBER      24,       1863 

su[a]ding  others  to  desert?  I  can-not  interpose  -without  a  better 
showing  than  you  make.  When  did  he  desert?  When  did  he  write 
the  letters?  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln's  telegram  to  the  officer  in  command  at  Covington, 
Kentucky,  December  10,  infra.  E.  P.  Evans  has  not  been  identified,  and  his  com- 
munication to  Chase  has  not  been  located. 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

Executive  Mansion, 
My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  D.C.  Nov.  23.  1863 

Two  despatches  since  I  saw  you  —  one  not  quite  so  late  on  firing 
as  we  had  before,  but  giving  the  points  that  Burnside  thinks  he  can 
hold  the  place,  that  he  is  not  closely  invested,  and  that  he  forages 
across  the  river.  The  other  brings  the  firing  up  to  11.  A.M.  yester- 
day, being  23.  hours  later  than  we  had  before.  Yours  truly 

Hon.  Sec.  of  State  A.  LINCOLIN- 

!ALS,  NAuE.  Telegrams  from  Orlando  B.  Willcox  at  Cumberland  Gap 
of  2  P.M.  and  8  P.M.,  November  22,  to  Halleck,  reported  firing  at  Knoxville  and 
information  carried  by  an  officer  on  November  20  that  Burnside  "still  holds 
out,  and  had  notified  the  citizens  of  Knoxville  that  he  would  hold  the  place." 
(OR,  I,  XXXI,  III,  225-26). 

To  Green  C.  Smith1 

Hon.  Green  Clay  Smith  Executive  Mansion, 

Covington,  Ky.  Washington,  Nov.  23,  1863. 

I  am  told  that  John  A.  Welch  is  under  sentence  as  a  deserter  to 
be  shot  at  Covington  on  the  i  ith.  of  December.  Please  bring  a  copy 
of  the  record,  and  other  facts  of  his  case,  with  you  when  you  come. 

A.  LUNTCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  from  Smith  has  been  found,  but  see  Lincoln's  telegram 
to  the  officer  in  command  at  Covington,  Kentucky,  December  to,  infra. 

To  Seth  Eastman1 

Military  Officer  in  Washington,  D.C., 

command  at  Cincinnati  O.  Nov.  24,  1863. 

Please  suspend  execution  of  sentence  against  E.  A.  Smith,  until 
further  order,  mean  time  send  me  copy  of  record  of  his  trial 

A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  found.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Seth  Eastman 
was  in  command  at  Cincinnati  as  of  October  31,  1863.  On  November  24,  Rich- 
ard M.  Corwine  telegraphed  Lincoln  from  Cincinnati:  "I  send  you  .  .  .  peti- 
tion in  behalf  of  E.  A.  Smith  just  convicted  by  a  court  martial  of  fraud  in 
horse  contracts  and  sentenced  to  pay  a  heavy  fine  &  suffer  twelve  months  im- 

[29] 


NOVEMBER     24,      1863 

prisonment.  I  was  not  his  counsel  in  the  trial,  but  have  examined  the  evidence 
and  am  satisfied  it  is  not  a  just  conviction  but  owing  to  Gen  Burnsides  absence 
no  appeal  can  be  made  to  him  &  he  has  not  seen  &  has  had  no  opportunity  to 
revise  the  proceedings  &  I  respectfully  ask  you  to  order  the  sentence  to  be  sus- 
pended until  you  can  examine  them.  If  you  do  not  make  the  order  the  sen- 
tence will  be  executed  tomorrow."  On  December  i,  1863,  Lincoln  referred  the 
petition  to  Stanton  (DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received, 
P  208),  but  the  papers  are  missing  from  the  file.  See  further  Lincoln  to  Holt, 
February  4,  and  to  Corwine,  March  30,  1864,  infra. 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  State.  Executive  Mansion 

My  dear  Sir.  Washington.  Nov.  24.  1863. 

A  despatch  from  Foster  at  Cincinnati  received  half  an  hour  ago, 
contains  one  from  Wilcox,  at  Cumberland  Gap  without  date,  say- 
ing "fighting  going  on  at  Knoxville  today."  The  want  of  date 
makes  the  time  of  fighting  uncertain,  but  I  rather  think  it  moans 
yesterday  the  23rd.  Yours  truly.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1Copy,  DLC-RTL.  The  despatch  referred  to  is  in  the  Official  Records^  I, 
XXXI,  III,  238. 

Authorization  for  Peter  H.  Watson1 

War  Department  Washington  City,  Nov  25  1863 
During  the  temporary  absence  of  the  Secretary  of  War  his  clut  ies 
will  be  performed  by  Assistant  Secretary  P  H  Watson. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 
IDS,  ORB. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

Major  Genl.  Grant  Washington,  D.C., 

Chattanooga.  Nov.  2>->  1863 

Your  despatches  as  to  fighting  on  Monday  &  Tuesday  are  here. 
Well  done.  Many  thanks  to  all.  Remember  Burnside. 

A.   Lixoor.x 

l  ALS,  RPB.  Grant  telegraphed  Halleck  on  November  23:  "General  Thomas* 
troops  attacked  the  enemy's  left  at  2  p.m.  to-day,  carried  tho  first  line  of  rifle- 
pits  running  over  the  knoll,  1,200  yards  in  front  of  Fort  Wood,  and  low  ridge  to 
the  right  of  it,  taking  about  200  prisoners,  besides  killed  and  wounded.  Our  loss 
small.  The  troops  moved  under  fire  with  all  the  precision  of  veterans  on  parade 
Thomas' troops  will  intrench  themselves,  and  hold  their  position  until  daylight 
when  Sherman  will  join  the  attack  from  the  mouth  of  the  Chicamnuea  'and  a' 
decisive  battle  will  be  fought."  (OR,  I,  XXXI,  II,  24). 

On  November  24  Grant  reported  again:  "The  fight  to-day  progressed  fa- 
vorably. Sherman  carried  the  end  of  Missionary  Ridge,  and  his  right  is  now  at 
the  tunnel,  and  left  on  Chicamauga  Creek.  Troops  from  Lookout  Valley  carried 

[30] 


DECEMBER      2,       ±863 

the  point  of  the  mountain,  and  now  hold  the  eastern  slope  and  point  high  up. 
I  cannot  yet  tell  the  amount  of  casualties,  but  our  loss  is  not  heavy.  Hooker  re- 
ports 2,000  prisoners  taken,  besides  which  a  small  number  have  fallen  into  our 
hands  from  Missionary  Ridge."  (Ibid.). 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade:  November  25,  1863. 

The  sentence  in  the  case  of  Privt.  Moses  Giles,  Company  B, 
Seventh  Maine  Volunteers,  is  suspended  until  further  orders. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  401.  No  further  reference  has  been  found. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

War  Department, 

Major-General  Meade  Washington, 

Commanding  Army  of  the  Potomac:  November  25,  1863. 

Suspend  execution  in  case  of  Adolphus  Morse,  Seventy-sixth 
New  York,  deserter,  and  send  record  to  me.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  401.  Meade  telegraphed  at  10:30  A.M.,  "Your  dis- 
patch of  today  in  relation  to  Adolphus  Morse  76  N.Y.  is  received.  The  record 
will  be  forwarded  by  mail  tomorrow."  (DLC-RTL) .  Morse's  sentence  was  com- 
muted to  imprisonment  at  hard  labor  at  Fort  Jefferson,  Florida,  where  he  sub- 
sequently died. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade:  December  2,  1863. 

The  sentence  in  the  case  of  Privt.  H.  Morris  Husband,  Ninety- 
ninth  Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  (now  of  Third  Army  Corps  First 
Division)  is  suspended  until  further  orders.  Let  the  record  be  for- 
warded to  me.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  401.  The  roster  of  Company  I  lists  Private  Henry 
M.  Husband  as  returned  on  November  2,  1864,  and  mustered  out  with  the  com- 
pany on  July  i,  1865. 

Memorandum 
on  Construction  of  Loyal  State  Governments1 

[c.  December  2,  1863] 

It  is  suggested  as  proper  that  in  constructing  a  loyal  State  govern- 
ment in  any  State,  the  name  of  the  State,  the  boundary,  the  sub- 
divisions the  Constitution  and  general  code  of  laws,  as  before  the 
rebellion,  be  maintained,  subject  only  to  the  modifications  made 
necessary  by  the  conditions  herein  before  stated,  and  such  others  if 

[31] 


DECEMBER      2,      ±863 

any,  as  may  be  deemed  proper  in  the  State,  and  not  contravening 
said  conditions. 

lADf,  DLC-RTL.  This  memorandum  is  written  on  the  back   of   Lincoln's 
draft  of  the  letter  to  Opdyke  and  others,  infra. 

To  George  Opdyke  and  Others1 

Messrs.  George  Opdyke,  Jos.  Sutherland,        Executive  Mansion, 
Benj.  F.  Manierre,  Prosper  M.  Wetmore  Washington, 

and  Spencer  Kirby,  Committee.  Dec.  2,  1863. 

Yours  of  the  a8th.  ult.  inviting  me  to  be  present  at  a  meeting  to 
be  held  at  the  Cooper  Institute,  on  the  3rd.  Inst.  to  promote  the 
raising  of  volunteers,  is  received.  Nothing  would  be  more  grateful 
to  my  feelings,  or  better  accord  with  my  judgment  than  to  con- 
tribute, if  I  could,  by  my  presence,  or  otherwise,  to  that  eminently 
patriotic  object.  Nevertheless  the  now  early  meeting  of  congress, 
together  with  a  temporary  illness,  render  my  attendance  impos- 
sible. 

You  purpose  also  to  celebrate  our  Western  victories.  Freed  from 
apprehension  of  wounding  the  just  sensibilities  of  brave  soldiers 
fighting  elsewhere,  it  would  be  exceedingly  agreeable  to  me  to  join 
in  a  suitable  acknowledgment  to  those  of  the  Great  West,  with 
whom  I  was  born,  and  have  passed  my  life.  And  it  is  exceedingly 
gratifying  that  a  portion  lately  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  but 
now  serving  with  the  great  army  of  the  West,  have  borne  so  con- 
spicuous a  part  in  the  late  brilliant  triumphs  in  Georgia. 

Honor  to  the  Soldier,  and  Sailor  every  where,  who  bravely  bears 
his  country's  cause.  Honor  also  to  the  citizen  who  cares  for  his 
brother  in  the  field,  and  serves,  as  he  best  can,  the  same  cause — 
honor  to  him,  only  less  than  to  him,  who  braves,  for  the  common 
good,  the  storms  of  heaven  and  the  storms  of  battle.  Your  Obt.  Servt 

A.  LIN co LIST 

1  ADf,  DLC-RTL;  LS,  IHi.  The  committee's  letter  of  November  28  sp'u-ifii*s 
no  more  than  is  paraphrased  in  Lincoln's  reply  (DLC-RTL).  Lincoln's  <Inift 
of  this  letter  is  on  the  back  of  the  same  sheet  as  his  memorandum,  supra. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Meade,  Washington,  December  3,  1863. 

Governor  Seymour  especially  asks  that  Isaac  C.  White  sentenced 
to  death  for  desertion  be  reprieved.  I  wish  this  done. 

(signed)  John  Hay,  A.  LINCOLN. 

a  Private  Secretary. 

[32] 


DECEMBER      3,       1863 

iCopy,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1142.  This  offi- 
cial copy  attested  by  Edward  D.  Townsend  is  filed  with  the  court-martial  record 
of  Private  Isaac  C.  White  of  the  Sixty-first  New  York  Volunteers,  sentenced  for 
desertion.  No  further  reference  has  been  found. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major-General  Meade:  Washington,  December  3,  1863. 

Please  suspend  execution  of  Frederick  Foster  until  the  record  can 
be  examined.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  402.  Meade's  telegram  in  reply  was  received  at  2:10 
P.M.:  "Your  dispatch  of  today  in  relation  to  Private  Frederick  Foster  ninety- 
ninth  (ggth)  Penna.  Volunteers,  is  received  and  has  been  obeyed.  The  record 
will  be  forwarded  for  your  action  by  mail  tomorrow."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  General  Meade,  [December  3,  1863] 

The  sentences  in  the  cases  of  Brice  Birdsill,  private,  Co.  B,  124th 
N.Y.  Vols.,  and  Frederick  Foster  of  ggth  Penn.  Vols.  are  suspended 
until  further  orders.  Let  the  records  be  forwarded  at  once. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

iCopy,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1147.  This  official 
copy  attested  by  Edward  D.  Townsend,  filed  with  court-martial  record  of  Private 
Brice  E.  Birdsall,  is  without  date,  but  Meade's  reply  received  at  4:40  P.M.  on 
December  3,  1863,  establishes  the  date:  "Your  dispatch  of  today  in  relation  to 
Privates  Birdsall  &  Foster  is  reed.  In  obedience  to  a  previous  dispatch  from  you 
the  sentence  in  the  case  of  Foster  has  already  been  suspended  That  in  the  case 
of  Birdsall  will  be  suspended  &  the  records  forwarded  for  your  action"  (DLC- 
RTL). 

Private  Frederick  Foster  remained  in  service  and  was  discharged  on  April  22, 
1865.  BirdsalFs  record  was  returned  to  the  War  Department  on  April  16,  1864, 
under  the  order  of  February  26,  1864,  commuting  death  sentences  for  deserters 
to  imprisonment  on  the  Dry  Tortugas. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major-General  Meade:  Washington,  December  3,  1863. 

Please  suspend  execution  in  case  of  William  A.  Gammon,  Sev- 
enth Maine,  and  send  record  to  me.  A. 


Send  by  telegraph  and  oblige,  yours  very  truly,        JOHN  HAY. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix)  p.  402.  Meade  replied  on  December  4:  "Your  despatch 
of  today  relating  to  private  W.  A.  Gammon  7th.  Maine  is  rec'd  &  will  be 
obliged.  The  record  will  be  forwarded  by  mail  tomorrow  for  your  action." 


DECEMBER      4,      ±863 

(DLC-RTL).  Lincoln  returned  the  record  of  Gammon's  case  to  the  War  De- 
partment on  April  16,  1864,  under  the  order  of  February  26,  1864.,  commuting 
death  sentences  for  deserters  to  imprisonment  on  the  Dry  Tortugas. 

To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A.  Lincoln.  Executive  Mansion, 

Metropolitan,  N.Y.  Washington,  Dec.  4.  9^  AM,  1863. 

All  going  well.          A  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  IHi.  The  case  of  varioloid  which  Lincoln  contracted  following  the 
trip  to  Gettysburg  continued  well  into  December  and  probably  accounts  for 
the  series  of  telegrams  sent  to  Mrs.  Lincoln,  December  4-7.  Mrs.  Lincoln 
telegraphed  on  December  4:  "Reached  here  last  evening.  Very  tired  and  srvero 
headache.  Hope  to  hear  you  are  doing  well.  Expect  a  telegraph  to-day." 
(Katherine  Helm,  Mary,  Wife  of  Lincoln,  p.  234). 

To  Stephen  C.  Massett1 

Mr.  Stephen  C.  Massett.  Washington,  Dec.  4,  1863 

My  Dear  Sir:  Allow  me  to  thank  you  very  cordially  for  your 
kindness  in  sending  me  a  copy  of  your  book,  "Drifting  About."  I 
am  very  truly,  Your  Obed't  Serv't,  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

1  Tracy,  p.  236.  Stephen  C.  Massett,  a  forty-niner  from  San  Francisco,  pub- 
lished "Drifting  About";  or,  What  "Jeems  Pipes,  of  PipesvillcJ9  Saw-ant!  Did 
(New  York,  1863),  a  comic  autobiography  which  Massett  delivered  as  "lec- 
tures," and  on  one  occasion  presented  in  part  to  President  and  Mrs.  Lincoln  at 
the  White  House  (Carpenter,  Six  Months  at  the  White  House,  pp.  160-61). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

December  4,  1 863 

Hon.  B.  J.  Clay  and  Hon.  G.  C.  Smith  present  this  petition  and  join 
in  it.  Therefore  let  Clifton  F.  Estill,  named  within,  be  dischargocL 
on  the  conditions  stated.  A.  LINCOT.IST. 

Dec.  4.  1863 

1 AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  petition  to  Governor 
Bramlette  of  Kentucky  for  release  of  Clifton  F.  Estill  "a  prisonor  of  war  at 
Camp  Douglas  being  a  private  of  John  Morgan's  command  captured  in  Ohio," 
whose  mother  was  "one  of  the  most  active  Union  ladies"  in  Fayottc  County 
signed  by  numerous  citizens  and  by  Brutus  J.  Clay  and  Green  C." Smith,  mem- 
bers of  congress.  No  further  reference  has  been  found. 

To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A.  Lincoln  Executive  Mansion,  Washington 

Metropolitan  Hotel.  New- [York]  Dec.  5.  10  A.M.  1863. 

All  doing  well         A.  LINCOLN 

IALS,  ras. 

[34] 


To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A  Lincoln.  Executive  Mansion  Washington, 

Metropolitan  Hotel  N.Y.  DC.  Dec.  6.  1863. 

All  doing  well         A  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  IHi.  Mrs.  Lincoln  telegraphed  on  December  6:  "Do  let  me  know  im- 
mediately how  Taddie  and  yourself  are.  I  will  be  home  by  Tuesday  without 
fail;  sooner  if  needed."  (Katherine  Helm,  Mary,  Wife  of  Lincoln,  p.  234). 

Announcement  of  Union  Success  in  Tennessee1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington  D.C.  Dec.  7-  1863 
Reliable  information  being  received  that  the  insurgent  force  is 
retreating  from  East  Tennessee,  under  circumstances  rendering  it 
probable  that  the  Union  forces  can  not  hereafter  be  dislodged  from 
that  important  position;  and  esteeming  this  to  be  of  high  national 
consequence,  I  recommend  that  all  loyal  people  do,  on  receipt  of 
this,  informally  assemble  at  their  places  of  worship  and  tender 
special  homage  and  gratitude  to  Almighty  God,  for  this  great  ad- 
vancement of  the  national  cause.  A  LINCOLN 

1  ADS,  MH.  This  press  release  probably  refers  to  General  Grant's  despatch 
to  Halleck,  4:30  P.M.,  December  6,  "Dispatch  just  received  from  General  Foster 
indicates  beyond  a  doubt  that  Longstreet  is  retreating  toward  Virginia.  I  have 
directed  him  to  be  well  followed  up."  (OR,  I,  XXXI,  III,  345). 

To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A  Lincoln  Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

Metropolitan  Hotel,  N.Y.  Dec.  7.  10/20  AM.  1863. 

All  doing  well.  Tad  confidently  expects  you  to-night.  When  will 
you  come?  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  Mrs.  Lincoln  replied:  "Will  leave  here  positively  at  8  a.m. 
Tuesday  morning.  Have  carriage  waiting  at  depot  in  Washington  at  6  p.m.  Did 
Tad  receive  his  book.  Please  answer."  (Katherine  Helm,  Mary,  Wife  of  Lincoln,, 
p.  235).  See  Lincoln's  telegram  of  7  P.M.,  infra. 

To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A.  Lincoln  Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

Metropolitan  Hotel  N.Y.  Dec.  7.    7  P.M.  1863. 

Tad  has  received  his  book.  The  carriage  shall  be  ready  at  6.  PM. 
tomorrow.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  IHi. 

[35] 


Annual  Message  to  Congress1 

December  8,  1863 
Fellow  citizens  of  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives: 

Another  year  of  health,  and  of  sufficiently  abundant  harvests  has 
passed.  For  these,  and  especially  for  the  improved  condition  of  our 
national  affairs,  our  renewed,  and  profoundest  gratitude  to  God  is 
due. 

We  remain  in  peace  and  friendship  with  foreign  powers. 

The  efforts  of  disloyal  citizens  of  the  United  States  to  involve 
us  in  foreign  wars,  to  aid  an  inexcusable  insurrection,  have  been 
unavailing.  Her  Britannic  Majesty's  government,  as  was  justly 
expected,  have  exercised  their  authority  to  prevent  the  departure 
of  new  hostile  expeditions  from  British  ports.  The  Emperor  of 
France  has,  by  a  like  proceeding,  promptly  vindicated  the  neutral- 
ity which  he  proclaimed  at  the  beginning  of  the  contest.  Questions 
of  great  intricacy  and  importance  have  arisen  out  of  the  blockade, 
and  other  belligerent  operations,  between  the  government  and  sev- 
eral of  the  maritime  powers,  but  they  have  been  discussed,  and,  as 
far  as  was  possible,  accommodated  in  a  spirit  of  frankness,  just  ice, 
and  mutual  good  will.  It  is  especially  gratifying  that  our  pri'/.e 
courts,  by  the  impartiality  of  their  adjudications,  have  commanded 
the  respect  and  confidence  of  maritime  powers. 

The  supplemental  treaty  between  the  United  States  arid  Great 
Britain  for  the  suppression  of  the  African  slave  trade,  made  on  the 
i/th.  day  of  February  last,  has  been  duly  ratified,  and  carried  into 
execution.2  It  is  believed  that,  so  far  as  American  ports  and  Amer- 
ican citizens  are  concerned,  that  inhuman  and  odious  traffic  has 
been  brought  to  an  end. 

I  shall  submit,  for  the  consideration  of  the  Senate,  a  convent  inn 
for  the  adjustment  of  possessory  claims  in  Washington  Territory, 
arising  out  of  the  treaty  of  the  15th.  June,  1846,  between  the 
United  States  and  Great  Britain,  and  which  have  been  the  source 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  House  of  Repre- 
sentatives Executive  Document  No.  i;  ADf  (partial),  DLC-IVTL.  The  prelim- 
inary draft,  partly  in  Lincoln's  autograph  but  incomplete  and  differing   from 
the  official  signed  copy  in  numerous  instances,  indicates   that  considerable   re- 
vision took  place  before  the  official  copy  was  made.   No  intervening   draft   or 
copy,  however,  has  been  located.  The  official  copy  generally  follows  the  draft 
in  matters  of  style  but  differs  in  order  of  passages  and  in  portions  which  were 
added  later  than  the  text  of  the  draft.  There  are  also  certain  passages   in   the 
draft  which  were  omitted  in  the  official  copy  and  in  the  printed  text.    (Thirty- 
eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  House  of  Representatives  Executive  Document 
No.  *).  These  omitted  passages  have  been  given  in  succeeding  footnotes,  as  they 
occur.  For  the  various  reports  of  cabinet  members  submitted  with  this  message 
and  to  which  Lincoln  makes  repeated  reference,  see  Executive  Document  >\o.  i. 

2  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate,  February   18,  supra. 

[36] 


DECEMBER      8,       ±863 

of  some  disquiet  among  the  citizens  of  that  now  rapidly  improving 
part  of  the  country.8 

A  novel  and  important  question,  involving  the  extent  of  the 
maritime  jurisdiction  of  Spain  in  the  waters  which  surround  the 
island  of  Cuba,  has  been  debated  without  reaching  an  agreement, 
and  it  is  proposed  in  an  amicable  spirit  to  refer  it  to  the  arbitrament 
of  a  friendly  power.  A  convention  for  that  purpose  will  be  sub- 
mitted to  the  Senate.4 

I  have  thought  it  proper,  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  Senate, 
to  concur  with  the  interested  commercial  powers  in  an  arrange- 
ment for  the  liquidation  of  the  Scheldt  dues  upon  the  principles 
which  have  been  heretofore  adopted  in  regard  to  the  imposts  upon 
navigation  in  the  waters  of  Denmark.5 

The  long  pending  controversy  between  this  government  and  that 
of  Chili  touching  the  seizure  at  Sitana,  in  Peru,  by  Chilian  officers, 
of  a  large  amount  in  treasure  belonging  to  citizens  of  the  United 
States,  has  been  brought  to  a  close  by  the  award  of  His  Majesty, 
the  King  of  the  Belgians,  to  whose  arbitration  the  question  was  re- 
ferred by  the  parties.6  The  subject  was  thoroughly  and  patiently 
examined  by  that  justly  respected  magistrate,  and  although  the 
sum  awarded  to  the  claimants  may  not  have  been  as  large  as  they 
expected,  there  is  no  reason  to  distrust  the  wisdom  of  his  Majesty's 
decision.  That  decision  was  promptly  complied  with  by  Chili,  when 
intelligence  in  regard  to  it  reached  that  country. 

The  joint  commission,  under  the  act  of  the  last  session,  for  carry- 
ing into  effect  the  convention  with  Peru  on  the  subject  of  claims, 
has  been  organized  at  Lima,  and  is  engaged  in  the  business  in- 
trusted to  it.7 

Difficulties  concerning  inter-oceanic  transit  through  Nicaragua 
are  in  course  of  amicable  adjustment.8 

In  conformity  with  principles  set  forth  in  my  last  annual  mes- 
sage, I  have  received  a  representative  from  the  United  States  of 
Colombia,  and  have  accredited  a  minister  to  that  republic.9 

3  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate,  December  1 7,  infra. 

4  No  convention  seems  to  have  been  submitted.  The   current  dispute  arose 
when  the  U.S.S.  Reaney  was  stopped  six  miles  out  of  Havana  by  a  Spanish 
warship  on  January  23,  1863. 

5  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate,  December  22,   infra. 

6  See  Lincoln's  letter  to  Leopold,  June  13,  supra. 

7  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate,  February  5,  supra. 

8  The  Nicaraguan   revolution   of    1863   had   increased  existing  difficulties   of 
transit  across  the  Isthmus  of  Panama  on  the  inter-ocean  route  from  New  York 
to  California  and  return. 

9  Following  the  revolution  in  1863,  New  Granada  became  the  United  States 
of  Colombia.  Eustorgio  Salgar  was  accredited  minister  to  the  United  States,  and 
Allen  A.  Burton,  U.S.  minister  to  Colombia. 

[37] 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

Incidents  occurring  in  the  progress  of  our  civil  war  have  forced 
upon  my  attention  the  uncertain  state  of  international  questions, 
touching  the  rights  of  foreigners  in  this  country  and  of  United 
States  citizens  abroad.10  In  regard  to  some  governments  these 
rights  are  at  least  partially  defined  by  treaties.  In  no  instance,  how- 
ever, is  it  expressly  stipulated  that,  in  the  event  of  civil  war,  a 
foreigner  residing  in  this  country,  within  the  lines  of  the  insur- 
gents, is  to  be  exempted  from  the  rule  which  classes  him  as  a 
belligerent,  in  whose  behalf  the  government  of  his  country  cannot 
expect  any  privileges  or  immunities  distinct  from  that  character. 
I  regret  to  say,  however,  that  such  claims  have  been  put  forward, 
and,  in  some  instances,  in  behalf  of  foreigners  who  have  lived  in 
the  United  States  the  greater  part  of  their  lives. 

There  is  reason  to  believe  that  many  persons  born  in  foreign 
countries,  who  have  declared  their  intention  to  become  citizens,  or 
who  have  been  fully  naturalized,  have  evaded  the  military  duty 
required  of  them  by  denying  the  fact,  and  thereby  throwing  upon 
the  government  the  burden  of  proof.  It  has  been  found  difficult  or 
impracticable  to  obtain  this  proof  from  the  want  of  guides  to  the 
proper  sources  of  information.  These  might  be  supplied  by  requir- 
ing clerks  of  courts,  where  declarations  of  intention  may  be  rnado 
or  naturalizations  effected,  to  send,  periodically.,  lists  of  the  names 
of  the  persons  naturalized,  or  declaring  their  intention  to  become 
citizens,  to  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  in  whose  department  those 
names  might  be  arranged  and  printed  for  general  information. 

There  is  also  reason  to  believe  that  foreigners  frequently  become 
citizens  of  the  United  States  for  the  sole  purpose  of  evading  duties 
imposed  by  the  laws  of  their  native  countries,  to  which,  on  becom- 
ing naturalized  here,  they  at  once  repair,  and  though  never  re- 
turning to  the  United  States,  they  still  claim  the  interposition  of 
this  government  as  citizens.  Many  altercations  and  great  prejudices 
have  heretofore  arisen  out  of  this  abuse.  It  is  therefore,  submitted  to 
your  serious  consideration.  It  might  be  advisable  to  fix  a  limit,  be- 
yond which  no  Citizen  of  the  United  States  residing  abroad  may 
claim  the  interposition  of  his  government.11 

The  right  of  suffrage  has  often  been  assumed  and  exercised  by 
aliens,  under  pretences  of  naturalization,  which  they  have  dis- 
avowed when  drafted  into  the  military  service.  I  submit  the  ex- 
pediency of  such  an  amendment  of  the  law  as  will  make  the  fact 
of  voting  an  estoppel  against  any  plea  of  exemption  from  military 

10  See  Lincoln's  proclamation  of  May  8,  supra. 

11  No  action  on  this  suggestion  seems  to  have  been  taken  by  this  session  of 
congress. 

[38] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 
service,  or  other  civil  obligation,  on  the  ground  of  alienage.12 

In  common  with  other  western  powers,  our  relations  with  Japan 
have  been  brought  into  serious  jeopardy,  through  the  perverse  op- 
position of  the  hereditary  aristocracy  of  the  empire,  to  the  enlight- 
ened and  liberal  policy  of  the  Tycoon  designed  to  bring  the  country 
into  the  society  of  nations.  It  is  hoped,  although  not  with  entire 
confidence,  that  these  difficulties  may  be  peacefully  overcome.  I 
ask  your  attention  to  the  claim  of  the  Minister  residing  there  for 
the  damages  he  sustained  in  the  destruction  by  fire  of  the  residence 
of  the  legation  at  Yedo.13 

Satisfactory14  arrangements  have  been  made  with  the  Emperor 
of  Russia,  which,  it  is  believed,  will  resxilt  in  effecting  a  continuous 
line  of  telegraph  through  that  empire  from  our  Pacific  coast.15 

I  recommend  to  your  favorable  consideration  the  subject  of  an 
international  telegraph  across  the  Atlantic  ocean;  and  also  of  a 
telegraph  between  this  capital  and  the  national  forts  along  the  At- 
lantic seaboard  and  the  Gulf  of  Mexico.10  Such  communications, 
established  with  any  reasonable  outlay,  would  be  economical  as 
well  as  effective  aids  to  the  diplomatic,  military,  and  naval  service. 

The  consular  system  of  the  United  States,  under  the  enactments 
of  the  last  Congress,  begins  to  be  self -sustaining;17  and  there  is 

12  An  act  to  amend  the  "act  for  enrolling  and  calling  out  the  National  Forces" 
of  March   3,    1863,   approved   February   24,    1864,   provided  that  no  person  of 
foreign  birth  should  be  exempted  from  the  enrollment  who  had  held  office  or 
voted  in  any  election  held  under  the  laws  of  a  state  or  territory. 

13  The  American  legation  at  Yedo  was  destroyed  by  fire  on  May  24,   1863. 
Incendiarism  was  suspected.  On  September  i,   1863,  Secretary  Seward  directed 
Robert  H.  Pruyn,  minister  to  Japan,  to  submit  losses  by  himself  and  his  staff. 
No  action  seems  to  have  been  taken  at  this  session  of  congress. 

14  Deleted  from  the  message  before  the  official  copy  was  made,  the  following 
passage  appears  in  tho  preliminary  draft,  just  preceding  this  sentence:   "There 
are  indications  that  the  establishment  of  commercial  steam  lines  of  communica- 
tion with  the  ports  of  Spanish  America  and  Brazil,  would  be  rewarded  with  a 
large   increase   of  commerce;    and   the   growth   of  strong,   sincere   and   reliable 
national  attachments  throughout  the  States  of  Central  and  Southern  America. 
The  policy,  though  less  essential,  might  be  advantageously  extended  to  the  com- 
mercial states  of  Western  Europe." 

ir>  An  act  approved  July  i,  1864,  "to  facilitate  Telegraphic  communication 
botweoii  the  Eastern  and  Western  Continents,"  gave  to  Perry  M.  Collins  of 
California  the  right  to  construct  lines  north  to  Canada  and  authorized  the  Army 
and  Navy  to  aid  Collins'  concern,  the  Russian  and  American  Telegraph  Com- 
pany, chartered  to  construct  a  line  from  the  Amur  River  across  the  Bering  Sea 
and  to  San  Francisco. 

16  The  act  approved  June  15,  1864,  for  Army  appropriations,  provided 
$27^,000  for  construction,  extension,  and  operation  of  the  telegraph. 

IT  Lincoln  may  refer  to  the  act  of  March  3,  1863,  "to  prevent  and  punish 
frauds  upon  the?  revenue,"  which  stipulated  that  all  goods  exported  to  the  U.S. 
must  be  invoiced  and  a  certificate  issued  by  the  consul  at  the  port  from  which 
shipment  was  made,  thereby  increasing  collection  of  import  duties. 

[39] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 

reason  to  hope  that  it  may  become  entirely  so,  with  the  increase  of 
trade  which  will  ensue  whenever  peace  is  restored.  Our  ministers 
abroad  have  been  faithful  in  defending  American  rights.  In  pro- 
tecting commercial  interests,  our  Consuls  have  necessarily  had  to 
encounter  increased  labors  and  responsibilities,  growing  out  of  the 
war.  These  they  have,  for  the  most  part,  met  and  discharged  with 
zeal  and  efficiency.  This  acknowledgment  justly  includes  those  Con- 
suls who,  residing  in  Morocco,  Egypt,  Turkey,  Japan,  China,  and 
other  oriental  countries,  are  charged  with  complex  functions  and 
extraordinary  powers. 

The  condition  of  the  several  organized  Territories  is  generally 
satisfactory,  although  Indian  disturbances  in  New  Mexico  have 
not  been  entirely  suppressed.  The  mineral  resources  of  Colorado, 
Nevada,  Idaho,  New  Mexico,  and  Arizona  are  proving  far  richer 
than  has  been  heretofore  understood.  I  lay  before  you  a  communi- 
cation on  this  subject  from  the  governor  of  New  Mexico.1*  I  again 
submit  to  your  consideration  the  expediency  of  establishing  a  sys- 
tem for  the  encouragement  of  immigration.  Although  this  source 
of  national  wealth  and  strength  is  again  flowing  with  greater  free- 
dom than  for  several  years  before  the  insurrection  occurred,  there 
is  still  a  great  deficiency  of  laborers  in  every  field  of  industry,  es- 
pecially in  agriculture  and  in  our  mines,  as  well  of  iron  and  roal 
as  of  the  precious  metals.  While  the  demand  for  labor  is  thus  in- 
creased here,  tens  of  thousands  of  persons,  destitute  of  remunera- 
tive occupation,  are  thronging  our  foreign  consulates,  and  offering 
to  emigrate  to  the  United  States  if  essential,  but  very  cheap,  assist- 
ance can  be  afforded  them.  It  is  easy  to  see  that,  under  the  sharp 
discipline  of  civil  war,  the  nation  is  beginning  a  new  life.  This  rmMe 
effort  demands  the  aid,  and  ought  to  receive  the  attention  ami  sup- 
port of  the  government.19 

Injuries,  unforseen  by  the  government  and  unintended,  may. 
in  some  cases,  have  been  inflicted  on  the  subjects  or  riti/.ens  of 
foreign  countries,  both  at  sea  and  on  land,  by  persons  in  the  service 
of  the  United  States.  As  this  government  expects  redress  f  mm  other 
powers  when  similar  injuries  are  inflicted  by  persons  in  their  serv- 
ice upon  citizens  of  the  United  States,  we  must  be  prepared  to  do 
justice  to  foreigners.  If  the  existing  judicial  tribunals  are  inade- 
quate to  this  purpose,  a  special  court  may  be  authorized,  with 
power  to  hear  and  decide  such  claims  of  the  character  referred  to 
as  may  have  arisen  under  treaties  and  the  public  law.  Conventions 

18  On  August  23,  1863,  Governor  Henry  Connelly  of  Now  Mexico  Territory 
reported  to  Secretary  Seward  on  the  discovery  of  gold  fields  in  Arizona 
"An  act  to  encourage  immigration  was  approved  on  July  .j.,   iS6.j,. 

[40] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 

for  adjusting  the  claims  by  joint  commission  have  been  proposed 
to  some  governments,  but  no  definitive  answer  to  the  proposition 
has  yet  been  received  from  any. 

In  the  course  of  the  session  I  shall  probably  have  occasion  to  re- 
quest you  to  provide  indemnification  to  claimants  where  decrees 
of  restitution  have  been  rendered,  and  damages  awarded  by  ad- 
miralty courts;  and  in  other  cases  where  this  government  may 
be  acknowledged  to  be  liable  in  principle,  and  where  the  amount  of 
that  liability  has  been  ascertained  by  an  informal  arbitration. 

The  proper  officers  of  the  treasury  have  deemed  themselves  re- 
quired, by  the  law  of  the  United  States  upon  the  subject,  to  demand 
a  tax  upon  the  incomes  of  foreign  consuls  in  this  country.  While 
such  a  demand  may  not,  in  strictness,  be  in  derogation  of  public 
law,  or  perhaps  of  any  existing  treaty  between  the  United  States 
and  a  foreign  country,  the  expediency  of  so  far  modifying  the  act 
as  to  exempt  from  tax  the  income  of  such  consuls  as  are  not  citizens 
of  the  United  States,  derived  from  the  emoluments  of  their  office, 
or  from  property  not  situated  in  the  United  States,  is  submitted  to 
your  serious  consideration.20  I  make  this  suggestion  upon  the 
ground  that  a  comity  which  ought  to  be  reciprocated  exempts  our 
Consuls,  in  all  other  countries,  from  taxation  to  the  extent  thus  in- 
dicated. The  United  States,  I  think,  ought  not  to  be  exceptionally 
illiberal  to  international  trade  and  commerce. 

The  operations  of  the  treasury  during  the  last  year  have  been 
successfully  conducted.  The  enactment  by  Congress  of  a  national 
banking  law21  has  proved  a  valuable  support  of  the  public  credit; 
and  the  general  legislation  in  relation  to  loans  has  fully  answered 
the  expectations  of  its  favorers.  Some  amendments  may  be  re- 
quired to  perfect  existing  laws;  but  no  change  in  their  principles 
or  general  scope  is  believed  to  be  needed. 

Since  these  measures  have  been  in  operation,  all  demands  on  the 
treasury,  including  the  pay  of  the  army  and  navy,  have  been 
promptly  met  and  fully  satisfied.  No  considerable  body  of  troops, 
it  is  believed,  were  ever  more  amply  provided,  and  more  liberally 
and  punctually  paid;  and  it  may  be  added  that  by  no  people  were 
the  burdens  incident  to  a  great  war  ever  more  cheerfully  borne. 

The  receipts  during  the  year  from  all  sources,  including  loans 
and  the  balance  in  the  treasury  at  its  commencement,  were 
$901,125,674  86,  and  the  aggregate  disbursements  $895,796,630.65, 
leaving  a  balance  on  the  ist.  July,  1863,  of  $5,329,044.21.  Of  the 

20  Section  8  of  the  act  "to  increase  the  Internal  Revenue,"  approved  on  March 
7,   1864,  provided  exemption  for  foreign  consuls. 

21  The  act  of  February  25,  1863. 

[41] 


DECEMBER     8,      1863 

receipts  there  were  derived  from  customs,  $69,059,642.40;  from 
internal  revenue,  $37,640,787.95;  from  direct  tax,  $1,485,103.61; 
from  lands,  $167,617.17;  from  miscellaneous  sources,  $3,046,615.- 
35;  and  from  loans,  $776,682,361.57;  making  the  aggregate,  $901,- 
125,674.86.  Of  the  disbursements  there  were  for  the  civil  service, 
$23,253,922.08;  for  pensions  and  Indians,  $4,216,520.79;  for  in- 
terest on  public  debt,  $24,729,846.5 1;22  for  the  War  Department, 
$599,298,600.83;  for  the  Navy  Department,  $63,211,105.27;  for 
payment  of  funded  and  temporary  debt,  $181,086,635.07;  making 
the  aggregate,  $895,796,630.65,  and  leaving  the  balance  of  $5,329*- 
044.21.  But  the  payment  of  funded  and  temporary  debt,  having 
been  made  from  moneys  borrowed  during  the  year,  must  be  re- 
garded as  merely  nominal  payments,  and  the  moneys  borrowed  to 
make  them  as  merely  nominal  receipts;  and  their  amount,  $181,- 
086,635  07,  should  therefore  be  deducted  both  from  receipts  and 
disbursements.  This  being  done,  there  remains  as  actual  receipts 
$720,039,039.79;  and  the  actual  disbursements,  $7i4?709r99'5-58, 
leaving  the  balance  as  already  stated. 

The  actual  receipts  and  disbursements  for  the  first  qxiarter,  and 
the  estimated  receipts  and  disbursements  for  the  remaining  three 
quarters,  of  the  current  fiscal  year,  1864,  will  be  shown  in  detail 
by  the  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Treasury,  to  which  I  invite 
your  attention.  It  is  sufficient  to  say  here  that  it  is  not  believed  that 
actual  results  will  exhibit  a  state  of  the  finances  less  favorable  to 
the  country  than  the  estimates  of  that  officer  heretofore  submitted; 
while  it  is  confidently  expected  that  at  the  close  of  the  year  both 
disbursements  and  debt  will  be  found  very  considerably  less  than 
has  been  anticipated. 

The  report  of  the  Secretary  of  War  is  a  document  of  great  inter- 
est. It  consists  of — 

1.  The  military  operations  of  the  year,  detailed  in  the  report  of 
the  general-in-chief. 

2.  The  organization  of  colored  persons  into  the  war  service. 

3.  The  exchange  of  prisoners,  fully  set  forth  in  the  letter  of  Gen- 
eral Hitchcock. 

4.  The  operations  under  the  act  for  enrolling  and  calling  out 
the  national  forces,  detailed  in  the  report  of  the  provost  marshal 
general. 

5.  The  organization  of  the  invalid  corps;  and 

6.  The  operation  of  the  several  departments  of  the  quartermaster 
general,  commissary  general,  paymaster  general,  chief  of  engi- 
neers, chief  of  ordnance,  and  surgeon  general. 

22  This  figure  reads  "$24.729.846.61"  in  the  preliminary  draft. 

[42] 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

It  has  appeared  impossible  to  make  a  valuable  summary  of  this 
report  except  such  as  would  be  too  extended  for  this  place,  and 
hence  I  content  myself  by  asking  your  careful  attention  to  the  re- 
port itself.23 

The  duties  devolving  on  the  naval  branch  of  the  service  during 
the  year,  and  throughout  the  whole  of  this  unhappy  contest,  have 
been  discharged  with  fidelity  and  eminent  success.  The  extensive 
blockade  has  been  constantly  increasing  in  efficiency,  as  the  navy 
has  expanded;  yet  on  so  long  a  line  it  has  so  far  been  impossible  to 
entirely  suppress  illicit  trade.  From  returns  received  at  the  Navy 
Department,  it  appears  that  more  than  one  thousand  vessels  have 
been  captured  since  the  blockade  was  instituted,  and  that  the  value 
of  prizes  already  sent  in  for  adjudication  amounts  to  over  thirteen 
millions  of  dollars. 

The  naval  force  of  the  United  States  consists  at  this  time  of  five 
hundred  and  eighty-eight  vessels,  completed  and  in  the  course  of 
completion,  and  of  these  seventy-five  are  iron-clad  or  armored 
steamers.24  The  events  of  the  -war  give  an  increased  interest  and 
importance  to  the  navy  which  will  probably  extend  beyond  the 
war  itself. 

The  armored  vessels  in  our  navy  completed  and  in  service,  or 
which  are  under  contract  and  approaching  completion,  are  believed 
to  exceed  in  number  those  of  any  other  power.  But  while  these  may 
be  relied  upon  for  harbor  defence  and  coast  service,  others  of 
greater  strength  and  capacity  will  be  necessary  for  cruising  pur- 
poses, and  to  maintain  our  rightful  position  on  the  ocean. 

The  change  that  has  taken  place  in  naval  vessels  and  naval  war- 
fare, since  the  introduction  of  steam  as  a  motive-power  for  ships-of- 
war,  demands  either  a  corresponding  change  in  some  of  our  existing 
navy  yards,  or  the  establishment  of  new  ones,  for  the  construction 
and  necessary  repair  of  modern  naval  vessels.  No  inconsider- 

28  See  House  of  Representatives  Executive  Document  No.  *9  V,  3-510. 

24  The  next  sentence  replaced  a  long  passage  in  the  preliminary  draft  -which 
read  as  follows:  "As  this  government  is  destined  to  occupy  a  leading  position 
among  maratirne  powers  it  is  a  primary  duty  to  provide  the  means  and  adequate 
establishments  for  a  navy  commensurate  with  its  wants.  The  improvements 
which  have  been  made  in  naval  architecture  and  naval  armament,  and  the 
services  which  the  new  class  of  vessels  have  already  rendered  and  are  destined 
hereafter  to  perform  are  among  the  marked  events  which  have  their  origin  in 
the  exigencies  of  the  war  and  the  necessities  of  the  times.  Other  governments 
have  been  making  large  expenditures  for  years  in  experiments  -with  a  view  to 
attain  naval  supremacy,  but  the  condition  of  the  country  and  the  emergencies 
of  the  period  have  stimulated  the  inventive  genius  of  our  countrymen  into 
great  activity,  and  the  Navy  Department,  successfully  availing  itself  of  what 
was  useful,  has  applied  with  effect  the  novel  principles  which  modern  in- 
ventions and  improvements  have  developed." 

[43] 


DECEMBER      8,       ±863 

able  embarrassment,  delay,  and  public  injury  have  been  ex- 
perienced from  the  want  of  such  governmental  establishments.  The 
necessity  of  such  a  navy  yard,  so  furnished,  at  some  suitable  place 
upon  the  Atlantic  seaboard,  has  on  repeated  occasions  been  brought 
to  the  attention  of  Congress  by  the  Navy  Department,  and  is  again 
presented  in  the  report  of  the  Secretary  which  accompanies  this 
communication.  I  think  it  my  duty  to  invite  your  special  attention 
to  this  subject,  and  also  to  that  of  establishing  a  yard  and  depot 
for  naval  purposes  upon  one  of  the  western  rivers.25  A  naval  force 
has  been  created  on  those  interior  waters,  and  under  many  disad- 
vantages, within  little  more  than  two  years,  exceeding  in  numbers 
the  whole  naval  force  of  the  country  at  the  commencement  of  the 
present  administration.  Satisfactory  and  important  as  have  been 
the  performances  of  the  heroic  men  of  the  navy  at  this  interesting 
period,  they  are  scarcely  more  wonderful  than  the  success  of  our 
mechanics  and  artisans  in  the  production  of  war  vessels  which  has 
created  a  new  form  of  naval  power. 

Our  country  has  advantages  superior  to  any  other  nation  in  our 
resources  of  iron  and  timber,  with  inexhaustible  quantities  of  fuel 
in  the  immediate  vicinity  of  both,  and  all  available  and  in  close 
proximity  to  navigable  waters.  Without  the  advantage  of  public 
works  the  resources  of  the  nation  have  been  developed  and  its 
power  displayed  in  the  construction  of  a  navy  of  such  magnitude 
which  has,  at  the  very  period  of  its  creation,  rendered  signal  service 
to  the  Union. 

The  increase  of  the  number  of  seamen  in  the  public  service,  from 
seven  thousand  five  hundred  men,  in  the  spring  of  1861,  to  about 
thirty  four  thousand  at  the  present  time  has  been  accomplished 
without  special  legislation,  or  extraordinary  bovmties  to  promote 
that  increase.  It  has  been  found,  however,  that  the  operation  of 
the  draft,  with  the  high  bounties  paid  for  army  recruits,  is  be- 
ginning to  affect  injuriously  the  naval  service,  and  will,  if  not  cor- 
rected, be  likely  to  impair  its  efficiency,  by  detaching  seamen  from 
their  proper  vocation  and  inducing  them  to  enter  the  Army.-0  I 

25  Several  resolutions  on  the  subject  of  navy  yards  failed  of  adoption,  but  a 
joint  resolution  approved  on  June  30,  1864,  authorized  the  secretary  of  the  rinvy 
to  appoint  a  commission  to  select  a  site  for  a  navy  yard  on  the  Mississippi  and 
to  report  to  congress. 

20  The  next  sentence  replaced  a  long  passage  in  the  preliminary  draft  which 
read  as  follows:  It  is  of  paramount  importance  that  the  naval  service  which 
must  always  give  strength  and  renown  to  the  Union,  should  bo  cherished  and 
sustained.  I  therefore  think  it  proper  to  authorise  mariners  or  professional  sea- 
men who  may  enlist  under  the  late  call  for  300,000  volunteers  to  ontor  th<» 
naval  or  army  service  at  their  election;  and  in  view  of  the  exactions  which 
may  be  made  upon  the  maratime  communities,  if  compelled  to  furnish  the  full 

[44] 


DECEMBER      8,       ±863 

therefore  respectfully  suggest  that  Congress  might  aid  both  the 
army  and  naval  services  by  a  definite  provision  on  this  subject, 
which  would  at  the  same  time  be  equitable  to  the  communities 
more  especially  interested.27 

I  commend  to  your  consideration  the  suggestions  of  the  Secretary 
of  the  Navy  in  regard  to  the  policy  of  fostering  and  training  sea- 
men,28 and  also  the  education  of  officers  and  engineers  for  the 
naval  service.  The  Naval  Academy  is  rendering  signal  service  in 
preparing  midshipmen  for  the  highly  responsible  duties  which  in 
after  life  they  will  be  required  to  perform.  In  order  that  the 
country  should  not  be  deprived  of  the  proper  quota  of  educated 
officers,  for  which  legal  provision  has  been  made  at  the  naval 
school,  the  vacancies  caused  by  the  neglect  or  omission  to  make 
nominations  from  the  States  in  insurrection  have  been  filled  by  the 
Secretary  of  the  Navy. 

The  school  is  now  more  full  and  complete  than  at  any  former 
period,  and  in  every  respect  entitled  to  the  favorable  consideration 
of  Congress.29 

During  the  past  fiscal  year  the  financial  condition  of  the  Post 

complement  of  army  recruits  in  addition  to  those  of  their  citizens  who  may 
enter  the  navy,  I  [respectfully (?)]  suggest  that  the  townships  and  states  should 
each  be  credited  on  their  respective  quotas  with  the  number  who  may  hereafter 
enter  the  navy.  If  in  the  judgment  of  congress  any  further  legislation  be  needed 
to  authorise  this  policy  and  give  it  effect,  then  I  recommend  such  legislative 
action." 

27  Section  9  of  the  act  to  amend  the  enrollment  act  of  March  3,   1863,  ap- 
proved on  February  24,   1864,  provided  that  navy  and  marine  enlistments  be 
credited  to  the  locality  of  enrollment  as  part  of  the  draft  quota. 

28  See  House  of  Representatives  Executive  Document  No.  i,  IV,  xviii-xx.  Sec- 
retary Welles  suggested   that  steam  engineering  be   a   part   of   every   officer's 
training  and  that  a  special  class  be  set  up  at  Annapolis  to  provide  two  years' 
training  for  a  class  of  officers  to  be  third  assistant  engineers. 

29  An  additional  paragraph  appears  in  the  preliminary  draft  as  follows:  "The 
depredations  committed  upon  American  commerce  by  a  class  of  semi  piratical 
vessels,  built,  armed  and  manned  abroad,  and  with  no  recognised  nationality, 
have  naturally  excited  our  countrymen,  and  sometimes  even  seemed  likely  to 
endanger  our  friendly  relations  with  other  countries.  From  the  protection  and 
assistance  extended  to  them  by  governments  which  recognised  the  insurgents  as 
belligerents  and  equals,  and  entitled  to  all  the  privilieges  of  the  public  national 
vessels  of  the  United  States,  these  predatory  rovers  have  as  yet  escaped  our 
cruisers,  and  are  capturing  and  destroying  our  merchant  vessels  upon  the  high 
seas  without  sending  them  in  to  any  port  for  adjudication.  The  general  policy 
of  nations  in  the  interest  of  peace  and  the  moral  sentiment  of  mankind  are 
averse  to  such  lawless  proceedings.   Governments  seem  disposed  to  discounte- 
nance the  conduct  of  those  who,  without  a  country  or  port  to  which  they  can 
resort,  are  depredating  on  the  peaceful  commerce  of  a  country  with  which  those 
governments  are  in  amity.  The  action  recently  taken  by  them  indicates  a  deter- 
mination to  permit  no  armed  vessel  with  hostile  preparation  and  purpose  against 
our  commerce  and  people  to  go  forth  from  their  shores.  These  manifestations 
have,  I  trust,  tranquilized  whatever  excitement  may  have  at  any  time  existed.'* 

[45] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 

office  Department  has  been  one  of  increasing  prosperity,  and  I  am 
gratified  in  being  able  to  state  that  the  actual  postal  revenue  has 
nearly  equalled  the  entire  expenditures;  the  latter  amounting  to 
$11,314,206.84,  and  the  former  to  $11,163,789  59,  leaving  a  de- 
ficiency of  but  $150,417  25.  In  1860,  the  year  immediately  preced- 
ing the  rebellion  the  deficiency  amounted  to  $5,656,705  49,  tho 
postal  receipts  of  that  year  being  $2,645,722  19  less  than  those  of 
1863.  The  decrease  since  i8bo  in  the  annual  amount  of  transporta- 
tion has  been  only  about  25  per  cent,  but  the  annual  expenditure 
on  account  of  the  same  has  been  reduced  35  per  cent.  It  is  manifest, 
therefore,  that  the  Post  Office  Department  may  become  self-sustain- 
ing in  a  few  years,  even  with  the  restoration  of  the  whole  service. 

The  international  conference  of  postal  delegates  from  the  prin- 
cipal countries  of  Europe  and  America,  which  was  called  at  the 
suggestion  of  the  Postmaster  General,  met  at  Paris  on  the  i  ith  of 
May  last,  and  concluded  its  deliberations  on  the  8th  of  June.  The 
principles  established  by  the  conference  as  best  adapted  to  facili- 
tate postal  intercourse  between  nations,  and  as  the  basis  of  future 
postal  conventions,  inaugurate  a  general  system  of  uniform  inter- 
national charges,  at  reduced  rates  of  postage,  and  cannot  fail  to 
produce  beneficial  results.80 

I  refer  you  to  the  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  which  is 
herewith  laid  before  you,  for  useful  and  varied  information  in  re- 
lation to  the  public  lands,  Indian  affairs,  patents,  pensions,  and 
other  matters  of  public  concern  pertaining  to  his  department/11 

The  quantity  of  land  disposed  of  during  the  last  and  the  first 
quarter  of  the  present  fiscal  years  was  three  million  eight  hundred 
and  forty  one  thousand  five  hundred  and  forty  nine  acres,  of  which 
one  hundred  and  sixty  one  thousand  nine  hundred  and  eleven 
acres  were  sold  for  cash,  one  million  four  hundred  and  fifty  six 
thousand  five  hundred  and  fourteen  acres  were  taken  up  under  the 
homestead  law,  and  the  residue  disposed  of  under  laws  granting 
lands  for  military  bounties,  for  railroad  and  other  purposes.  It  also 
appears  that  the  sale  of  the  public  lands  is  largely  on  the  in- 
crease. 

It  has  long  been  a  cherished  opinion  of  some  of  our  wisest  states- 
men that  the  people  of  the  United  States  had  a  higher  and  more 
enduring  interest  in  the  early  settlement  and  substantial  cultiva- 
tion of  the  public  lands  than  in  the  amount  of  direct  revenue  to  be 
derived  from  the  sale  of  them.  This  opinion  has  had  a  controlling 
influence  in  shaping  legislation  upon  the  subject  of  our  national 

80  See  House  of  Representatives  Executive  Document  No    t    V 
81 III.  '     * 

[46] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 

domain.  I  may  cite,  as  evidence  of  this,  the  liberal  measures 
adopted  in  reference  to  actual  settlers;  the  grant  to  the  States  of 
the  overflowed  lands  within  their  limits  in  order  to  their  being  re- 
claimed and  rendered  fit  for  cultivation;  the  grants  to  railway 
companies  of  alternate  sections  of  land  upon  the  contemplated  lines 
of  their  roads  which,  when  completed,  will  so  largely  multiply  the 
facilities  for  reaching  our  distant  possessions.  This  policy  has  re- 
ceived its  most  signal  and  beneficent  illustration  in  the  recent 
enactment  granting  homesteads  to  actual  settlers. 

Since  the  first  day  of  January  last  the  before-mentioned  quan- 
tity of  one  million  four  hundred  and  fifty-six  thousand  five  hun- 
dred and  fourteen  acres  of  land  have  been  taken  up  under  its  pro- 
visions. This  fact  and  the  amount  of  sales  furnish  gratifying 
evidence  of  increasing  settlement  upon  the  public  lands,  notwith- 
standing the  great  struggle  in  which  the  energies  of  the  nation  have 
been  engaged,  and  which  has  required  so  large  a  withdrawal  of 
our  citizens  from  their  accustomed  pursuits.  I  cordially  concur  in 
the  recommendation  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  suggesting  a 
modification  of  the  act  in  favor  of  those  engaged  in  the  military 
and  naval  service  of  the  United  States.  I  doubt  not  that  Congress 
will  cheerfully  adopt  such  measures  as  will,  without  essentially 
changing  the  general  features  of  the  system,  secure  to  the  greatest 
practicable  extent,  its  benefits  to  those  who  have  left  their  homes  in 
the  defence  of  the  country  in  this  arduous  crisis.32 

I  invite  your  attention  to  the  views  of  the  Secretary  as  to  the 
propriety  of  raising  by  appropriate  legislation  a  revenue  from  the 
mineral  lands  of  the  United  States.33 

The  measures  provided  at  your  last  session  for  the  removal  of 
certain  Indian  tribes  have  been  carried  into  effect.  Sundry  treaties 
have  been  negotiated  which  will,  in  due  time,  be  submitted  for  the 
constitutional  action  of  the  Senate.  They  contain  stipulations  for 
extinguishing  the  possessory  rights  of  the  Indians  to  large  and 
valuable  tracts  of  land.  It  is  hoped  that  the  effect  of  these  treaties 
will  result  in  the  establishment  of  permanent  friendly  relations 

32  Section    i    of  "An   act  amendatory  of  the  Homestead  Law"   approved  on 
March  21,  1864,  provided  that  men  in  the  armed  services  could  make  affidavit 
before  a  commissioned  officer  of  the  service,  that  wives  or  other  relatives  resid- 
ing on  land  to  be  entered  might  file  the  affidavit  with  the  register,  and  extended 
the  time  for  filing  in  cases  where  men  were  called  from  actual  settlement  to 
enter  the  service. 

33  See  House  of  Representatives  Executive  Document  No.  *9  III,  iv,  for  the 
suggestion   of   a   small   tax   on   net   profits    of   gold    and   silver   mines.    An    act 
amendatory  to  the  internal  revenue  act  of  June  30,   1864,  approved  on  March 
3,   1865,  provided  for  a  license  fee  of  ten  dollars  on  all  who  employed  others 
in  mining,  but  no  profits  tax  seems  to  have  been  levied. 

[47] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 

with  such  of  these  tribes  as  have  been  brought  into  frequent  and 
bloody  collision  with  our  outlying  settlements  and  emigrants. 

Sound  policy  and  our  imperative  duty  to  these  wards  of  tho 
government  demand  our  anxious  and  constant  attention  to  their 
material  well-being,  to  their  progress  in  the  arts  of  civilisation, 
and,  above  all,  to  that  moral  training  which,  under  the  blessing 
of  Divine  Providence,  will  confer  upon  them  the  elevated  and 
sanctifying  influences,  the  hopes  and  consolation  of  the  Christum 
faith. 

I  suggested  in  my  last  annual  message  the  propriety  of  remodel- 
ling our  Indian  system.  Subsequent  events  have  satisfied  me  of  its 
necessity.  The  details  set  forth  in  the  report  of  the  Secretary  evince 
the  urgent  need  for  immediate  legislative  action.34 

I  commend  the  benevolent  institutions,  established  or  patronised 
by  the  government  in  this  District,  to  your  generous  and  fostering 
care. 

The  attention  of  Congress,  during  the  last  session,  was  ongnged 
to  some  extent  with  a  proposition  for  enlarging  the  water  commu- 
nication between  the  Mississippi  river  and  the  northeastern  sea- 
board, which  proposition,  however,  failed  for  the  time.  Since  ilum, 
upon  a  call  of  the  greatest  respectability  a  convention  has  been  held 
at  Chicago  upon  the  same  subject,  a  summary  of  whoso  views  is 
contained  in  a  memorial  addressed  to  the  President  and  Congress, 
and  which  I  now  have  the  honor  to  lay  before  you.  That  this  in- 
terest is  one  which,  ere  long,  will  force  its  own  way,  T  do  not  en- 
tertain a  doubt,  while  it  is  submitted  entirely  to  your  wisdom  as  to 
what  can  be  done  now.35  Augmented  interest  is  given  to  this  subject 
by  the  actual  commencement  of  work  upon  the  Pacific  railroad. 
under  auspices  so  favorable  to  rapid  progress  and  completion.  The 
enlarged  navigation  becomes  a  palpable  need  to  the  great  road. 

I  transmit  the  second  annual  report  of  the  Coinmissimier  of  I  he 
Department  of  Agriciilture,  asking  your  attention  to  the  develop- 
ments in  that  vital  interest  of  the  nation. 

When86  Congress  assembled  a  year  ago  the  war  had   already 

84  Bills  introduced  by  Alexander  Ramsey  in  the  Senate  (April  29,   ififi.f.)   ami 
by  William  Windom  in  the  House  (January  29,  1864.)   foiled  to  become  law. 

85  No  action  was  taken.  A  resolution  introduced  in   tho  House  by   Isaac    N. 
Arnold  on  December  16,  1863,  calling  for  the  printing  of  10.000  cop  IPS  of  tlu- 
Memorial  from  the  National  Canal  Convention,  was  defeated  on  I')t»rombi*r   -2. 

86  The  preliminary  draft  is  in  Lincoln's  autograph   from   this   point   on.    Al- 
though the  draft  is  incomplete,  we  infer  that  the  remainder  of  the  message  was 
Lincoln  s  composition,  while  the  preceding  portions  wore   originally   pn>pan-<l 
by  the  various  members  of  the  cabinet,  with  the  exception  of  tho  np^niu--  par-*- 
graph,  which  does  not  appear  in  the  draft,  and  which  was  probnblv  composed 
by  Lincoln.  '  *    ' 

[48] 


DECEMBER      8,       1863 

lasted  nearly  twenty  months,  and  there  had  been  many  conflicts 
on  both  land  and  sea,  with  varying  results. 

The  rebellion  had  been  pressed  back  into  reduced  limits;  yet  the 
tone  of  public  feeling  and  opinion,  at  home  and  abroad,  was  not 
satisfactory.  With  other  signs,  the  popular  elections,  then  just  past, 
indicated  uneasiness  among  ourselves,  while  amid  much  that  was 
cold  and  menacing  the  kindest  words  coming  from  Europe  were 
uttered  in  accents  of  pity,  that  we  were  too  blind  to  surrender  a 
hopeless  cause.  Our  commerce  was  suffering  greatly  by  a  few  armed 
vessels  built  upon  and  furnished  from  foreign  shores,  and  we  were 
threatened  with  such  additions  from  the  same  quarter  as  would 
sweep  our  trade  from  the  sea  and  raise  our  blockade.  We  had  failed 
to  elicit  from  European  governments  anything  hopeful  upon  this 
subject.  The  preliminary  emancipation  proclamation,  issued  in 
September,  was  running  its  assigned  period  to  the  beginning  of  the 
new  year.  A  month  later  the  final  proclamation  came,  including 
the  announcement  that  colored  men  of  suitable  condition  would  be 
received  into  the  war  service.  The  policy  of  emancipation,  and  of 
employing  black  soldiers,  gave  to  the  future  a  new  aspect,  about 
which  hope,  and  fear,  and  doubt  contended  in  uncertain  conflict. 
According  to  our  political  system,  as  a  matter  of  civil  administra- 
tion, the  general  government  had  no  lawful  power  to  effect  eman- 
cipation in  any  State,  and  for  a  long  time  it  had  been  hoped  that 
the  rebellion  could  be  suppressed  without  resorting  to  it  as  a  mili- 
tary measure.  It  was  all  the  while  deemed  possible  that  the  neces- 
sily  for  it  might  come,  and  that  if  it  should,  the  crisis  of  the  contest 
would  then  be  presented.  It  came,  and  as  was  anticipated,  it  was 
followed  by  dark  and  doubtful  days.  Eleven  months  having  now 
passed,  we  are  permitted  to  take  another  review.  The  rebel  borders 
are  pressed  still  further  back,  and  by  the  complete  opening  of  the 
Mississippi  the  country  dominated  by  the  rebellion  is  divided  into 
distinct  parts,  with  no  practical  communication  between  them. 
Tennessee  and  Arkansas  have  been  substantially  cleared  of  insur- 
gent control,  and  influential  citizens  in  each,  owners  of  slaves  and 
advocates  of  slavery  at  the  beginning  of  the  rebellion,  now  declare 
openly  for  emancipation  in  their  respective  States.  Of  those  States 
not  included  in  the  emancipation  proclamation,  Maryland,  and 
Missouri,  neither  of  which  three  years  ago  would  tolerate  any 
restraint  upon  the  extension  of  slavery  into  new  territories,  only 
dispute  now  as  to  the  best  mode  of  removing  it  within  their  own 
limits. 

Of  those  who  were  slaves  at  the  beginning  of  the  rebellion,  full 
one  hundred  thousand  are  now  in  the  United  States  military  serv- 

[49] 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

ice,  about  one-half  of  which  number  actually  bear  arms  in  the 
rants;  thus  giving  the  double  advantage  of  taking  so  much  labor 
from  the  insurgent  cause,  and  supplying  the  places  which  other- 
wise must  be  filled  with  so  many  white  men.  So  far  as  tested,  it  is 
difficult  to  say  they  are  not  as  good  soldiers  as  any.  No  servile  in- 
surrection, or  tendency  to  violence  or  cruelty,  has  marked  the 
measures  of  emancipation  and  arming  the  blacks.  These  measures 
have  been  much  discussed  in  foreign  countries,  and  contemporary 
with  such  discussion  the  tone  of  public  sentiment  there  is  much  im- 
proved.37 At  home  the  same  measures  have  been  fully  discussed, 
supported,  criticised,  and  denounced,  and  the  annual  elections  fol- 
lowing are  highly  encouraging  to  those  whose  official  duty  it  is  to 
bear  the  country  through  this  great  trial.  Thus  we  have  the  new 
reckoning.  The  crisis  which  threatened  to  divide  the  friends  of  the 
Union  is  past. 

Looking  now  to  the  present  and  future,  and  with  reference  to  a 
resumption  of  the  national  authority  within  the  States  wherein 
that  authority  has  been  suspended,  I  have  thought  fit  to  issue  a 
proclamation,  a  copy  of  which  is  herewith  transmitted.38  On  ex- 
amination of  this  proclamation  it  will  appear,  as  is  believed,  that 
nothing  is  attempted  beyond  what  is  amply  justified  by  the  Con- 
stitution. True,  the  form  of  an  oath  is  given,  but  no  man  is  coerced 
to  take  it.  The  man  is  only  promised  a  pardon  in  case  he  volun- 
tarily takes  the  oath.  The  Constitution  authorizes  the  Executive  to 
grant  or  withhold  the  pardon  at  his  own  absolute  discretion;  arid 
this  includes  the  power  to  grant  on  terms,  as  is  fully  established  by 
judicial  and  other  authorities. 

It  is  also  proffered  that  if,  in  any  of  the  States  named,  a  State 
government  shall  be,  in  the  mode  prescribed,  set  up,  such  govern- 
ment shall  be  recognized  and  guarantied  by  the  United  States,  and 
that  under  it  the  State  shall,  on  the  constitutional  conditions,  be 
protected  against  invasion  and  domestic  violence.  The  constitu- 
tional obligation  of  the  United  States  to  guaranty  to  every  State  in 
the  Union  a  republican  form  of  government,  and  to  protect  the 
State,  in  the  cases  stated,  is  explicit  and  full.  But  why  tender  the 
benefits  of  this  provision  only  to  a  State  government  set  up  in  this 
particular  way?  This  section  of  the  Constitution  contemplates  a 
case  wherein  the  element  within  a  State,  favorable  to  republican 

37  The  preliminary  draft  includes  at  this  point  the  following  sentence-  "The 
governments  of  England  and  France  have  prevented  war  vessels,  built  on  their 
shores  to  be  used  against  us,  from  sailing  thence." 

88  See  Lincoln's  proclamation  of  December  8,  infra. 

[50] 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

government,  in  the  Union,  may  be  too  feeble  for  an  opposite  and 
hostile  element  external  to,  or  even  within  the  State;  and  such  are 
precisely  the  cases  with  which  we  are  now  dealing. 

An  attempt  to  guaranty  and  protect  a  revived  State  government, 
constructed  in  whole,  or  in  preponderating  part,  from  the  very 
element  against  whose  hostility  and  violence  it  is  to  be  protected,  is 
simply  absurd.  There  must  be  a  test  by  which  to  separate  the  op- 
posing elements,  so  as  to  build  only  from  the  sound;  and  that  test 
is  a  sufficiently  liberal  one,  which  accepts  as  sound  whoever  will 
make  a  sworn  recantation  of  his  former  unsoundness. 

But  if  it  be  proper  to  require,  as  a  test  of  admission  to  the  po- 
litical body,  an  oath  of  allegiance  to  the  Constitution  of  the  United 
States,  and  to  the  Union  under  it,  why  also  to  the  laws  and  procla- 
mations in  regard  to  slavery?  Those  laws  and  proclamations  were 
enacted  and  put  forth  for  the  purpose  of  aiding  in  the  suppression 
of  the  rebellion.  To  give  them  their  fullest  effect,  there  had  to  be  a 
pledge  for  their  maintenance.  In  my  judgment  they  have  aided, 
and  will  further  aid,  the  cause  for  which  they  were  intended.  To 
now  abandon  them  would  be  not  only  to  relinquish  a  lever  of 
power,  but  would  also  be  a  cruel  and  an  astounding  breach  of  faith. 
I30  may  add  at  this  point,  that  while  I  remain  in  my  present  posi- 
tion I  shall  not  attempt  to  retract  or  modify  the  emancipation 
proclamation;  nor  shall  I  return  to  slavery  any  person  who  is  free 
by  the  terms  of  that  proclamation,  or  by  any  of  the  acts  of  Congress. 
For  these  and  other  reasons  it  is  thought  best  that  support  of  these 
measures  shall  be  included  in  the  oath;  and  it  is  believed  the  Ex- 
ecutive may  lawfully  claim  it  in  return  for  pardon  and  restoration 
of  forfeited  rights,  which  he  has  clear  constitutional  power  to  with- 
hold altogether,  or  grant  upon  the  terms  which  he  shall  deem 
wisest  for  the  public  interest.  It  should  be  observed,  also,  that  this 
part  of  the  oath  is  subject  to  the  modifying  and  abrogating  power 
of  legislation  and  supreme  judicial  decision. 

The  proposed  acquiescence  of  the  national  Executive  in  any 
reasonable  temporary  State  arrangement  for  the  freed  people  is 
made  with  the  view  of  possibly  modifying  the  confusion  and  desti- 
tution which  rmist,  at  best,  attend  all  classes  by  a  total  revolution  of 
labor  throughout  whole  States.  It  is  hoped  that  the  already  deeply 
afflicted  people  in  those  States  may  be  somewhat  more  ready  to 
give  up  the  cause  of  their  affliction,  if,  to  this  extent,  this  vital 
matter  be  left  to  themselves;  while  no  power  of  the  national  Exe- 
cutive to  prevent  an  abuse  is  abridged  by  the  proposition. 
39  This  sentence  is  not  in  the  preliminary  draft. 

[51] 

4.4 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

The40  suggestion  in  the  proclamation  as  to  maintaining  the  po- 
litical framework  of  the  States  on  what  is  called  reconstruction,  is 
made  in  the  hope  that  it  may  do  good  without  danger  of  harm.  It 
will  save  labor  and  avoid  great  confusion. 

But  why  any  proclamation  now  upon  this  subject?  This  question 
is  beset  with  the  conflicting  views  that  the  step  might  be  delayed 
too  long  or  be  taken  too  soon.  In  some  States  the  elements  for  re- 
sumption seem  ready  for  action,  but  remain  inactive,  apparently 
for  want  of  a  rallying  point— a  plan  of  action.  Why  shall  A  adopt 
the  plan  of  B,  rather  than  B  that  of  A?  And  if  A  and  B  should 
agree,  how  can  they  know  but  that  the  general  government  here 
will  reject  their  plan?  By  the  proclamation  a  plan  is  presented 
which  may  be  accepted  by  them  as  a  rallying  point,  and  which  they 
are  assured  in  advance  will  not  be  rejected  here.  This  may  bring 
them  to  act  sooner  than  they  otherwise  would. 

The  objections  to  a  premature  presentation  of  a  plan  by  the  na- 
tional Executive  consists  in  the  danger  of  committals  on  points 
which  could  be  more  safely  left  to  further  developments.  Care  has 
been  taken  to  so  shape  the  document  as  to  avoid  embarrassments 
from  this  source.  Saying  that,  on  certain  terms,  certain  classes  will 
be  pardoned,  with  rights  restored,  it  is  not  said  that  other  classes, 
or  other  terms,  will  never  be  included.  Saying  that  reconstruction 
will  be  accepted  if  presented  in  a  specified  way,  it  is  not  said  it- 
will  never  be  accepted  in  any  other  way.41 

The  movements,  by  State  action,  for  emancipation  in  several 
of  the  States,  not  included  in  the  emancipation  proclamation,  are 
matters  of  profound  gratulation.  And  while  I  do  not  repent  in  de- 
tail what  I  have  hertofore  so  earnestly  urged  upon  this  subject,  my 
general  views  and  feelings  remain  xmchanged;  and  I  trust  that 
Congress  will  omit  no  fair  opportunity  of  aiding  these  important 
steps  to  a  great  consummation. 

In  the  midst  of  other  cares,  however  important,  we  must  not 
lose  sight  of  the  fact  that  the  war  power  is  still  our  main  reliance. 
To  that  power  alone  can  we  look,  yet  for  a  time,  to  give  confidence 

40  This  paragraph  was  revised  by  Lincoln  from  a  longer  paragraph    in    the 
preliminary  draft  as  follows:  "The  suggestion  in  the  proclamation,  ns  to  main- 
taining the   general  old  frame-work   of   the   States,   on   what   is   called    re-rori- 
struction,  is  made  in  the  hope  that  it  may  do  good,  without   danger  of   harm. 
The  question  whether  these  States  have  continued  to  be  States  in  the  Union,  or 
have  become  territories,  out  of  it,  seems  to  me,  in  every  present  aspect,  to  be  of 
no  practical  importance.  They  all  have  been  States  in  the  Union;   and   all   am 
to  be  hereafter,  as  we  all  propose;  and  a  controversy  whether  they  have  ever- 
been  out  of  it,  might  divide  and  weaken,  but  could  not  enhance  our  .strength,  in 
restoring  the  proper  national  and  State  relations." 

41  The  preliminary  draft  does  not  go  beyond  this  point. 

[52] 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

to  the  people  in  the  contested  regions,  that  the  insurgent  power 
will  not  again  overrun  them.  Until  that  confidence  shall  be  es- 
tablished, little  can  be  done  anywhere  for  what  is  called  recon- 
struction. Hence  our  chiefest  care  must  still  be  directed  to  the 
army  and  navy,  who  have  thus  far  borne  their  harder  part  so  nobly 
and  well.  And  it  may  be  esteemed  fortunate  that  in  giving  the 
greatest  efficiency  to  these  indispensable  arms,  we  do  also  honorably 
recognize  the  gallant  men,  from  commander  to  sentinel,  who  com- 
pose them,  and  to  whom,  more  than  to  others,  the  world  must 
stand  indebted  for  the  home  of  freedom  disenthralled,  regenerated, 
enlarged,  and  perpetuated.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  December  8,  1863. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

Major  General  Grant  Executive  Mansion, 

Chattanooga,  Tenn.  Washington,  Dec.  8.  1863. 

Understanding  that  your  lodgment  at  Chattanooga  and  Knox- 
ville  is  now  secure,  I  wish  to  tender  you,  and  all  under  your  com- 
mand, my  more  than  thanks — my  profoundest  gratitude — for  the 
skill,  courage,  and  perseverance,  with  which  you  and  they,  over 
so  great  difficulties,  have  effected  that  important  object.  God  bless 
you  all.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Grant  incorporated  this  dispatch  in  his  General  Orders  No.  7, 
Military  Division  of  the  Mississippi,  December  8,  1863. 

Proclamation   of  Amnesty  and  Reconstruction1 

December  8,  1863 
By  the  President  of  the  United  States  of  America: 

A  Proclamation. 

Whereas,  in  and  by  the  Constitution  of  the  United  States,  it  is 
provided  that  the  President  "shall  have  power  to  grant  reprieves 
and  pardons  for  offences  against  the  United  States,  except  in  cases 
of  impeachment;"  and 

Whereas  a  rebellion  now  exists  whereby  the  loyal  State  govern- 
ments of  several  States  have  for  a  long  time  been  subverted,  and 

i  DS,  DNA  FS  RG  11,  Proclamations;  ADS,  OCHP;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  Unlike 
most  of  Lincoln's  proclamations,  this  one  is  preserved  in  an  autograph  draft 
and  an  autograph  copy,  as  well  as  in  the  official  signed  copy  filed  in  the 
Archives.  The  autograph  copy  was  obtained  by  Senator  John  Sherman  to  be 
sold  at  auction  by  the  Great  Western  Sanitary  Fair  which  was  held  in  Cincin- 
nati, Ohio,  beginning  on  December  21,  1863. 

[53] 


DECEMBER      8,      1863 

many  persons  have  committed  and  are  now  guilty  of  treason 
against  the  United  States;  and 

Whereas,  with  reference  to  said  rebellion  and  treason,  laws  have 
been  enacted  by  Congress  declaring  forfeitures  and  confiscation 
of  property  and  liberation  of  slaves,  all  upon  terms  and  conditions 
therein  stated,  and  also  declaring  that  the  President  was  thereby 
authorized  at  any  time  thereafter,  by  proclamation,  to  extend  to 
persons  who  may  have  participated  in  the  existing  rebellion,  in  any 
State  or  part  thereof,  pardon  and  amnesty,  with  such  exceptions 
and  at  such  times  and  on  such  conditions  as  he  may  deem  expedi- 
ent for  the  public  welfare;  and 

Whereas  the  congressional  declaration  for  limited  and  condi- 
tional pardon  accords  with  well-established  judicial  exposition  of 
the  pardoning  power;  and 

Whereas,  with  reference  to  said  rebellion,  the  President  of  the 
United  States  has  issued  several  proclamations,  with  provisions  in 
regard  to  the  liberation  of  slaves;  and 

Whereas  it  is  now  desired  by  some  persons  heretofore  engaged 
in  said  rebellion  to  resume  their  allegiance  to  the  United  Slates, 
and  to  reinaugurate  loyal  State  governments  within,  and  for  their 
respective  States;  therefore, 

I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President  of  the  United  States,  do  proclaim, 
declare,  and  make  known  to  all  persons  who  have,  directly  or  by 
implication,  participated  in  the  existing  rebellion,  except  as  here- 
inafter excepted,  that  a  full  pardon  is  hereby  granted  to  them  and 
each  of  them,  with  restoration  of  all  rights  of  property,  except  as 
to  slaves,  and  in  property  cases  where  rights  of  third  parties  shall 
have  intervened,  and  upon  the  condition  that  every  such  person 
shall  take  and  subscribe  an  oath,  and  thenceforward  keep  and 
maintain  said  oath  inviolate;  and  which  oath  shall  be  registered 
for  permanent  preservation,  and  shall  be  of  the  tenor  and  effort 
following,  to  wit: 

'%  ^  do  solemnly  swear,  in  presence  of  Almighty  God. 

that  I  will  henceforth  faithfully  support,  protect  and  defend  the 
Constitution  of  the  United  States,  and  the  union  of  the  States  there- 
under; and  that  I  will,  in  like  manner,  abide  by  and  faithfully  sup- 
port all  acts  of  Congress  passed  during  the  existing  rebellion  with 
reference  to  slaves,  so  long  and  so  far  as  not  repealed,  modified  or 
held  void  by  Congress,  or  by  decision  of  the  Supreme  Court;  and 
that  I  will,  in  like  manner,  abide  by  and  faithfully  support  all 
proclamations  of  the  President  made  during  the  existing  rebellion 
having  reference  to  slaves,  so  long  and  so  far  as  not  modified  or 
declared  void  by  decision  of  the  Supreme  Court.  So  help  me  God." 

[54] 


DECEMBER      8,      ±863 

The2  persons  excepted  from  the  benefits  of  the  foregoing  pro- 
visions are  all  who  are,  or  shall  have  been,  civil  or  diplomatic  of- 
ficers or  agents  of  the  so-called  confederate  government;  all  who 
have  left  judicial  stations  under  the  United  States  to  aid  the  rebel- 
lion; all  who  are,  or  shall  have  been,  military  or  naval  officers  of 
said  so-called  confederate  government  above  the  rank  of  colonel  in 
the  army,  or  of  lieutenant  in  the  navy;  all  who  left  seats  in  the 
United  States  Congress  to  aid  the  rebellion;  all  who  resigned  com- 
missions in  the  army  or  navy  of  the  United  States,  and  afterwards 
aided  the  rebellion;  and  all  who  have  engaged  in  any  way  in  treat- 
ing colored  persons  or  white  persons,  in  charge  of  such,  otherwise 
than  lawfully  as  prisoners  of  war,  and  which  persons  may  have 
been  found  in  the  United  States  service,  as  soldiers,  seamen,  or  in 
any  other  capacity. 

And  I  do  further  proclaim,  declare,  and  make  known,  that  when- 
ever, in  any  of  the  States  of  Arkansas,  Texas,  Louisiana,  Missis- 
sippi, Tennessee,  Alabama,  Georgia,  Florida,  South  Carolina,  and 
North  Carolina,  a  number  of  persons,  not  less  than  one-tenth  in 
nximber  of  the  votes  cast  in  such  State  at  the  Presidential  election 
of  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  sixty,  each 
having  taken  the  oath  aforesaid  and  not  having  since  violated  it, 
and  being  a  qualified  voter  by  the  election  law  of  the  State  exist- 
ing immediately  before  the  so-called  act  of  secession,  and  exclud- 
ing all  others,  shall  re-establish  a  State  government  which  shall  be 
republican,  and  in  no  wise  contravening  said  oath,  such  §hall  be 
recognized  as  the  true  government  of  the  State,  and  the  State  shall 
receive  thereunder  the  benefits  of  the  constitutional  provision 
which  declares  that  "The  United  States  shall  guaranty  to  every 
State  in  this  union  a  republican  form  of  government,  and  shall 
protect  each  of  them  against  invasion;  and,  on  application  of  the 
legislature,  or  the  executive,  (when  the  legislature  cannot  be  con- 
vened,) against  domestic  violence." 

And  I  do  further  proclaim,  declare,  and  make  known  that  any 
provision  which  may  be  adopted  by  such  State  government  in  re- 
lation to  the  freed  people  of  such  State,  which  shall  recognize  and 
declare  their  permanent  freedom,  provide  for  their  education,  and 
which  may  yet  be  consistent,  as  a  temporary  arrangement,  with 
their  present  condition  as  a  laboring,  landless,  and  homeless  class, 
will  not  be  objected  to  by  the  national  Executive.  And8  it  is  sug- 

2  This  paragraph,  appearing  as  an  insertion  in  the  autograph  draft  and  auto- 
graph copy,  was  based  on  a  list  of  exceptions  furnished  by  the  War  Depart- 
ment and  revised  by  Lincoln   (DLC-RTL). 

3  The  remainder  of  this  paragraph  appears  as  an  autograph  insertion  in  the 
autograph  draft  and  the  autograph  copy. 

[55] 


DECEMBER     89      1863 

gested  as  not  improper,  that,  in  constructing  a  loyal  State  govern- 
ment in  any  State,  the  name  of  the  State,  the  boundary,   the 
subdivisions,  the  constitution,  and  the  general  code  of  laws.,  as  be- 
fore the  rebellion,  be  maintained,  subject  only  to  the  modifications 
made  necessary  by  the  conditions  hereinbefore  stated,  and  such 
others,  if  any,  not  contravening  said  conditions,  and  which  may 
be  deemed  expedient  by  those  framing  the  new  State  government. 
To  avoid  misunderstanding,  it  may  be  proper  to  say  that  this 
proclamation,  so  far  as  it  relates  to  State  governments,  has  no  ref- 
erence to  States  wherein  loyal  State  governments  have   all  the 
while  been  maintained.  And  for  the  same  reason,  it  may  be  proper 
to  further  say  that  whether  members  sent  to  Congress  from  any 
State  shall  be  admitted  to  seats,  constitutionally  rests  exclusively 
with  the  respective  Houses,  and  not  to  any  extent  with  the  Execu- 
tive. And  still  further,  that  this  proclamation  is  intended  to  present 
the  people  of  the  States  wherein  the  national  authority  has  been 
suspended,  and  loyal  State  governments  have  been  subverted,,   a 
mode  in  and  by  which  the  national  authority  and  loyal  State  gov- 
ernments may  be  re-established  within  said  States,  or  in  any  of 
them;  and,  while  the  mode  presented  is  the  best  the  Executive  can 
suggest,  with  his  present  impressions,  it  must  not  be  understood 
that  no  other  possible  mode  would  be  acceptable. 

Given  under  my  hand  at  the  city,  of  Washington,  the  8th.  day 

of  December,  A.D.  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  sixty- 

[L.S.]          three,  and  of  the  independence  of  the  United  States  of 

America  the  eighty-eighth.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

By  the  President: 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD,  Secretary  of  State. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  8.  1  8(1  5 

Congress,  on  my  recommendation,  passed  a  Resolution,  approved 
7th.  February  1863,  tendering  its  thanks  to  Commander  D  D 
Porter  "for  the  bravery  and  skill  displayed  in  the  attack  on  the 
Post  of  Arkansas  on  the  loth.  January  1863,"  and  in  consideration 
of  those  services,  together  with  his  efficient  labors  and  vigilance 
subsequently  displayed  in  thwarting  the  efforts  of  the  rebel,  to  ob- 
struct the  Mississippi  and  its  tributaries,  and  the  important  part 
rendered  by  the  Squadron  under  his  command,  which  led  to  the 
surrender  of  Vicksburg. 


.rov'  inoc°nformity  to  *e  7th.  Section,  of  the  Act:  ap- 
proved ifith.  July  1862,  nominate  Commander  D.  D.  Porter,  to  bo 

[56] 


DECEMBER      Q      ,1863 

a  Rear  Admiral  in  the  Navy,  on  the  Active  List,  from  the  4th.  July 
1863,  to  fill  an  existing  vacancy.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  D.C.       1 

8th.  December  1863.  J 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  386  A2.  David  D.  Porter's  appointment  was  con- 
firmed by  the  Senate  on  February  2,  1864. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

December  8,  1863 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives. 

In  conformity  to  the  Law  of  16  July,  1862,  I  most  cordially 
recommend  that  Captain  John  Rodgers,  U.S.  Navy,  receive  a  vote 
of  thanks  from  Congress  for  the  eminent  skill  and  gallantry  ex- 
hibited by  him  in  the  engagement  with  the  Rebel  armed  Iron  Clad 
Steamer  "Fingal,"  alias  "Atlanta,"  whilst  in  command  of  the  U.S. 
Iron  Clad  Steamer  "Weehawken,"  which  led  to  her  capture  on  the 
17  June,  1863,  and  also  for  the  zeal,  bravery  and  general  good 
conduct  shown  by  this  Officer  on  many  occasions. 

This  recommendation  is  specially  made  in  order  to  comply  with 
the  requirements  of  the  gth.  Section  of  the  aforesaid  Act,  which  is 
in  the  following  words,  viz:  — 

"That  any  line  officer  of  the  navy  or  marine  corps  may  be  ad- 
vanced one  grade,  if,  upon  recommendation  of  the  President  by 
name,  he  receives  the  thanks  of  Congress  for  highly  distinguished 
conduct  in  conflict  with  the  enemy,  or  for  extraordinary  heroism  in 
the  line  of  his  profession."  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  D.C., 

8  December,  1863. 

IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  F2;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive 
Document.  The  resolution  of  thanks  to  Captain  John  Rodgers  was  approved  on 
December  23,  1863,  and  Rodgers*  appointment  as  commodore  was  confirmed  by 
the  Senate  on  February  2,  1864. 

To  Andrew  G.  Curtin1 

His  Excellency  A.  G.  Curtin  Executive  Mansion, 

Governor  of  Pennsylvania  Washington,  Dec.  9,  1863. 

My  dear  Sir  I  have  to  urge  my  illness  and  the  preparation  of 
the  Message  in  excuse  for  not  having  sooner  transmitted  you  the 
inclosed  from  the  Secretary  of  War  and  Provost  Marshal-General 
in  response  to  yours  in  relation  to  recruiting  in  Pennsylvania. 
Though  not  quite  as  you  desire,  I  hope  the  grounds  taken  will  be 

[57] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

We  will  consider  this  a  few  days,  and  prepare  instructions.  In  the 
mean  time,  no  harm  will  be  done.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  10.  [n  ?]  1863. 

i  AES  NHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  back  of  the  following 
note  from  Stanton  dated  December  11,  1863:  "General  Augur  reports  that  ap- 
nlicationTfor  the  amnesty  are  already  pouring  in  upon  him!!  and  he  has  np- 
ffi^£teSte».»  Either  Stanton's  date  is  incorrect  or  Lincoln  nnsdatos 
his  endorsement.  General  Christopher  C.  Augur  was  in  command  of  the  DC- 
partment  of  Washington,  D.C. 

To  Salmon  R  Chase1 

December  11,  1863 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Treasury  please  see  the  bearer  Mr.  Morrison,  of  Illi- 
nois, who  is  personally  known  to  me  to  be  a  most  worthy  gentle- 
man. A.  LINCOLN 
Dec.  11,  1863 

1  ALS,  owned  by  R.  E.  Crane,  Ford  City,  Pennsylvania.  The  bearer  of  Lin- 
coln's note  was  perhaps  James  L.  D.  Morrison. 


To  Henry  H.  Lockwood1 

December  11,  1863 
[Brigadier-General  Lockwood,  Baltimore,  Md.:] 

The  sentences  in  the  cases  of  privates  William  Irons  co.  D,  & 
Jesse  Lewis,  co  E.  5th.  Maryland  vols  ordered  to  be  carried  into 
execution  to  day,  is  hereby  suspended  until  further  orders. 

Deer.  nth.  1863  A.  LINCOLN 


,  RPB.  Chief  of  Staff  Bonn  Piatt  replied  at  11:25  A.M.,  "Telegram  sus- 
pending execution  of  private  Wm  Irons  Co  D  &  Jesse  Lewis  Co  E  /jth  Md  re- 
ceived 11:15  am  today"  (DLC-RTL).  Both  soldiers  remained  in  service.  Irons 
being  mustered  out  on  June  14,  1865,  and  Lewis  on  December  3,  1864. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  December  n,  1863. 
Major-General  Meade,  Army  of  the  Potomac: 

Lieut.  Col.  James  B.  Knox,  Tenth  Regiment  Pennsylvania  Re- 
serves, offers  his  resignation  under  circumstances  inducing  mo  to 
wish  to  accept  it.  But  I  prefer  to  know  your  pleasure  upon  the  sub- 
ject. Please  answer.  A  LINCOLN. 

[60] 


DECEMBER      12,      1863 

i-Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  404,  No  reply  has  been  located.  The  roster  of  the 
Thirty-ninth  Pennsylvania  Volunteers  (Tenth  Reserve)  lists  Lieutenant  Colonel 
James  B,  Knox  as  resigned  on  November  23,  1863. 


To  John  M.  Schofield1 

"Cypher" 

Gen.  J.  M.  Schofield  Executive  Mansion, 

St.  Louis,  Mo.  Washington,  Dec.  11.  1863. 

Please  come  to  see  me  at  once.         A  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  General  Schofield's  telegram  in  reply,  "I  start  this  evening," 
was  sent  at  10:30  A.M.  on  December  12  but  was  not  received  at  Washington 
until  December  13.  (DLC-RTL).  See  Lincoln  to  Schofield,  December  13,  infra. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major- General  Meade:  December  12,  1863. 

Please  suspend  execution  of  sentence  in  case  of  William  F. 
Goodwin,  Company  B,  Seventeenth  Infantry,  and  forward  the  rec- 
ord for  my  examination.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  404.  Meade's  reply  was  received  at  4:20  P.M.:  "Your 
telegram  in  relation  to  private  Wm.  F.  Goodwin  Co  "B"  i/th.  Infy  has  been 
reed,  and  the  order  to  suspend  the  execution  of  the  sentence  till  your  orders 
are  received,  the  proceedings  will  be  forwarded."  (DLC-RTL).  No  further  refer- 
ence has  been  found. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

December  12,  1863 

Gen.  Palmer's  resignation  was  not  accepted  by  me.  You  remember 
I  promised  to  write  him  on  the  subject,  which  however  I  have  neg- 
lected to  do.  I  do  not  want  him  to  resign,  unless  there  be  some 
reason  not  yet  known  to  me.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Dec.  12.   1863 

1  AES,  DLC.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  note  from  Stanton  dated 
December  12:  "Will  you  please  to  inform  me  whether  General  Palmers  resig- 
nation was  accepted  by  your  direction." 

On  October  8,  1863,  believing  that  the  order  dissolving  the  Twenty-first 
Corps,  of  which  his  Second  Division  was  a  part,  was  a  censure,  General  John 
M.  Palmer  submitted  his  resignation.  Halleck  recommended  acceptance  of  the 
resignation  and  Stanton  endorsed  the  letter  of  resignation  "to  take  effect  De- 
cember ist."  On  October  28  Palmer  was  notified  of  his  assignment  to  command 
the  Fourteenth  Army  Corps,  and  after  a  short  leave  took  over  the  command 
(Personal  Recollections  of  John  M.  Palmer,  pp.  191  ff.). 


To  John  M.  Schofield1 


Gen.  J.  M.  Schofield  Executive  Mansion. 

St.  Louis,  Mo  Washington,  D.C.  Dec.  13.  1863. 

On  the  nth.  I  telegraphed,  asking  you  to  come  here  and  see  me. 

A-  LINCOIJN 


. 
Did  you  receive  the  despatch?  A- 

i  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Schofield,  December  11,  supra,  and  to  Stanton, 
December  18,  infra. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Executive  Mansion, 
My  Dear  Sir  Washington,  December  14,  1863.  ^ 

If  upon  examination  of  this  case  you  find  that  the  facts  are  in 
accordance  with  the  statement  of  the  petition  and  that  Dr.  Ratcliffe 
took  the  oath  of  allegiance  at  the  invitation  of  our  military  au- 
thorities &  has  since  kept  it  inviolate,  let  him  be  pardoned  for  any 
treasonable  practice  previous  to  such  recantation,  and  freed  from 
the  penalties  now  hanging  over  him.  Your  Obt.  Servt 

The  Hon     The  Attorney  Gen'l.  A.  LUSTCOLIST 

i  LS,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  495-  This  note  is  filed  with  the 
case  of  Charles  T.  Ratcliffe.  No  further  reference  has  been  found. 


Agreement  Signed  by  Samuel  L.  Casey1 

Washington  D.C.  Dec.  14.  1863. 

In  consideration  that  the  President  of  the  United  States  to-day 
delivers  to  me  a  paper  of  which  the  within  is  a  copy,  I  pledge  him 
my  word  of  honor  that  whatever  I  may  do  thereunder  shall  he  at: 
my  own  expence,  and  risk  of  person  and  property,  with  no  claim 
upon  him,  or  upon  the  government  in  any  contingency  whatever; 
that  I  will  take  absolutely  nothing  into  the  insurgent  lines,  which 
could  be  of  value  to  them,  except  the  boats,  tows,  and  provisions,  as 
stated;  and  that  I  will  not  take  said  boats,  tows,  and  provisions,  or 
any  of  them  into  said  insurgent  lines,  unless  I  shall  first  have  the 
personal  pledge  of  Gen.  Kirby  Smith,2  given  directly  by  him  to 
me,  that  said  boats  and  tows  shall,  without  condition,  safely  return 
to  our  military  lines.  S.  L.  Casey 

!  AD,  DLC-RTL.  The  agreement  is  in  Lincoln's  autograph  except  for  tho 
signature  and  insertion  noted. 

2  On  a  separate  page  appears  a  phrase,  not  in  Lincoln's  handwriting,  which 
was  intended  as  an  insertion  at  this  point:  "or  the  officer  in  chief  command." 

[62] 


Order  Concerning  Samuel  L.  Casey1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  December  14,  1863. 
All  Military  and  Naval  commanders  will  please  give  to  the  Hon. 
Samuel  L.  Casey,  of  Kentucky  (with  any  number  of  inferior  Stern- 
wheel-Steam-Boats  not  exceeding  three  taking  in  tow  any  number 
of  barges,  scows,  flats,  and  the  like,  not  having  Steam-power, 
which  they  may  be  able  to  so  take,  without  money,  and  without 
cargoes  outgoing,  and  only  with  crews  to  navigate  the  whole,  and 
necessary  provisions  for  himself  and  said  crews)  protection  and 
safe-conduct  from  Cairo  to  Red  River,  and  up  said  river,  and  it's 
tributaries,  till  he  shall  pass  beyond  our  Military  lines,  and  also 
give  him  such  protection  and  safe  conduct,  on  his  return  to  our 
lines,  back  to  Cairo  with  any  cargoes  he  may  bring;  and  on  his 
safe  return  from  beyond  our  lines,  with  said  boats  and  tows,  allow 
him  to  repeat  once  or  twice  if  he  shall  desire.  A. 


1  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  A  copy  of  this  order  preserved  in  the  Nathaniel  E  Banks 
Papers  (Essex  Institute,  Salem,  Massachusetts)  preserves  endorsements  by  Rear 
Admiral  David  D.  Porter  and  Major  General  Banks  ordering  all  officers  to 
respect  the  president's  wishes.  Casey  and  others  owned  a  large  amount  of  cot- 
ton which  they  wished  to  bring  North.  See  further  Lincoln's  order  of  Febru- 
ary 29,  1864,  infra. 


Amnesty  to  Emily  T.  Helm1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  December  14.  1863. 

Mrs.  Emily  T.  Helm,  not  being  excepted  from  the  benefits  of  the 
proclamation  by  the  President  of  the  United  States  issued  on  the 
8th.  day  of  December.  1863,  and  having  on  this  day  taken  and  sub- 
scribed the  oath  according  to  said  proclamation,  she  is  fully  re- 
lieved of  all  penalties  and  forfeitures,  and  remitted  to  all  her  rights, 
all  according  to  said  proclamation,  and  not  otherwise;  and,  in  re- 
gard to  said  restored  rights  of  person  and  property,  she  is  to  be 
protected  and  afforded  facilities  as  a  loyal  person. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

P.S.  Mrs.  Helm  claims  to  own  some  cotten  at  Jackson,  Mississippi, 
and  also  some  in  Georgia;  and  I  shall  be  glad,  upon  either  place  be- 
ing brought  within  our  lines,  for  her  to  be  afforded  the  proper 
facilities  to  show  her  ownership,  and  take  her  property. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ADS  copy,  DLC-RTL.  Although  the  widow  of  Ben  Hardin  Helm  signed  her 
name  "Emily"  other  sources  are  unanimous  in  giving  it  as  "Emilie."  See  also 
Lincoln's  communication  to  whom  it  may  concern,  infra.  Orville  H.  Browning's 
Diary  records  under  date  of  December  14:  "The  President  told  me  his  sister  in 

[63] 


DECEMBER      14,      ±863 

law,  Mrs  Helm  was  in  tibe  house,  but  he  did  not  wish  it  known.  She  wished 
an  order  for  the  protection  of  some  Cotton  she  had  at  Jackson,  Mississippi.  He 
thought  she  ought  to  have  it,  but  he  was  afraid  he  would  be  censured  if  lie  did 


so. 


When  Mrs.  Helm  arrived  at  the  White  House  is  not  certain.  Some  time  after 
October  (see  Lincoln  to  Todd,  October  31,  supra),  she  arrived  at  Fort  Monroe, 
where  upon  her  refusing  to  take  the  oath  of  allegiance,  an  officer  is  supposed 
to  have  telegraphed  Lincoln,  who  replied,  "Send  her  to  me."  (Katharine  Helm, 
Mary,  Wife  of  Lincoln,  p.  221).  No  trace  of  these  telegrams  has  been  dis- 
covered. 

Oath  of  Emily  T.  Helm1 

District  of  Columbia!  ^  __  . 

Washington  County  }SS  [December  14,  1863] 

I,  Emily  T.  Helm,  do  solemnly  swear  in  presence  of  Almighty 
God  that  I  will  henceforth  faithfully  support,  protect  and  defend 
the  Constitution  of  the  United  States,  and  the  union  of  the  States 
thereunder;  and  that  I  will,  in  like  manner,  abide  by,  and  faithful- 
ly support  all  acts  of  Congress  passed  during  the  existing  rebellion 
with  reference  to  slaves,  so  long  and  so  far  as  not  repealed,  modi- 
fied, or  held  void  by  Congress,  or  by  decision  of  the  Supreme  Court ; 
and  that  I  will,  in  like  manner,  abide  by,  and  faithfully  support  ^^ll 
proclamations  of  the  President,  made  during  the  existing  rebellion, 
having  reference  to  slaves  so  long  and  so  far  as  not  modified,  or 
declared  void  by  the  Supreme  Court.  So  help  me  God. 

IAD  copy,  DLC-RTL. 

To  Whom  It  May  Concern1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Whom  it  may  concern  Washington,  December  14.  1863. 

It  is  my  wish  that  Mrs.  Emily  T.  Helm,  (widow  of  the  late  Gen. 
B.  H.  Helm,  who  fell  in  the  Confederate  service)  now  returning 
to  Kentucky,  may  have  protection  of  person  and  property,  except 
as  to  slaves,  of  which  I  say  nothing.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ADS  copy,  DLC-RTL. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

--  .      ^  .  ^  Executive  Mansion, 

Major-General  Meade:  Washington,  December  14,   1863 

Please  suspend  execution  in  case  of  William  Gibson,  Fourth 
Maine  Regiment  until  further  order  and  send  record. 

_  A.  LINCOLN. 

iTarbell   (Appendix),  p.  405.  No  later  reference  has  been  discovered. 

[64] 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major- General  Meade:  Washington,  December  14,  1863. 

Please  suspend  execution  of  Lewis  Beers,  Fourteenth  U.S.  In- 
fantry, and  of  William  J.  Hazlett,  One  hundred  and  nineteenth 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers  and  send  record.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  405.  No  later  reference  has  been  discovered. 

Memorandum  and  Endorsement 
Concerning  James  B.  Rodgers1 

December  14,  1863 

It  is  sought  in  this  case  that,  Lieut.  Rodgers,  having  offered  his 
resignation,  because  of  physical  disability,  the  sentence  of  repri- 
mand, be  revoked. 

The  Recommendation  of  Gen.  Geary  is  approved.        A.  LINCOLN 
Dec.  14.  1863. 

1  AE  and  ES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  858.  Lin- 
coln's undated  memorandum  is  written  on  a  medical  certificate  that  Rodgers  is 
sick  and  unfit  for  duty.  The  endorsement,  in  Hay's  hand  but  signed  by  Lin- 
coln, is  written  at  bottom  of  the  record.  Lieutenant  James  B.  Rodgers  of  the 
One  Hundred  Ninth  Pennsylvania  Volunteers  was  cashiered  for  being  absent 
without  leave.  General  Geary  recommended  commutation  to  forfeiture  of  pay 
for  period  of  absence.  Rodgers  was  discharged  April  9,  1864. 

Recommendation  for  John  Alexander1 

I  believe  Mr.  Alexander  is  a  very  worthy  gentleman,  and  a  very 
competent  one  in  the  line  in  which  he  proposes  to  be  engaged 
Dec.  14.  1863.  A.  LINCOLN 

1 AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Mrs. 
Lincoln  to  Clerk  of  the  House  of  Representatives  Edward  McPherson,  recom- 
mending Alexander  as  "an  applicant  for  the  upholstering  under  you  and  from 
the  work  done  at  the  Executive  Mansion  by  him  I  can  certify  to  his  com- 
petency. .  .  ." 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

December  14,  1863 

Let  Henry  N.  Warfield,  named  within,  be  paroled  and  delivered 
to  the  custody, — bailed,  so  to  speak, — to  his  brother-in-law,  Dr.  L. 
W.  Brown,  who  and  whose  brothers  are  very  near  friends  of  mine 
in  Illinois.  A.  LINCOLN. 

December  14,  1863. 

[65] 


DBCEMBER      15,      1863 

I  Leslie  J.  Perry,  "Appeals  to  Lincoln's  Clemency,"  The  Century 


ington,  Ky.,  a  prisoner  of  war  at  Camp  Douglas,  Chicago,  in  company  with 
other  Confederate  prisoners  made  his  escape  from  that  military  prison  on  the 
night  of  December  2,  1862  [1863?],  and  made  his  way  to  the  house  of  his 
brother-in-law,  Dr.  L.  W.  Brown,  who  resided  thirteen  miles  east  of  Jackson- 
ville Morgan  County,  111.  Dr.  Brown  was  a  loyal  man,  and  advised  Warfield, 
who  was  a  lad  of  only  eighteen,  to  surrender  himself  to  the  Union  military 
authorities  and  then  take  the  oath  of  allegiance.  This  he  did  at  Jacksonville, 
after  which  a  petition  signed  by  Governor  Yates,  Senator  Trumbull,  E.  B.  \\  ash- 
burne,  I.  N.  Arnold,  and  several  other  political  notabilities,  was  forwarded  to 
the  President  for  his  release."  Orville  H.  Browning's  Diary  records  under  date 
of  December  14,  1863,  that  he  visited  Lincoln  with  Dr.  Brown  "to  try  and  get 
Henry  Warfield,  a  lad  of  18  years  old,  a  rebel  Prisoner  at  Camp  Douglas,  and 
a  brother  in  law  of  Dr  Brown,  committed  to  the  custody  of  the  Dr.  Got  a 
preliminary  order  which  was  finally  completed  after  passing  thro  several  offices 
to  the  Commissary  of  Prisoners.  .  .  ." 

To  Thomas  Cottman1 

Dr.  Thomas  Cottman  Executive  Mansion, 

My  Dear  Sir  Washington,  December  15,  1863. 

You  were  so  kind  as  to  say  this  morning  that  you  desire  to  re- 
turn to  Louisiana,  and  to  be  guided  by  my  wishes,  to  some  extent, 
in  the  part  you  may  take  in  bringing  that  state  to  resume  her  right- 
ful relation  to  the  general  government. 

My  wishes  are  in  a  general  way  expressed  as  well  as  I  can  ex- 
press them,  in  the  Proclamation  issued  on  the  8th  of  the  present 
month,  and  in  that  part  of  the  annual  message  which  relates  to 
that  proclamation.  It  there  appears  that  I  deem  the  sustaining  of 
the  emancipation  proclamation,  where  it  applies,  as  indispensable; 
and  I  add  here  that  I  would  esteem  it  fortunate,  if  the  people  of 
Louisiana  should  themselves  place  the  remainder  of  the  stnte  upon 
the  same  footing,  and  then,  if  in  their  discretion  it  should  appear 
best,  make  some  temporary  provision  for  the  whole  of  the  freed 
people,  substantially  as  suggested  in  the  last  proclamation.  I  have 
not  put  forth  the  plan  in  that  proclamation,  as  a  Procrustean  bed, 
to  which  exact  conformity  is  to  be  indispensable;  and  in  Louisiana 
particularly,  I  wish  that  labor  already  done,  which  varies  from 
that  plan  in  no  important  particular,  may  not  be  thrown  away. 

The  strongest  wish  I  have,  not  already  publicly  expressed,  is  that 
in  Louisiana  and  elsewhere,  all  sincere  Union  men  would  stoutly 
eschew  chqueism,  and,  each  yielding  something  in  minor  matters 
all  work  together.  Nothing  is  likely  to  be  so  baleful  in  the  great 
work  before  us,  as  stepping  aside  of  the  main  object  to  consider  who 
will  get  the  offices  if  a  small  matter  shall  go  thus,  and  who  else  will 

[66] 


DECEMBER      ±5,      1863 

get  them,  if  it  shall  go  otherwise.  It  is  a  time  now  for  real  patriots 
to  rise  above  all  this.  As  to  the  particulars  of  what  I  may  think  best 
to  be  done  in  any  state,  I  have  publicly  stated  certain  points,  which 
I  have  thought  indispensable  to  the  reestablishment  and  mainte- 
nance of  the  national  authority;  and  I  go  no  further  than  this  be- 
cause I  wish  to  avoid  both  the  substance  and  the  appearance  of 
dictation. 

i  Copy,  DLC-RTL. 

To  WiUiam  E  Fessenden1 

December  15,  1863 

Mr.  Fessenden  will  see  the  objection  to  the  pardon  applied  for,  as 
made  at  the  Attorney  General's  office.  Could  not  he  &  the  others 
of  the  Maine  delegation  fortyfy  me  a  little  stronger?  Something 
from  the  Judge  &  jury  or  District  Attorney  would  be  in  point. 
Dec.  15.  1863  A.  LINCOLN 

Atty.  Genl.  please  file.          A.  LINCOLN 
April  8.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  495.  Lincoln's  endorsements 
are  written  on  the  envelope  containing  Fessenden's  letter  of  December  4,  1863, 
transmitting  a  petition  for  pardon  of  Josiah  M.  Sargent  sentenced  to  nine  years* 
imprisonment  for  robbing  a  post  office.  On  Fessenden's  letter  appears  the  follow- 
ing endorsement  by  John  Hay  dated  December  11:  "The  President  directs  me 
to  request  that  you  will  cause  a  pardon  to  be  prepared  in  this  case,  unless  there 
appear  to  you  reasons  to  the  contrary." 

To  Mother  Mary  Gonyeag1 

Mother  Mary  Gonyeag  Executive  Mansion 

Sup.  Academy  of  Visitation  Washington  D.C. 

Keokuk,  Iowa  Dec.  15.  1863 

The  President  has  no  authority  as  to  whether  you  may  raffle  for 
the  benevolent  object  you  mention.  If  there  is  no  objection  in  the 
Iowa  laws,  there  is  none  here.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  communication  from  Mother  Mary  Gonyeag  has  been  found. 

To  Ogden  Hoffman1 

Hon.  Ogden  Hoffman  Executive  Mansion 

U.S.  District  Judge  Washington,  D.C. 

San  Francisco,  California  Dec.  15.  1863. 

The  oath  in  the  proclamation  of  Dec.  8th.  is  intended  for  those 
who  may  voluntarily  take  it,  and  not  for  those  who  may  be  con- 

[67] 


DECEMBER      15,     1863 

strained  to  take  it,  in  order  to  escape  actual  imprisonment  or  pun- 
ishment. It  is  intended  that  the  latter  class  shall  abide  the  granting 
or  withholding  of  the  pardoning  power  in  the  ordinary  way. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

i  ALS,  RPB.  No  prior  communication  from  Judge  Hoffman  has  been  located, 
but  on  December  15  Hoffman  replied  to  Lincoln's  telegram:  "Your  Excellency's 
dispatch  is  received.  I  most  respectfully  suggest  inasmuch  as  the  Proclamation 
does  not  in  terms  except  the  persons  referred  to  by  you  in  your  dispatch  &  as 
it  is  a  public  official  document  which  a  court  is  compelled  to  construe*  according 
to  its  terms  whether  it  be  not  expedient  to  declare  by  our  equally  formal  docu- 
ment the  intention  of  the  Executive  in  making  it."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  [15],  1863 

I  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action  thereon,  a 
treaty  concluded  at  the  city  of  Washington  on  the  sixth  day  of 
April,  1863,  between  John  P.  Usher,  commissioner  on  the  part  of 
the  United  States,  and  the  chiefs  and  headmen  of  the  Comanc.ho, 
Kiowa,  and  Apache  tribes  of  Indians,  duly  authorized  thereto. 

A  letter  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  of  the  i2th  in  slant  ac- 
companies the  treaty.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

December,  1863. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  313.  On  April  5,  1864,  the  treaty  was  reported 
from  the  Committee  on  Indian  Affairs  without  amendment,  but  no  further 
action  was  taken. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  [15],  i  8fv$ 

I  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action  thoreoru  a 
treaty  concluded  at  LeRoy,  Kansas,  on  the  twenty-ninth  clay  of 
August,  1863,  between  William  E  Dole,  Commissioner  of  Indian 
Affairs,  and  William  G.  Coffin,  superintendent  of  Indian  affairs  of 
the  Southern  Superintendency,  commissioners  on  the  part  of  iho 
United  States,  and  the  chiefs  and  headmen  of  the  Great  and  Little 
Osage  tribe  of  Indians  of  the  State  of  Kansas. 

A  communication  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  dated  tho 
1  2th  instant,  accompanies  the  treaty.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

December,  1863. 


ratified  with  amendments  or: 
[68] 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  [15],  1863 

I  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action  thereon,  a 
treaty  concluded  at  the  Sac  and  Fox  Agency,  in  Kansas,  on  the  2d 
day  of  September,  1863,  between  William  E  Dole,  Commissioner 
of  Indian  Affairs,  commissioner  on  the  part  of  the  United  States, 
and  the  New  York  Indians,  represented  by  duly  authorized  mem- 
bers of  the  bands  of  said  tribe. 

A  letter  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  of  the  1 2th  instant  ac- 
companies the  treaty.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

December,  1863. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  313.  On  December  15,  1863,  the  treaty  was  re- 
ferred to  the  Committee  on  Indian  Affairs,  but  no  further  action  was  taken. 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  [15],  1863 

I  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action  thereon,  a 
treaty  concluded  at  the  Sac  and  Fox  Agency  in  Kansas  on  the  3d 
day  of  September,  1863,  between  William  P  Dole,  Commissioner  of 
Indian  Affairs,  and  William  G.  Coffin,  superintendent  of  Indian 
affairs  for  the  Southern  Superintendency,  on  the  part  of  the  United 
States,  and  the  Creek  Nation  of  Indians,  represented  by  its  chiefs. 

A  letter  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  dated  the  12th  in- 
stant, accompanies  the  treaty.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

December,  1863. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  314.  The  treaty  was  ratified  with  amendments  on 
March  8,  1864. 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  [15],  1863 

I  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action  thereon,  a 
treaty  concluded  at  the  Sac  and  Fox  Agency,  in  Kansas,  on  the 
fourth  day  of  September,  1863,  between  William  P.  Dole,  Commis- 
sioner of  Indian  Affairs,  and  Henry  W.  Martin,  agent  for  the  Sacs 
and  Foxes,  commissioners  on  the  part  of  the  United  States,  and  the 
united  tribes  of  Sac  and  Fox  Indians  of  the  Mississippi. 

[69] 


DECEMBER      1  5:>     *863 

A  letter  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  dated  the  i2th  in- 
stant, accompanies  the  treaty.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 
Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
December,  1863. 

i  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  3*4-  The  treaty  was  ratified  with  amendments  on 
July  2,  1864. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  [15]?  l863 

I  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action  thereon, 
a  treaty  concluded  on  the  7th  day  of  October,  1863,  at  Conejos, 
Colorado  Territory,  between  John  Evans,  governor  and  ex-officio 
superintendent  of  Indian  affairs  of  said  Territory,  Michael  Steck, 
superintendent  of  Indian  affairs  for  the  Territory  of  New  Mexico, 
Simeon  Whitely  and  Lafayette  Head,  Indian  agents,  commission- 
ers on  the  part  of  the  United  States,  and  the  chiefs  and  warriors  of 
the  Tabequache  band  of  Utah  Indians. 

I  also  transmit  a  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  of  the 
12th  instant,  submitting  the  treaty;  an  extract  from  the  last  annual 
report  of  Governor  Evans,  of  Colorado  Territory,  relating  to  its 
negotiation;  and  a  map  upon  which  is  delineated  the  boundaries 
of  the  country  ceded  by  the  Indians,  and  that  retained  for  their 
own  use.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

December,  1863. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  314.  The  treaty  was  ratified  with  amendments  on 
March  25,  1864. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  1 5,  1 863 

In  answer  to  the  Resolution  of  the  Senate  of  the  i  ith.  of  March 
last,  requesting  certain  information  touching  persons  in  the  serv- 
ice of  this  Government,  I  transmit  a  report  from  the  Secretary  of 
State,  to  whom  the  resolution  was  referred. 

Washington,  ±5th.  Deer.  1863.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38A  F3.  Lincoln's  letter  together  with  SewarcTs 
report  was  referred  to  the  Committee  on  the  Judiciary,  which  on  January  25, 

M«tlT?!  ^«fi  gen  *ZT  fUrther  consi^ration  of  the  report.  The  resolution  of 
March  11,  1863,  called  for  a  report  on  the  aggregate  number  of  civil  employees 
of  the  government  subject  to  removal  by  the  president  or  any  other  officer 
and  the  aggregate  amount  of  pay  received  by  them.  oincer, 

[70] 


Memorandum  Concerning  Louisiana  Affairs1 

December  16,  1863 

On  very  full  consideration  I  do  not  wish  to  say  more  than  I  have 
publicly  said,  and  said  in  the  letter  delivered  to  Dr.  Cottman  yes- 
terday. A.  LINCOLN 
Dec.  16.  1863. 

1  AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  John  L. 
Riddell,  noted  chemist,  botanist,  and  professor  in  the  medical  department  of 
University  of  Louisiana,  New  Orleans,  December  15,  1863,  requesting  that  the 
president  so  instruct  military  authorities  in  Louisiana  "that  our  loyal  ef- 
forts .  .  .  may  be  facilitated  and  not  discouraged  or  prevented.  It  is  proper  to 
state,  that  a  comparatively  small  party  of  over  zealous  men  .  .  .  ignoring  and 
contravening  the  constitution  of  the  state  .  .  .  are  laboring  to  call  a  state  con- 
vention, whose  delegates  are  to  be  voted  for  by  residents  of  six  months,  instead 
of  a  year,  the  constitutional  time;  and  by  free  negroes,  who  do  not  possess  the 
right  of  voting  under  the  constitution.  .  .  ." 


Pardon  of  Alfred  Rubery1 

[December  16,  1863?] 

Whereas  one  Alfred  Rubery  was  convicted  on  or  about  the 
twelfth  day  of  October  1863,  in  the  Circuit  Court  of  the  United 
States  for  the  District  of  California,  of  engaging  in,  and  giving  aid 
and  comfort  to  the  existing  rebellion  against  the  Government  of 
this  country,  and  sentenced  to  ten  years'  imprisonment,  and  to  pay 
a  fine  of  ten  thousand  dollars; 

And  whereas,  the  said  Alfred  Rubery  is  of  the  immature  age  of 
twenty  years,  and  of  highly  respectable  parentage; 

And  whereas,  the  said  Alfred  Rubery  is  a  subject  of  Great  Brit- 
ain, and  his  pardon  is  desired  by  John  Bright,  of  England; 

Now  therefore,  be  it  known  that  I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President 
of  the  United  States  of  America,  these  and  divers  other  considera- 
tions me  thereunto  moving,  and  especially  as  a  public  mark  of  the 
esteem  held  by  the  United  States  of  America  for  the  high  charac- 
ter and  steady  friendship  of  the  said  John  Bright,  do  hereby  grant 
a  pardon  to  the  said  Alfred  Rubery,  the  same  to  begin  and  take 
effect  on  the  twentieth  day  of  January,  1864,  on  condition  that 
he  leave  the  country  within  thirty  days  from  and  after  that  date. 

1  George  M.  Trevelyan,  The  Life  of  John  Bright,  p.  296.  Although  undated 
and  unsigned  as  given  in  the  source,  this  pardon  has  been  dated  from  a  des- 
patch of  December  16,  1863,  appearing  in  the  New  York  Times  for  December 

17: 

"The  President  to-day  pardoned  Alfred  Rubers  [$zc],  a  young  Englishman, 
convicted  of  high  treason  for  having  fitted  out  a  secesh  privateer  at  San  Fran- 

[71] 


DECEMBER      1  6,      1863 

Cisco  in  October  and  sentenced  to  ten  years  imprisonment  and  a  fine  of  J^ooo 
The  pardon  was  soHcited  by  John  Bright  through  Senator  Sumner  and  the 
President  m  the  body  of  it  expresses  his  high  gratification  at  havmg  been  able 
to  oblige  a  devoted  English  friend  of  the  Union." 

Proclamation  Concerning  Discriminating  Duties1 

December  16,  1863 

By  the  President  of  the  United  States  of  America: 
A  Proclamation. 

Whereas,  by  an  act  of  the  Congress  of  the  United  States  of  the 
24th.  of  May,  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-eight,  en- 
titled "An  Act  in  addition  to  an  act  entitled  'An  act  concerning 
discriminating  duties  of  Tonnage  and  Impost'  and  to  equalize  the 
duties  on  Prussian  vessels  and  their  cargoes/''  it  is  provided  that, 
upon  satisfactory  evidence  being  given  to  the  President  of  the 
United  States,  by  the  government  of  any  foreign  nation,  that  no 
discriminating  duties  of  tonnage  or  impost  are  imposed  or  levied 
in  the  ports  of  the  said  nation,  upon  vessels  wholly  belonging  to 
citizens  of  the  United  States,  or  upon  the  produce,  manufactures, 
or  merchandise,  imported  in  the  same  from  the  United  States,  or 
from  any  foreign  country,  the  President  is  thereby  authorized  to 
issue  his  proclamation,  declaring  that  the  foreign  discriminating 
duties  of  tonnage  and  impost  within  the  United  States  are,  and  shall 
be,  suspended  and  discontinued,  so  far  as  respects  the  vessels  of  the 
said  foreign  nation,  and  the  produce,  manufactures  or  merchan- 
dise, imported  into  the  United  States  in  the  same  from  the  said 
foreign  nation,  or  from  any  other  foreign  country;  the  said  suspen- 
sion to  take  effect  from  the  time  of  such  notification  being  given 
to  the  President  of  the  United  States,  and  to  continue  so  long  as 
the  reciprocal  exemption  of  vessels,  belonging  to  citizens  of  the 
United  States,  and  their  cargoes,  as  aforesaid,  shall  be  continued, 
and  no  longer. 

And  whereas,  satisfactory  evidence  has  lately  been  received  hv 
me,  through  an  official  communication  of  Senor  Don  Luis  Molina, 
Envoy  Extraordinary  and  Minister  Plenipotentiary  of  the  Republic 
of  Nicaragua,  under  date  of  the  28th.  of  November,  i8fv$,  that  no 
other  or  higher  duties  of  tonnage  and  impost  have  been  imposed  or 
levied  since  the  second  day  of  August,  1838,  in  the  ports  of  Nica- 
ragua upon  vessels  wholly  belonging  to  citizens  of  the  United 
States,  and  upon  the  produce,  manufactures,  or  merchandize  im- 
ported in  the  same  from  the  United  States,  and  from  any  foreign 

[72] 


DECEMBER      1  6,       1863 

country  whatever,  than  are  levied  on  Nicaraguan  ships  and  their 
cargoes,  in  the  same  ports  under  like  circumstances: 

Now,  therefore,  I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President  of  the  United 
States  of  America,  do  hereby  declare  and  proclaim,  that  so  much 
of  the  several  acts  imposing  discriminating  duties  of  tonnage  and 
impost  within  the  United  States  are,  and  shall  be,  suspended  and 
discontinued,  so  far  as  respects  the  vessels  of  Nicaragua,  and  the 
produce,  manufactures,  and  merchandise,  imported  into  the  United 
States  in  the  same,  from  the  dominions  of  Nicaragua,  and  from 
any  other  foreign  country  whatever,  the  said  suspension  to  take 
effect  from  the  day  above  mentioned,  and  to  continue  thencefor- 
ward, so  long  as  the  reciprocal  exemption  of  the  vessels  of  the 
United  States,  and  the  produce,  manufactures,  and  merchandise 
imported  into  the  dominions  of  Nicaragua,  in  the  same  as  aforesaid, 
shall  be  continued  on  the  part  of  the  government  of  Nicaragua. 

Given  under  my  hand,  at  the  city  of  Washington,  the  sixteenth 
day  of  December,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand 
[L.S.]  eight  hundred  and  sixty -three^  and  the  eighty-eighth  of 

the  Independence  of  the  United  States. 

By  the  President:  ABRAHAM 

WILLIAM  H  SEWARD  Secretary  of  State. 

1  DS,  DNA  FS  RG  11,  Proclamations. 


To  Worthington  G.  Snethen1 

W.  G.  Snethen  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  December  16.  1863. 

The  application  filed  by  you  in  behalf  of  Samuel  K.  Boyd,  to  be 
a  Captain  in  the  regular  Army  has  been  received,  and  referred  to 
the  War  Department.  You  may  not  be  aware  that  the  application 
is  directly  in  the  teeth  of  a  rule  which  we  have  felt  constrained  to 
adopt.  Suppose  your  relative  were  now  a  First  Lieut,  in  the  regular 
Army,  and  the  Captaincy  directly  above  him  were  vacant,  he 
would  be  entitled  to  be  promoted  to  that  vacancy.  But  suppose  I 
should  say  to  him  "Stand  back  sir;  I  want  that  place  for  outsider" 
what  would  you  and  he  think  of  it?  And  yet  that  is  precisely  the 
way  you  you  [s/c]  now  ask  me  to  treat  some  other  Lieutenant.  I 
suppose  you  have  not  thought  of  this.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Foreman  M.  Lebold,  Chicago,  Illinois.  Worthington  G. 
Snethen  was  a  merchant  at  Baltimore.  No  record  has  been  found  of  Samuel  K. 
Boyd's  appointment. 

[73] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

It  is  said  Gen.  Buford  can  not  live  through  this  day;  and  it  [is] 
suggested  that  he  be  nominated  as  a  Major  General. 
Dec.  16.  1863.  A-  LlNCOLN 

i  ALS,  NWM.  Brigadier  General  John  Buford  died  at  Washington  on  De- 
cember 16  a  few  hours  after  his  commission  as  major  general  had  been  put  in 
fojg  Hands. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec,  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  December  16.  1863. 

I  am  so  repeatedly  applied  to  for  leave  to  Mrs.  Upshur,  (widow 
of  Sec.  Upshur2)  her  sister,  and  grand-child  to  come  on  the  flag-of 
truce  boat  from  City  Point,  that  I  shall  be  obliged  if  you  will  per- 
mit it.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  NNC.  Stanton  endorsed  on  the  bottom  of  the  letter,  "Let  the  pass  be 
issued  by  order  of  the  President."  A  letter  from  John  F.  Lee,  Upper  Marlboro, 
Maryland,  to  Montgomery  Blair,  November  22,  1863,  is  as  follows: 

"Will  you  get  from  the  President,  a  pass  for  Mrs.  E.  A.  B.  Upshur,  her 
sister  Miss  Sally  Upshur,  and  her  grandchild  James  Ringgold,  to  come  on  the 
flag  of  truce  boat  to  Old  point  comfort,  (there  is  no  other  way  of  coming)  and 
thence  to  their  home  in  Washington. 

"They  went  before  the  war  to  the  mountains  of  Va,  as  always  before  in  sum- 
mer, and  did  not  come  back. 

"I  am  executor  of  the  child's  father,  administrator  of  his  mother,  and  hold 
his  property  .  .  .  Mrs.  Upshur's  age  &  health  make  it  necessary  that  her  sister 
should  live  with  her.  I  beleive  the  President  will  willingly  grant  the  permis- 
sion. He  said  before,  that  he  wished  good  people  to  return.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

2  Abel  P.  Upshur,  secretary  of  the  Navy  (1841-1843)  and  secretary  of  State 
(1843-1844). 


To  Edward  Bates1 

December  17,  1863 

In  addition  to  the  within  letter,  I  have  personal  knowledge  of  this 
case,  and  have  concluded  to  ask  the  Attorney  General  to  make  out 
a  pardon  at  once.  I  believe  the  sentence  was  for  eight  years 
[Dec.  17,  1863  A.  LINCOLN] 


^  ^  D^A  ^  a04-  ^'S'  ?ard°n  Attorney,  A  428.  The  date  and  signature 
have  been  clipped  from  the  endorsement,  which  is  written  on  a  letter  sijned  by 
John  Dougherty,  December  16,  1863,  asking  pardon  of  Newton  F.  Jones,  con- 

mai1  at  ****•  Illinois'  and  sentenced 


[74] 


To  James  H.  Hoes1 

Executive  Mansion, 
My  Dear  Sir  Washington,  December  17,  1863. 

I  have  received  from  the  Sanitary  Commission  of  Chicago,  the 
Watch  which  you  placed  at  their  disposal,  and  I  take  the  liberty 
of  conveying  to  you  my  high  appreciation  of  your  humanity  and 
generosity,  of  which  I  have  unexpectedly  become  the  beneficiary. 
I  am  very  truly  yours  A.  LINCOLN 

James  H.  Hoes  Esq 

1  LS,  CSmH.  As  managers  of  the  Northwestern  Sanitary  Fair  at  Chicago, 
Mrs.  Abraham  H.  Hoge  and  Mrs.  David  P.  Livermore,  wrote  Lincoln  on  No- 
vember 26,  1863:  "Among  the  many  remarkable  incidents  of  our  recent  Fair, 
not  one  has  been  more  pleasant,  than  the  duty  that  devolves  upon  us,  of  con- 
signing to  you,  on  this  National  Thanksgiving  Day,  the  accompanying  watch; 
of  asking  you  to  accept  it,  as  a  memorial  of  the  Ladies  N.  Western  Fair.  During 
the  progress  of  the  Fair,  Mr.  James  H.  Hoes,  Jeweller  of  Chicago,  a  most  loyal 
and  liberal  man,  after  giving  very  largely  himself,  in  order  to  stimulate  do- 
nations from  others,  proposed  through  the  columns  of  the  Tribune,  to  give  a 
gold  watch  to  the  largest  contributor  to  the  Fair.  .  .  .  Emancipation  Procla- 
mation .  .  .  was  sold  for  $3,000,  the  largest  benefaction  of  any  individual.  .  .  ." 
(DLC-RTL). 

To  Stephen  A.  Hurlbut1 

"Cypher" 

Major  General  Hurlbut  Executive  Mansion 

Memphis,  Tenn.  Washington,  D.C.  Dec.  17.  1863. 

I  understand  you  have,  under  sentence  of  death,  a  tall  old  man, 
by  the  name  of  Henry  F.  Luckett.  I  personally  knew  him,  and 
did  not  think  him  a  bad  man.  Please  do  not  let  him  be  executed, 
unless  upon  further  order  from  me,  and,  in  the  mean  time,  send  me 
a  transcript  of  the  record.  A.  LINCOLN 

"Henry  F  Luckett" 

1  ALS,  RPB.  On  December  22  General  Hurlbut  replied  to  Lincoln's  telegram: 
"The  record  in  Lucketts  case  has  been  sent  to  Gen  Grant  long  since  He  is 
guilty  of  smuggling  percussions  caps  to  the  enemy  but  his  friends  say  is  in- 
sane Mr  Luckett  is  in  prison  here  awaiting  action  on  his  case."  Henry  F. 
Luckett  was  a  former  resident  of  Springfield,  Illinois.  See  Lincoln's  order  for 
pardon  of  Luckett,  March  30,  1864,  infra. 

Memorandum:  Removal  of  James  L.  Ridgely1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  Dec.  17,  1863. 
To-day  Hon.  Mr.  Webster,  M.C.  with  Messrs  Hoffman,  Lester, 
Poteat,  Lusby,  representing  that  Gen.  Pierce,  Mr.  Wright,  and 

[75] 


DECEMBER      1/5      ^83 

Mr  Given,  Senator,  agree  with  them,  call,  and  ask  that  James  L. 
Ridgely,  be  restored  as  Collector  of  Internal  Revenue,  in  the  2nd. 
District.  They  say  the  grounds  of  his  removal  were  misrepresenta- 
tions, and  that  Mr.  Stuart,  sought  nominations  in  several  conven- 
tions, &  failing  bolted  the  nominations  made  this  year.  The  States 
Attorney  for  Baltimore  Co.  also  concurs,  &  in  fact,  they  say  the 
entire  county  organization  concurs.  These  members  are  all  for 
emancipation. 

i  AD,  DLC-RTL.  James  L.  Ridgely  had  been  appointed  collector  of  internal 
revenue  at  Baltimore,  but  was  not  so  actively  in  favor  of  emancipation  ns  a  fac- 
tion of  the  party  thought  he  should  be.  He  was  replaced  by  Joseph  J.  Stewart, 
whose  nomination  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  April  20,  1864.  On  April 
21,  1864,  Ridgely's  nomination  as  tax  commissioner  for  North  Carolina  was 
also  confirmed  by  the  Senate,  doubtless  as  compensation  for  his  removal  from 
his  previous  Maryland  post.  Of  the  persons  named  by  Lincoln,  Henry  W.  Hoff- 
man, Edwin  H.  Webster,  and  State  Senator  John  S.  Given  were  certainly  three, 
but  the  others  have  not  been  positively  identified. 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  December  17,  1863 

I  transmit  to  the  Senate,  for  consideration  with  a  view  to  its 
ratification,  a  Convention  between  the  United  States  and  Her  Bri- 
tannic Majesty,  for  the  final  adjustment  of  the  claims  of  the  Hud- 
son's Bay  and  Puget  Sound  Agricultural  Companies,  signed  in 
this  City,  on  the  first  day  of  July,  last.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  i/th.  December,  1863. 

*  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  3QB  BS.  The  treaty  was  ratified  by  the  Srrmte  on 
January  18,  1864. 


To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

December  17.  1863 
To  the  Senate,  and  House  of  Representatives 

Herewith  I  lay  before  you  a  letter  addressed  to  myself  by  a 
Committee  of  gentlemen  representing  the  Freedman's  Aid  Socie- 
ties in  Boston,  New-York,  Philadelphia  and  Cincinnati.  The  subject 
of  the  letter,  as  indicated  above,  is  one  of  great  magnitude,  and  im- 
portance, and  one  which  these  gentlemen,  of  known  ability  and 
high  character,  seem  to  have  considered  with  great  attention  and 
care.  Not  having  the  time  to  form  a  mature  judgment  of  mv  own 
as  to  whether  the  plan  they  suggest  is  the  best,  I  submit  the  whole 

[76] 


DECEMBER      1  8,      ±863 

subject  to  Congress  deeming  that  their  attention  thereto  is  almost 
imperatively  demanded.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Dec.  17.  1863. 

i  ADS,  NNP;  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  F2.  The  letter  of  December  i, 
1863,  which  luincoln  transmitted,  signed  by  Stephen  Corwell  and  others,  pro- 
posed establishment  of  a  "Bureau  of  Emancipation"  to  assist  those  freed  by  the 
Emancipation  Proclamation  (See  Senate  Executive  Document  No.  i).  On  De- 
cember 8,  Representative  Thomas  D.  Eliot  of  Massachusetts  introduced  a  bill 
to  establish  a  Bureau  of  Emancipation,  which  was  referred  to  a  select  com- 
mittee on  December  14,  reported  by  Eliot  on  December  22,  and  sent  back  to 
the  committee.  No  further  action  is  recorded. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton  and  James  B.  Fry1 

December  17,   1863 

Will  the  Secretary  of  War,  and  Provost  Marshal  General  please 
consider  this  application,  and  make  good  all  that  has  been  prom- 
ised, as  applicable  to  it,  and  even  beyond  promises,  etc.  equity,  so 
far  as  practically  connected  with  the  public  service. 

Dec.  17,  1863.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Copy,  ISLA.  The  original  document  has  not  been  located,  but  a  transcript 
provided  by  an  autograph  dealer  describes  the  item  as  an  ADS,  accompanied  by 
a  manuscript  petition  of  the  city  of  New  Bedford,  Massachusetts,  signed  by 
Mayor  George  Howland,  "enumerating  certain  military  conditions,  solemn 
promises  made  to  them,  that  had  been  broken.  .  .  ." 


To  Thurlow  Weed1 

Hon.  T.  Weed.  Executive  Mansion,  Dec  17,  1863. 

Dear  Sir:  Allow  me  to  introduce  my  friends,  Joshua  F.  Speed 
and  Joshua  Tovis  of  Kentucky.  You  may  rely  implicitly  on  what- 
ever they  may  tell  you;  and  I  think  their  mission  an  important 
one.  Yours  very  truly,  A.  LINCOLN". 

1  Tracy,  p.  236.  The  mission  of  Speed  and  Tevis  has  not  been  discovered. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Will  the  Attorney  General,  please  make  out  and  send  me  a  pardon 
in  this  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.    18.    1863. 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  497.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  the  jacket  of  papers  in  the  case  of  William  H.  Knapp,  convicted 
of  defrauding  the  government  in  the  enlistment  of  soldiers. 

[77] 


Memorandum: 
Appointment  of  William  M.  Albin1 

[c.  December  18,  1863] 

Gen.  Loan  recommends  William  M  Albin  to  be  Superintendent  of 
Indian  Affairs  located  at  St.  Joseph,  Mo. 

1 AES,  DNA  RG  48,  Applications,  Indian  Agencies,  Box  1266.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  envelope  of  a  letter  signed  by  Benjamin  F  Loan 
and  others,  December  18,  1863.  William  M.  Albin's  appointment  was  confirmed 
by  the  Senate  on  March  a,  1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War:  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Dec.  18.  1863. 

I  believe  Gen.  Schofield  must  be  relieved  from  command  of  the 
Department  of  Missouri,  otherwise  a  question  of  veracity,  in  rela- 
tion to  his  declarations  as  to  his  interfering,  or  not,  with  the  Mis- 
souri Legislature,  will  be  made  with  him,  which  will  create  an 
additional  amount  of  trouble,  not  to  be  overcome  by  even  a  correct 
decision  of  the  question.  The  question  itself  must  be  avoided.  Now 
for  the  mode.  Senator  Henderson,  his  friend,  thinks  he  can  be  in- 
duced to  ask  to  be  relieved,  if  he  shall  understand  he  will  be  gen- 
erously treated;  and,  on  this  latter  point,  Gratz  Brown  will  help 
his  nomination,  as  a  Major  General,  through  the  Senate.  In  no 
other  way  can  he  be  confirmed;  and  upon  his  rejection  alone,  it 
would  be  difficult  for  me  to  sustain  him  as  Commander  of  the  De- 
partment. Besides,  his  being  relieved  from  command  of  the  De- 
partment, and  at  the  same  time  confirmed  as  a  Major  General,  will 
be  the  means  of  Henderson  and  Brown  leading  off  together  as 
friends,  and  will  go  far  to  heal  the  Missouri  difficulty. 

Another  point.  I  find  it  is  scarcely  less  than  indispensable  for 
me  to  do  something  for  Gen,  Rosecrans;  and  I  find  Henderson  and 
Brown  will  agree  to  him  for  the  commander  of  their  Department. 

Again,  I  have  received  such  evidence  and  explanations,  in  re- 
gard to  the  supposed  cotten  transactions  of  Gen.  Curtis,  as  fully  re- 
stores in  my  mind  the  fair  presumption  of  his  innocence;  and,  as 
he  is  my  friend,  and,  what  is  more,  as  I  think,  the  countries 
friend,  I  would  be  glad  to  relieve  him  from  the  impression  that  I 
think  him  dishonest,  by  giving  him  a  command.  Most  of  the  Iowa 
and  Kansas  delegations,  a  large  part  of  that  of  Missouri,  and  the 
delegates  from  Nebraska,  and  Colorado,  ask  this  in  behalf  of  Gen. 
C.  and  suggest  Kansas  and  other  contiguous  territory  West  of  Mis- 
souri, as  a  Department  for  him. 

[78] 


DECEMBER      19,      1863 

In  a  purely  military  point  of  view  it  may  be  that  none  of  these 
things  is  indispensable,  or  perhaps,  advantageous;  but  in  another 
aspect,  scarcely  less  important,  they  would  give  great  relief,  while, 
at  the  worst,  I  think  they  could  not  injure  the  military  service 
much.  I  therefore  shall  be  greatly  obliged  if  yourself  and  Gen. 
Halleck  can  give  me  your  hearty  co-operation,  in  making  the  ar- 
rangement. Perhaps  the  first  thing  would  be  to  send  Gen.  Scho- 
field's  nomination  to  me.  Let  me  hear  from  you  before  you  take 
any  actual  step  in  the  matter.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DLC-Stanton  Papers.  Under  date  of  December  13,  John  Hay's  Diary 
records  the  following: 

"The  President,  speaking  today  about  Missouri  matters,  said  he  had  heard 
some  things  of  Schofield  which  had  very  much  displeased  him:  that  while 
Washburne  was  in  Missouri  he  saw  or  thought  he  saw  that  Schofield  was  work- 
ing rather  energetically  in  the  politics  of  the  State,  and  that  he  approached 
Schofield  and  proposed  that  he  should  use  his  influence  to  harmonize  the  con- 
flicting elements  so  as  to  elect  one  of  each  wing,  Gratz  Brown  and  Henderson. 
Schofield's  reply  was  that  he  would  not  consent  to  the  election  of  Gratz  Brown. 

"Again  when  Gratz  Brown  was  about  coming  to  Washington  he  sent  a  friend 
to  Schofield  to  say  that  he  would  not  oppose  his  confirmation  if  he  (S.)  would 
so  far  as  his  influence  extended,  agree  to  a  convention  of  Missouri  to  make 
necessary  alterations  in  her  State  constitution.  Schofield's  reply,  as  reported  by 
Brown  to  the  President,  was  that  he  would  not  consent  to  a  State  convention. 
These  things,  the  President  says,  are  obviously  transcendent  of  his  instructions 
and  must  not  be  permitted.  He  has  sent  for  Schofield  to  come  to  Washington 
and  explain  these  grave  matters.  .  .  ." 

See  further  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  December  21,  infra. 

To  Elihu  B.  Washburne1 

Hon.  E.  B,  Washburne  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Dec.  18.  1863. 

The  Joint  Resolution  of  thanks  to  Gen.  Grant  &  those  under  his 
command,  has  been  before  me,  and  is  approved.  If  agreeable  to 
you,  I  shall  be  glad  for  you  to  superintend  the  getting  up  of  the 
Medal,  and  the  making  of  the  copy  to  be  be  [sic]  engrossed  on 
parchment,  which  I  am  to  transmit  to  the  General.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  The  joint  resolution  introduced  by  Washburne  on  December  8 
and  approved  by  Lincoln  on  December  18,  requested  the  president  to  "cause 
a  gold  medal  to  be  struck,  with  suitable  emblems,  devices,  and  inscriptions" 
and  to  "cause  a  copy  of  this  joint  resolution  to  be  engrossed  on  parchment"  to 
be  transmitted  to  General  Grant. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Let  a  pardon  be  made  out  for  the  unexecuted  part  of  the  sentence 
in  this  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  19.  1863. 

[79] 


DECEMBER     1  Q,     1863 

S  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  498.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
on  a  petition  Signed  by  Da*d  K   Cartter,  clerk  of  the ,D> smc :  of  Co- 
a Criminal  Court,  for  the  pardon  of  Maria  Coffman,  alias  Philips,  sen 
by  ti£  court  to  pay  a  fine  of  fifty  dollars  and  costs,  in  default  of  which 
she  was  committed  to  jail. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General,  please  make  out  a  pardon  for  Mr.  Burnam,  in 
this  case.  A-  LINCOLN 

Dec.  19.  1863. 

i  AES  CSmH  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  printed  envelope  from 
the  "Collector's  Office,  U.S.  Internal  Revenue,  First  District,  Kentucky."  The 
case  has  not  been  identified,  but  F.  H.  Sweet  Catalog  53  lists  a  presidential  par- 
don for  "John  Burnam,  a  Kentucky  rebel,"  dated  December  21,  1863. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

"Cypher" 

Major  General  Grant  Executive  Mansion 

Chattanooga,  Tenn.  Washington,  B.C.  Dec.  19.  1863. 

The  Indiana  delegation  in  Congress,  or  at  least  a  large  part  of 
them,  are  very  anxious  that  Majr.  Gen.  Milroy  shall  enter  active 
service  again,  and  I  share  in  this  feeling.  He  is  not  a  difficult  man 
to  satisfy,  sincerity  and  courage  being  his  strong  traits.  Believing 
in  our  cause,  and  wanting  to  fight  in  it,  is  the  whole  matter  with 
him.  Could  you,  without  embarrassment,  assign  him  a  place,  if  di- 
rected to  report  to  you.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1 ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  from  Grant  has  been  discovered.  AGO,  Special  Orders 
No.  169,  May  6,  1864,  sent  General  Milroy  to  Nashville,  Tennessee,  to  report 
to  General  George  H.  Thomas  for  duty  in  receiving  and  organizing  militia 
regiments  and  for  assignment  to  the  command  of  Indiana  troops  when  organ- 
ized (OR,  I,  XXXVIII,  IV,  54). 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Will  the  Sec.  of  War,  please  allow  Charles  Alexander,  named 
within,  to  go  home  with  his  relatives.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  19.  1863. 

1  AES,  owned  by  Dale  Carnegie,  New  York  City.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  petition  of  Mrs.  Mary  C.  Alexander  of  Jefferson  County,  Virginia 
to  Commissary  of  Prisoners  William  Hoffman,  November  12,  1863,  asking  re' 
lease  of  her  son  Private  Charles  A.  Alexander,  Twelfth  Virginia  Cavalry  CSA 
a  prisoner  of  war  at  Point  Lookout,  who  was  dying  of  consumption. 

[80] 


To  Gideon  Welles1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  the  Navy  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Dec.  20.  1863. 

Gen.  Gilmore,  believing  that  a  joint  movement  of  the  Army  and 
Navy  is  not  likely  to  be  made  against  Charleston  very  soon,  has 
written  asking  leave  to  operate  independently  of  the  Navy  for  a 
time.  As  this  application  comes  to  me,  I  will  thank  you  to  in- 
form me  how  long,  according  to  any  plan  or  reasonable  calculation 
of  the  Navy,  it  will  be  before  it  will  need  the  actual  co-operation  of 
the  Army  before  Charleston.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ADf  S,  DLC-RTL.  General  Quincy  A.  Gillmore  was  in  command  of  the  De- 
partment of  the  South.  For  Welles'  reply  see  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  December  ai, 
infra. 

To  Henry  C.  Wright1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  Dec  2Oth,  1863. 
"I  shall  not  attempt  to  retract  or  modify  the  emancipation  proc- 
lamation; nor  shall  I  return  to  slavery  any  person  who  is  free  by 
the  terms  of  that  proclamation,  or  by  any  of  the  acts  of  Congress." 
Henry  C.  Wright  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Care  of  Wendell  Philips 
221.  Washington  St. 
Boston-  Mass. 

1  ADS-F,  ISLA.  Henry  C.  Wright,  a  lecturing  agent  of  the  Massachusetts 
Anti-Slavery  Society,  wrote  Lincoln  on  December  16,  1863: 

"God  bless  thee,  Abraham  Lincoln!  With  all  my  heart,  &  bless  thee,  in  the 
name  of  God  &  Humanity. 

"But — mark\  I  want  nothing  of  you — you  can  do  nothing  for  me — except — 
this  one  favor  .  .  .  that  you  will  write  for  me,  &  subscribe  your  name  to  it 
— with  your  own  hand — this  sentence  in  your  late  Message — i.e. 

"  *I  shall  not  attempt  to  retract  or  modify  the  emancipation  proclamation; 
nor  shall  I  return  to  slavery  any  person,  who  is  free  by  the  terms  of  the  proc- 
lamation, or  by  any  of  the  acts  of  Congress.' 

"I  have  given  30  years  of  my  life  to  the  Abolition  of  slavery — by  lecturing, 
by  public  &  private  discussions,  &  by  scattering,  broad  cast,  tracts  &  pamphlets 
bearing  on  that  subject.  I  regard  the  American  Republic  as  the  God-appointed 
Messiah  of  Liberty  to  the  great  family  of  Nations.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL) . 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Dec.  21,  1863. 

Please  send  me  a  nomination  for  Henry  Hammond,  as  Marshal 
of  Connecticut.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

[81] 


DECEMBER     21,      1863 

i  ALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  See  Lincoln's  letter  to  Foster  and  Dixon,  infra.  Henry  Hammonds 
appointment  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  January  18,  1864. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  Gen.  Butler  Executive  Mansion 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington  B.C.  Dec.  21.  1863. 

It  is  said  that  William  H.  Blake  is  under  sentence  of  death  at 
Fort-Magruder,  in  your  Department.  Do  not  let  him  be  executed 
without  further  order  from  me,  &  in  the  mean  time  have  the  record 
sent  me.  He  is  said  to  belong  to  the  ist.  or  2nd.  Pennsylvania 
Artillery.  A. 


i  ALS,  RPB.  General  Butler  replied  on  December  22:  "Private  Wm.  H.  Blake 
Batty  E  ist.  Perm  Artillery,  is  under  sentence  of  death  by  hanging  for  murder. 
In  my  judgment  a  very  deliberate  one.  He  will  not  be  executed  without  further 
orders  from  you.  The  records  were  forwarded  on  the  igth.  inst.  to  Col  Holt." 

William  H.  Blake's  sentence  for  the  murder  of  Stephen  Redson,  Battery  E, 
First  Pennsylvania  Artillery,  was  commuted  to  life  imprisonment  (AGO,  Special 
Orders  No.  14,  January  11,  1864),  and  on  April  27,  1864,  he  received  a  presi- 
dential pardon  (DNA  WB.  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1201), 

To  Lafayette  S.  Foster  and  James  Dixon1 

Hon.  Senators  Executive  Mansion, 

Foster  &  Dixon.  Washington,  Dec.  21,  1863. 

The  Marshalship  of  Connecticut  has  given  me  some  trouble.  Of 
the  Sec.  of  the  Navy,  Gov.  of  the  State,  two  Senators,  and  three 
Representatives  in  Congress,  who  have  made  recommendations, 
two  are  for  Mr.  Nichols,  two  for  Mr.  Hammond,  two  for  Mr.  Bar- 
num,  and  one  for  Mr.  Phelps.2  Nothing  has  been  said  to  me  against 
the  integrity  or  capacity  of  any  of  these  candidates.  So  far  as 
stated,  three  of  them  are  equally  well  presented.  Something  more 
than  a  year  ago  Mr.  Hammond  was  so  well  presented  to  me  for 
one  of  the  Internal  Revenue  offices,  that  it  was  with  great  regret 
I  felt  constrained  to  decline  giving  it  to  him;  and  I  then  wrote  one 
of  his  friends  substantially  that  I  would  be  glad  of  a  future  oppor- 
tunity to  recognize  him.  I  think  I  should  now  do  this  when  he 
stands  at  least  the  equal  of  any  competitor,  on  other  grounds.  Ac- 
cordingly I  send  up  his  nomination.  Please  show,  or  state  this  to  the 
other  gentlemen.  Your  Obt.  Servt.  A.  LINCOLN 

Since  writing  the  above  I  have  seen  letters  from  six  different 
and  as  I  understand,  respectable  and  influential  citizens  of  Connec- 
ticut, protesting  against  the  appointment  of  Mr.  Hammond. 

[82] 


DECEMBER     2  15      ±863 

Also  a  very  respectable  recommendation  of  Mr.  Barnum,  by 
citizens. 

Also  a  letter  of  Mr.  Barmim  himself,  saying  "If  Mr.  Hammond 
of  this  State  receives  the  Appt.  I  am  fully  satisfied,  but  I  am  not 
willing  to  withdraw  in  favor  of  any  other  person" 

Also  a  letter  of  Gov.  Buckingham,  adhering  to  his  recommen- 
dation of  Mr.  Nichols,  but  speaking  in  very  high  terms  of  Mr. 
Hammond. 

These  things,  taken  together,  do  not  change  my  purpose. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Newton  C,  Brainard,  Hartford,  Connecticut.  See  Lincoln's 
letter  to  Bates,  supra. 

2  Philo  F.  Barnum  was  a  resident  of  Bridgeport,  Connecticut.  Nichols  and 
Phelps  have  not  been  identified. 

To  Francis  H.  Peirpoint1 

Governor  Pierpoint  Executive  Mansion 

Alexandria,  Va.  Washington,  D.C.  Dec.  21.  1863 

Please  come  up  and  see  me  to-day.          A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Peirpoint  had  been  elected  governor  of  the  "Restored  Govern- 
ment" of  Virginia,  with  its  capital  at  Alexandria.  Lincoln  may  have  wished  to 
consult  him  in  connection  with  the  calling  of  a  constitutional  convention  to 
abolish  slavery,  or  concerning  the  Amnesty  Proclamation  of  December  8,  1863. 
John  Hay's  Diary  under  date  of  December  25,  records: 

"The  President  today  got  up  a  plan  for  extending  to  the  people  of  the  rebel- 
lious districts  the  practical  benefits  of  his  proclamation.  He  is  to  send  record 
books  to  various  points  to  receive  subscriptions  to  the  oath,  for  which  certificates 
will  be  given  to  the  man  taking  the  oath.  He  has  also  prepared  a  placard  him- 
self giving  notice  of  the  openings  of  the  books  and  the  nature  of  the  oath  re- 
quired. 

"He  sent  the  first  of  these  books  to  Pierpoint  to  use  in  Virginia.  The  second 
he  will  probably  send  to  Arkansas." 

Permit  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  Craig1 

Executive  Mansion,  December  21,  1863. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Craig,  of  Arkansas,  whose  plantation,  situated  upon 
the  Mississippi  River  a  few  miles  below  Helena,  has  been  deso- 
lated during  the  present  war,  propose  returning  to  reoccupy  and 
cultivate  said  plantation;  and  it  is  my  wish  that  they  be  permitted 
to  do  so,  and  that  the  United  States  military  forces  in  that  vicinity 
will  not  molest  them  or  allow  them  to  be  molested,  as  long  as  the 
said  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Craig  shall  demean  themselves  as  peaceful,  loyal 
citizens  of  the  United  States.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

1  NH,  IX,  268.  Mrs.  Charles  Craig  was  related  to  John  T.  Stuart,  who  wrote 
to  his  wife  from  Washington  on  December  20,  1863,  ".  .  .  Last  night  Sue  ac- 

[83] 


DECEMBER     21,      1863 

ised  to  have  the  papers  made  out  for  her  by  tomorrow.  .  .  .     (ALS,  Uii-btuart 
Papers). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War,  please  hear  Mr.  Browning,  and  grant  his  re- 
quest about  the  Lady  going  to  her  husband,  if  you  consistently  can. 
Dec.  21.  1863.  A-  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  InU.  Lincoln's  note  is  written  on  both  sides  of  a  small  card.  The  lady 
has  not  been  identified. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Private 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  December  21,  1863. 

Sending  a  note  to  the  Secretary  of  the  Navy  as  I  promised,  he 
called  over  and  said  that  the  strikes  in  the  Ship-yards  had  thrown 
the  completion  of  vessels  back  so  much,  that  he  thought  Gen.  Gil- 
mores  proposition  entirely  proper.  He  only  wishes  (and  in  which  I 
concur)  that  Gen.  Gilmore  will  courteously  confer  with  and  ex- 
plain to  Admiral  Dahlgren. 

In  regard  to  the  Western  matter,  I  believe  the  programme  will 
have  to  stand  substantially  as  I  first  put  it.  Henderson  and  especial- 
ly Brown  believe  that  the  social  influences  of  St.  Louis  would  in- 
evitably tell  injuriously  upon  Gen.  Pope,  in  the  particular  diffi- 
culty existing  there;  and  I  think  there  is  some  force  in  that  view. 
As  to  retaining  Gen.  S.  temporarily,  if  this  should  be  done,  I  be- 
lieve I  should  scarcely  be  able  to  get  his  nomination  through  the 
Senate.  Send  me  over  his  nomination,  which  however  I  am  not  vet 
quite  ready  to  send  to  the  Senate.  Yours  as  ever  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  D.  N.  Heineman,  New  York  City.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton, 
December  18,  and  to  Welles,  December  20,  supra.  Under  date  of  December 
23*  1863,  John  Hay's  Diary  records: 

"I  took  to  the  Senate  today  the  nomination  of  Schofield  as  Major  General 
The  President  had  previously  spoken  to  some  of  the  Senators  about  it  He  is 
anxious  that  Schofield  shd  be  confirmed  so  as  to  arrange  this  Missouri  matter 
properly.  I  told  Sherman,  Wilson,  Harris  and  Doolittle.  Senator  Foote  also 
agreed  to  do  all  he  could  to  put  the  matter  properly  through  But  on  the 
nomination  being  read  in  executive  session,  Howard  of  Michigan  objected  to  its 
consideration  and  it  was  postponed.  Sherman  and  Doolittle  tell  me  it  will  cer- 
tainly go  through  when  it  is  regularly  taken  up. 

[84] 


DECEMBER      22,      ±863 

"Lane  came  up  to  see  the  President  about  it,  and  told  him  this.  Lane  is  very 
anxious  to  have  the  Kansas  part  of  the  plan  at  once  carried  out. 

"Morgan  says  that  Gratz  Brown  gave  to  Sumner  to  present  to  the  Senate  the 
Radical  protest  against  Schofield's  confirmation,  and  that  Stunner  presented  it 
today.  The  President  sent  for  Sumner  but  he  was  not  at  his  lodgings.  .  .  ." 

AGO,  General  Orders  No.  28,  January  22,  1864,  assigned  Rosecrans  to  com- 
mand the  Department  of  the  Missouri  replacing  Schofield  and  ordered  Schofield 
to  report  to  Grant  at  Chattanooga. 

To  Oliver  D.  Filley1 

O.  D.  Filley  Executive  Mansion, 

St.  Louis,  Mo.  Washington,  Dec.  22.  1863. 

I  have  just  looked  over  a  petition  signed  by  some  three  dozen 
citizens  of  St.  Louis,  and  three  accompanying  letters,  one  by  your- 
self, one  by  a  Mr.  Nathan  Ranney,  and  one  by  a  Mr.  John  D. 
Coalter,  the  whole  relating  to  the  Rev.  Dr.  McPheeters.  The  peti- 
tion prays,  in  the  name  of  justice  and  mercy  that  I  will  restore  Dr. 
McPheeters  to  all  his  ecclesiastical  rights. 

This  gives  no  intimation  as  to  what  ecclesiastical  rights  are  with- 
held. Your  letter  states  that  Provost  Marshal  Dick,  about  a  year 
ago,  ordered  the  arrest  of  Dr.  McPheters,  Pastor  of  the  Vine  Street 
Church,  prohibited  him  from  officiating,  and  placed  the  manage- 
ment of  the  affairs  of  the  church  out  of  the  control  of  it's  chosen 
Trustees;  and  near  the  close  you  state  that  a  certain  course  "would 
insure  his  release."  Mr.  Ranney's  letter  says  "Dr.  Saml.  S.  Mc- 
Pheeters is  enjoying  all  the  rights  of  a  civilian,  but  can  not  preach 
the  gospel!!!"  Mr.  Coalter,  in  his  letter,  asks  "Is  it  not  a  strange 
illustration  of  the  condition  of  things  that  the  question  of  who  shall 
be  allowed  to  preach  in  a  church  in  St.  Louis,  shall  be  decided  by 
the  President  of  the  United  States?" 

Now,  all  this  sounds  very  strangely;  and  withal,  a  little  as  if 
you  gentlemen  making  the  application,  do  not  understand  the  case 
alike,  one  affirming  that  the  Dr.  is  enjoying  all  the  rights  of  a 
civilian,  and  another  pointing  out  to  me  what  will  secure  his 
releasel  On  the  2nd.  day  of  January  last  I  wrote  Gen.  Curtis  in  re- 
lation to  Mr.  Dick's  order  upon  Dr.  McPheeters,  and,  as  I  suppose 
the  Dr.  is  enjoying  all  the  rights  of  a  civilian,  I  only  quote  that 
part  of  my  letter  which  relates  to  the  church.  It  is  as  follows:  "But 
I  must  add  that  the  U.S.  government  must  not,  as  by  this  order, 
undertake  to  run  the  churches.  When  an  individual,  in  a  church 
or  out  of  it,  becomes  dangerous  to  the  public  interest,  he  must  be 
checked;  but  the  churches,  as  such  must  take  care  of  themselves. 
It  will  not  do  for  the  U.S.  to  appoint  Trustees,  Supervisors,  or 
other  agents  for  the  churches."  This  letter  going  to  Gen.  Curtis, 

[85] 


DECEMBER     22,      1863 

then  in  command  there  I  supposed  of  course  it  was  obeyed  espe- 
cially as  I  heard  no  further  complaint  from  Dr.  M.  or  his  friends 
for  nearly  an  entire  year. 

I  have  never  interfered,  nor  thought  of  interfering  as  to  who 
shall  or  shall  not  preach  in  any  church;  nor  have  I  knowingly,  or 
believingly,  tolerated  any  one  else  to  so  interfere  by  my  authority. 
If  any  one  is  so  interfering,  by  color  of  my  authority,  I  would  like 
to  have  it  specifically  made  known  to  me. 

If,  after  all,  what  is  now  sought,  is  to  have  me  put  Dr.  M.  back, 
over  the  heads  of  a  majority  of  his  own  congregation,  that  too,  will 
be  declined.  I  will  not  have  control  of  any  church  on  any  side. 
Yours  Respectfully  A-  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  owned  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Thomas  McPheeters,  St.  Louis,  Missouri.  Fil- 
ley's  letter  to  Lincoln,  November  9,  1863,  as  well  as  that  of  Nathan  Rarmey  of 
the  same  date  to  Edward  Bates,  petitioned  for  restoration  of  Samuel  B.  McPheeters 
as  pastor  of  the  Pine  (not  Vine)  Street  Church  at  St.  Louis.  (DLC-RTL).  John 
D.  Coalter's  letter  to  Bates,  December  13,  1863,  asked  the  attorney  goner«Ml  to 
use  his  influence  with  the  president  to  see  that  he  "shall  actually  read  the  pe- 
tition." (Ibid.) .  See  Lincoln's  endorsement,  infra. 

Endorsement  on  Petition 
Concerning  Samuel  B.  McPheeters1 

December  22,  1863 

The  assumptions  of  this  paper,  so  far  as  I  know,  or  believe  are  en- 
tirely false.  I  have  never  deprived  Dr.  McPheters  of  any  ecclesias- 
tical right,  or  authorized,  or  excused  its'  being  done  by  any  one 
deriving  authority  from  me.  On  the  contrary,  in  regard  to  this 
very  case,  I  directed,  a  long  time  ago,  that  Dr.  McPhetors  was  to 
be  arrested,  or  remain  at  large,  upon  the  same  rule  as  any  one 
else;  and  that,  in  no  event,  was  any  one  to  interfere  by  my  author- 
ity, as  to  who  should,  or  should  not  preach  in  any  church.  This 
was  done,  I  think,  in  a  letter,  in  the  nature  of  an  order,  to  Mr. 
Dick.  The  assumption  that  I  am  keeping  Dr.  M.  from  preaching  in 
his  church  is  monstrous.  If  any  one  is  doing  this,  by  pretense  of 
my  authority,  I  will  thank  any  one  who  can,  to  make  out  and  pre- 
sent me,  a  specific  case  against  him.  If,  after  all,  the  Dr.  is  kept 
put  by  the  majority  of  his  own  parishioners,  and  my  official  power 
is  sought  to  force  him  in  over  their  heads,  I  decline  that  also. 
Dec.  22.  1863.  A.  LINCOLN 

T  uA^-DtMi~RT^'  1{incoln>8  endorsement  is  written  on  a  petition  signed  by 
John  Whitehall  and  other  members  of  the  Pine  Street  Church,  asking  restora- 
tion of  Dr.  Samuel  B  McPheeters  to  his  pulpit.  Concerning  the  removal  of 
McPheeters,  see  Lincoln  to  Curtis,  December  27,  1862,  supra. 

[86] 


To  Gilman  Marston1 

Military  Commander  at  Executive  Mansion, 

Point-Lookout,  Md.  Washington,  Dec.  22,  1863. 

If  you  have  a  prisoner  by  the  name  Hinder  —  Daniel  Linder, 
I  think,  and  certainly  the  son  of  U.  F.  Linder,  of  Illinois,  please 
send  him  to  me  by  an  officer.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  For  General  Marston's  reply  see  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  December 
26,  infra. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States.  December  22,  1863 

I  transmit  to  the  Senate,  for  its  consideration  with  a  view  to 
ratification,  two  Conventions  between  the  United  States  and  His 
Belgian  Majesty,  signed  at  Brussels  on  the  2Oth  of  May  and 
the  2oth  of  July  last,  respectively,  and  both  relating  to  the  extin- 
guishment of  the  Scheldt  Dues,  &c.  A  copy  of  so  much  of  the  cor- 
respondence between  the  Secretary  of  State  and  Mr.  Sanford,  the 
Minister  Resident  of  the  United  States  at  Brussels,  on  the  subject 
of  the  Conventions  as  is  necessary  to  a  full  understanding  of  it,  is 
also  herewith  transmitted.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  December  22nd,  1863. 


DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8B  Bi.  Both  treaties  were  ratified  on  February 
26,  1864.  The  correspondence  transmitted  is  not  filed  with  Lincoln's  message 
and  has  not  been  located. 


To  Gideon  Welles1 

[December  22,  1863] 

I  fear  that  the  publication  of  a  part  of  the  intercepted  cor- 
respondence just  now  may  do  harm,  and  I  have  to  request  you  that, 
so  far  as  in  your  power,  you  will  suppress  any  further  publication 
of  any  part  of  it,  either  here,  at  New  York  or  elsewhere,  for  a  few 
days.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Hertz,  II,  949,  misdated  1862.  A  bundle  of  letters  captured  aboard  the  Con- 
federate ship  Ceres  had  been  turned  over  by  Welles  to  his  chief  clerk  William 
Faxon,  for  publication.  Welles'  Diary  under  date  of  December  21,  records  a 
meeting  at  which  the  letters  were  read:  "When  we  met  at  eight,  Faxon  pro- 
ceeded to  read  them.  Those  from  Trowbridge  [N.  C.  Trowbridge  of  New  York] 
to  young  Lamar  [Colonel  Charles  A.  L.  Lamar,  who  had  been  a  confederate 
agent  in  England]  made  some  singular  disclosures,  and  one  of  them  made  men- 
tion of  a  nephew  of  William  H.  Seward  as  being  concerned  in  a  cargo  for  run- 
ning the  blockade.  This  disturbed  Seward  more  than  I  should  have  supposed, — 
for  it  was  not  asserted  as  a  fact, — and  if,  as  he  remarked,  there  were  among 

[87] 


DECKMBER     23,      ±863 

or  thirty  nephews  one  traitor  it  would  not  be  strange.  It  was  thought 
stoplKublication.  I  proposed  that  a  portion  .  .  .  should  be  nw.de  p«b- 
Hc  But  I  was  overruled  by  the  others,  and  Faxon  was  sent  off  to  stop  the 

publication.  He  was  too  late,  however,  for  a  portion  of  them  had  already  been 
printed.  .  .  •" 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

December  23,  1863 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives. 

I  transmit  to  Congress  a  copy  of  the  Report  to  the  Secretary  o£ 
State  of  the  Commissioners  on  the  part  of  the  United  States  tinder 
the  Convention  with  Peru  of  the  12th.  of  January  last,  on  the  sub- 
ject of  claims.  It  will  be  noticed  that  two  claims  of  Peruvian  citi- 
zens on  this  Government  have  been  allowed.  An  appropriation  for 
the  discharge  of  the  obligations  of  the  United  States  in  these  cases 
is  requested.  ABRAHAM  LIIXTCOLINT 

Washington,  23d.  December,  1863. 

IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  a8A  FS;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Original  Ex- 
ecutive Document  No.  18.  Seward's  report  may  be  found  in  Thirty-eighth  Con- 
gress, First  Session,  House  of  Representatives  Executive  Document  No.  *8.  An 
act  approved  on  June  i,  1864,  appropriated  to  Stephen  G.  Montano  $41,782.38, 
and  to  Juan  del  Carmen  Vergel  $1,170. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War.  Executive  Mansion 

My  dear  Sir:  —  Washington  Dec.  23,  1863 

Please  see  this  Lady  who  is  a  Sister  to  our  gallant  and  brave 
friend,  Gen.  Reynolds,  who  fell  at  Gettysburg.  Please  oblige  her  if 
you  can.  Yours  truly  A. 


1  Copy,  ISLA.  A  note  on  the  bottom  of  Lincoln's  letter  reads  as  follows:  "She 
applies  that  Charles  H.  Veil  gth  Penn  Reserve  orderly  to  Genl  [John  F.] 
Reynolds  may  be  appointed  2nd  Lieut  in  a  regular  regt."  Charles  H.  Veil's  ap- 
pointment as  second  lieutenant  in  the  First  U.S.  Cavalry  was  confirmed  by  the 
Senate  on  April  7,  1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir.  Washington,  Dec.  23,  1863. 

Please  see  Gen.  Schenck,  and  if  you  can,  appoint  for  him,  the 
Additional  Pay-Master  he  will  ask.  Yours  truly  A  LINCOLN- 

i  ALS,  owned  by  Horace  A.  Hayday,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania. 

[88] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Washington,  Dec.  23,  1863. 

Let  James  C.  Gates,  a  prisoner  of  War  at  Fort-Delaware,  take  the 
oath  of  allegiance  &  be  discharged.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS-F,  ISLA.  James  C.  Gates,  captured  at  Gettysburg,  was  from  Selma, 
Alabama, 

To  Whom  It  May  Concern1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Whom  it  may  concern  Washington,  Dec.  23,  1863. 

The  bearer,  William  Henry  Craft,  a  corporal  in  Co.  C.  in  the 
82nd.  N.Y.  Volunteers,  comes  to  me  voluntarily,  under  apprehen- 
sion that  he  may  be  arrested,  convicted,  and  punished  as  a  deserter; 
and  I  hereby  direct  him  to  report  forthwith  to  his  regiment  for 
duty,  and,  upon  condition  that  he  does  this,  and  faithfully  serves 
out  his  term,  or  until  he  shall  be  honorably  discharged  for  any 
cause,  he  is  fully  pardoned  for  any  supposed  desertion  heretofore 
committed.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  IHi.  On  the  inside  page  of  this  letter  is  the  following  order  from  Col- 
onel Daniel  C.  McCallum. 

"Transportation  by  rail  from  Maryland  Avenue  Depot  to  the  front- Army  of 
the  Potomac  will  be  given  to  Corporal  Wm  Henry  Craft — [in  Citizens  clothing] 

"This  paper  must  not  be  taken  up  by  the  Conductors." 

Brackets  are  in  the  source. 

To  Nathaniel  E  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Banks  Washington,  December  24.  1863. 

Yours  of  the  6th.  Inst.  has  been  received,  and  fully  considered. 
I  deeply  regret  to  have  said  or  done  anything  which  could  give  you 
pain,  or  uneasiness.  I  have  all  the  while  intended  you  to  be  master, 
as  well  in  regard  to  re-organizing  a  State  government  for  Louisiana, 
as  in  regard  to  the  military  matters  of  the  Department;  and  hence 
my  letters  on  reconstruction  have  nearly  if  not  quite  all  been  ad- 
dressed to  you.  My  error  has  been  that  it  did  not  occur  to  me  that 
Gov.  Shepley  or  any  one  else  would  set  up  a  claim  to  act  inde- 
pendently of  you;  and  hence  I  said  nothing  expressly  upon  the 
point.  Language  has  not  been  guarded  at  a  point  where  no  danger 
was  thought  of.  I  now  tell  you  that  in  every  dispute,  with  whom- 
soever, you  are  master.  Gov.  Shepley  was  appointed  to  assist  the 

[89] 


DECEMBER     24,      1863 

Commander  of  the  Department,  and  not  to  thwart  him  or  act  in- 
dependently of  him.  Instructions  have  been  given  directly  to  him, 
merely  to  spare  you  detail  labor,  and  not  to  supersede  your  au- 
thority. This,  in  it's  liability  to  be  misconstrued,  it  now  seems  was 
an  error  in  us.  But  it  is  past.  I  now  distinctly  tell  you  that  you  are 
master  of  all,  and  that  I  wish  you  to  take  the  case  as  you  find  it, 
and  give  us  a  free-state  re-organization  of  Louisiana,  in  the  short- 
est possible  time.  What  I  say  here  is  to  have  a  reasonable  construc- 
tion. I  do  not  mean  that  you  are  to  withdraw  from  Texas,  or 
abandon  any  other  military  measure  which  you  may  deem  im- 
portant. Nor  do  I  mean  that  you  are  to  throw  away  available  work 
already  done  for  re-construction;  or  that  war  is  to  be  made  upon 
Gov.  Shepley,  or  upon  any  one  else,  unless  it  be  found  that  they 
will  not  co-operate  with  you,  in  which  case,  and  in  all  cases,  you 
are  master  while  you  remain  in  command  of  the  Department. 

My  thanks  for  your  successful  and  valuable  operations  in  Texas. 
Yours  as  ever  A. 


1  ALS,  IHi.  General  Banks  wrote  on  December  6,  1863: 

"Your  letter  dated  Nov.  5th.  relating  to  the  organization  of  Government  in 
Louisiana,  I  reed,  upon  my  return  from  Texas  Dec.  2d.  Your  letter  of  the  5th. 
August,  upon  the  same  subject,  was  also  duly  received,  and  answered.  My  reply 
expressed  a  cordial  concurrence  in  your  views,  and  an  earnest  desire  to  co-op- 
erate in  their  execution.  From  the  first  I  have  regarded  reorganization  of  gov- 
ernment here  as  of  the  highest  importance,  and  I  have  never  failed  to  advocate 
every  where  the  earliest  developement  of  this  interest  by  congressional  elections 
and  by  initiatory  measures  for  state,  organization.  ...  In  the  initial  recon- 
struction, the  basis  should  be  that  of  a  free  state  beyond  the  possibility  of  fail- 
ure. Having  secured  this  other  states,  will  easily  follow.  ...  So  strong  has 
been  my  conviction  on  this  subject  that  I  requested  Governor  Boutwell  to  press 
upon  your  attention  my  views  —  when  I  returned  from  the  Teche  Country  in 
October.  ...  I  addressed  to  you  a  lengthy  letter,  and  also  wrote  to  Governor 
Shepley,  and  to  Mr.  Durant,  Attorney  General  and  other  gentlemen,  urging  the 
completion  of  this  duty  by  the  quickest  methods:  but  I  found  most  of  these  gen- 
tlemen so  interested  in  topics,  that  seemed  to  me  disconnected  with  the  general 
subject,  and  so  slightly  disposed  to  encourage  my  participation  in  the  affair  that 
I  retained  the  letter  I  had  written,  and  turned  my  attention,  not  unwillingly,  to 
matters  more  likely  to  be  accomplished,  though  not  more  important.  The  restora- 
tion of  our  Flag  in  Texas  from  Ringold  Barracks  on  the  Rio  Grande  to  the 
Brasos  on  the  coast,  rewarded  my  change  of  purpose. 

"You  will  judge  my  surprise,  leniently,  I  hope,  when  I  learned  by  your  letter 
of  the  5th.  of  Nov.  that  you  attached  responsibility  to  my  actions  in  regard  to 
the  execution  of  your  wishes.  I  assure  you  it  is  not  so  understood  here.  I  do  not 
so  understand  it.  All  the  officers  of  the  government  are  officially  informed,  that  it 
has  been  committed  by  special  instructions  from  Washington,  to  Governor  Shep- 
ley. When  the  crazy  project  of  an  unauthorized  election  in  November  was  made 
known,  upon  the  rumor  that  I  had  given  it  my  countenance  and  my  approval 
Governor  Shepley  and  Honorable  Mr  Durant  both  notified  me  by  official  letters, 
that  the  subject  of  an  election  or  state  organization  had  been  exclusive!}'  com- 
mitted to  him,  the  military  Governor.  I  so  understood  it  myself.  I  have  had 
neither  authority,  influence,  or  recognition  as  an  officer  entrusted  with  this  duty 
My  suggestions  are  respectfully,  but  silently  received  by  the  Governor  and  his 

[90] 


DECEMBER      24,      ±863 

associates.  In  that  I  supposed  they  were  right.  How  then  can  I  be  in  any  just 
sense  responsible  for  the  result?  I  beg  your  just  consideration  of  these  facts! 
Since  I  received  your  letter — the  reply  to  which  is  made  with  extreme  solicitude 
— I  have  recurred  to  my  orders  from  your  government.  .  .  .  Had  the  organiza- 
tion of  a  free  state  in  Louisiana  been  committed  to  me  under  general  instruc- 
tions only,  it  would  have  been  complete  before  this  day.  It  can  be  effected  now 
in  sixty  days — let  me  say,  even  in  thirty  days,  if  necessary.  .  .  .  But  it  should 
be  undertaken  only  by  those  who  have  authority  to  act:  who  know  what  to  do, 
who  have  no  personal  interests  in  addition  or  superior  to  the  creation  of  a 
FREE  STATE,  and  who  can  harmonize  the  action  of  individuals  without  the  sac- 
rifice of  public  interest.  I  do  not  suppose  I  have  the  qualifications  for  this  duty; 
certain  I  am  that  I  have  not  the  authority.  How  then  can  I  be  held  responsible 
for  the  failure  to  satisfy  your  expectations?.  .  ." 
See  further  Lincoln  to  Banks,  December  29,  infra. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  a  pardon  in  the  -within  case. 
Dec.  24.  1863  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  500.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  from  Representative  George  H.  Yeaman,  December  21, 
1863,  enclosing  an  application  for  pardon  of  William  Murray  Brown  of  Ken- 
tucky. 

Endorsement1 

December  24,  1863 

Comrs.  to  appraise  Negroes  in  Missouri.  These  recommendations 
were  very  urgently  pressed  by  those  M.C's  whose  names  appear. 

I  have  given  no  attention  to  the  subject;  &  did  not  even  know  of 
the  order  No.  135.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  24.  1863. 

1  AES,  owned  by  John  F.  Reed,  Upper  Darby,  Pennsylvania.  The  endorse- 
ment has  been  clipped  from  attendant  papers. 

To  Oilman  Marston1 

Military  Commander,  at  Executive  Mansion 

Point  Lookout,  Md.  Washington  D.C.  Dec.  24.  1863 

If  you  send  Linder  to  me  as  directed  a  day  or  two  ago,  also  send 
Edwin  C.  Claybrook,  of  gth.  Virginia,  rebel  cavalry. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Bates'  Diary  under  date  of  December  24,  1863,  records  concern- 
ing the  son  of  Colonel  R.  A.  Claybrook  of  Northumberland,  Virginia: 

"The  Prest,  being  abt.  to  send  for  young  Linder  of  Ills:  at  my  instance, 
ordered  up  young  Claybrook  also  ....  to  release  them,  if  they  will  only  accept 
the  boon,  or  any  reasonable  terms. 

[91] 


DECEMBER      24,      1863 

"The  Prest:  is  anxious  to  gratify  Linder,  the  father  who  is  his  old  friend; 
and  I  Ln  very  desirous  to  make  a  New  Year's  gift  of  Claybrook,  to  his  father 

and  family.  ..." 

See  Lincoln  to  Bates,  December  30,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

December  24,  1863 

If  there  is  a  vacancy  of  Lieutenant  in  the  5th  Artillery,  oblige 
Judge  Clifford  by  appointing  Samuel  Oilman,  Jr.  now  a  private  in 
that  Regiment,  to  that  vacancy  unless  you  know  some  substantial 
reason  to  the  contrary.  A.  LUNTCOLTNT. 

i  Stan.  V.  Henkels  Catalog  1494,  November  20,  1935,  No.  52.  Judge  Nathan 
Clifford  of  the  New  York  Supreme  Court  wrote  William  Whiting,  solicitor  of 
the  War  Department,  December  19,  1863,  to  call  attention  to  "y°unS  Samuel 
Gilman  Jr — of  New  York  City.  .  .  .  What  I  want  is  to  get  him  a  commis- 
sion. .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL).  Gilman  was  appointed  second  lieutenant  in  the  Fifth 
Artillery,  April  7,  1864,  and  dismissed  on  December  6,  1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Will  the  Sec.  of  War  please  re-consider  this  case,  and  oblige  Mr.  Rice 
and  the  Vice-President,  if  he  consistently  can?  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  24.  1863 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  of  Major  George 
Fuller,  Sixth  Maine  Volunteers,  November  22,  1863,  to  Brigadier  General  Seth 
Williams,  Assistant  Adjutant  General,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  requesting  that 
First  Sergeant  William  H.  Coan  be  mustered  into  service  as  second  lieutenant  of 
Company  H.  for  gallant  and  meritorious  service  and  because  of  the  shortage  of 
lieutenants.  The  accompanying  letters  of  Representative  John  H.  Rice  and  Vice- 
president  Hamlin  are  no  longer  with  Fuller's  letter.  Succeeding  endorsements 
by  Thomas  M.  Vincent  and  others  indicate  that  the  request  was  not  granted: 
"The  provisions  of  General  Orders  No.  182,  C.S.  cannot  be  departed  from." 


To  John  D.  Stiles1 

December  24,  1863 

Will  Hon.  Mr.  Stiles  please  inform  me,  of  what  crime  Becker  was 
convicted — in  what  court — when — how  long  he  has  served  under 
the  sentence — and  whether  he  has  behaved  well?       A.  LINCOLN- 
Dec.  24.  1863 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  466.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  from  John  D.  Stiles,  member  of  congress  from  Pennsyl- 
vania, December  16,  1863,  asking  pardon  for  George  S.  Becker,  convicted*  of 
passing  counterfeit  money  and  sentenced  in  Washington  to  the  penitentiary  at 
Albany,  New  York.  See  Lincoln  to  Bates,  January  5  and  25,  1864,  infra. 

[92] 


To  Bayard  Taylor1 

Hon.  Bayard  Taylor:  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Dec.  25.  1863. 

I  think  a  good  lecture  or  two  on  "Serfs,  Serfdom,  and  Emancipa- 
tion in  Russia"  would  be  both  interesting  and  valuable.  Could  not 
you  get  up  such  a  thing?  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1 ALS,  OClWHi.  Recently  returned  from  his  post  as  secretary  of  legation  at 
St.  Petersburg,  Bayard  Taylor  replied  on  December  28: 

"I  have  just  received  your  Christmas  suggestion,  and  with  all  the  more  pleas- 
ure because  I  think  quite  as  you  do  with  regard  to  the  interest  and  importance 
of  the  subject  you  propose.  I  intended,  at  first,  to  devote  a  part  of  my  present 
lecture  to  Russian  serfdom  and  its  abolishment,  but  found  that  it  would  make 
my  discourse  altogether  too  long.  I  therefore  decided  to  give,  first  of  all,  a  gen- 
eral account  of  Russia  and  the  people,  concerning  which  I  had  many  things  to 
say  which  are  not  only  new  to  our  people,  but  advantageous  for  them  to  know. 
My  own  short  experience  has  satisfied  me  that  no  country  (except,  perhaps,  our 
own)  has  been  as  misrepresented  as  Russia. 

"It  is  rather  late,  this  winter,  to  prepare  a  new  lecture,  especially  as  I  have  en- 
gaged to  deliver  that  on  'Russia  and  Her  People'  in  some  thirty  different  cities; 
but  I  fully  understand  the  interest  of  the  subject  you  propose,  and  desire  to 
present  it,  in  some  way,  to  the  public.  There  are  only  slight  resemblances  be- 
tween Russian  serfdom  and  slavery  in  the  southern  states,  although  they  rest 
on  the  same  basis — property  in  Man — but  the  complete  success  of  the  scheme 
of  emancipation  in  Russia  has  much  significance  for  this  nation  at  the  present 
time. 

"I  am  very  much  gratified  by  the  manifestation  of  your  personal  interest  in 
the  subject,  and  hope  that  I  may  be  able  to  contribute,  though  so  indirectly,  to 
the  growth  of  truer  and  more  enlightened  views  among  the  people.  .  .  ." 
(DLC-RTL). 

To  Ambrose  E.  Burnside1 

Major  General  Burnside  Executive  Mansion, 

Providence,  R.I.  Washington,  Dec.  26,  1863. 

Yours  in  relation  to  Privates  Eaton  &  Burrows,  of  the  6th.  N.H. 
is  received.  When  you  reach  here  about  New- Year,  call  on  me, 
and  we  will  fix  it  up — or  I  will  do  it  sooner  if  you  say  so. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Burnside's  communication  to  which  Lincoln  replied  has  not 
been  discovered.  The  roster  of  the  Sixth  New  Hampshire  lists  Abel  Eaton  of 
Company  C,  mustered  November  27,  1861,  and  re-enlisted  January  24,  1864; 
and  Daniel  Burrows,  Company  G,  mustered  November  28,  1861,  re-enlisted 
January  24,  1864.  See  further  Lincoln  to  Burnside,  December  29,  and  to  Boyle, 
January  5,  1864,  infra. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Let  the  Surgeon  General  be  put  upon  trial  by  a  court,  as  sug- 
gested by  the  Judge  Advocate  General.  A.  LINCOLN 
Dec.  26.  1863. 

[93] 


DECEMBER     26,      1863 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  1S3,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1430.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorseme^t  is  written  on  the  envelope  containing  the  report  of  a  military  com- 
mission ordered  July  a,  1863,  to  investigate  purchases  and  disbursements  of 
^e°n  General  WUliani  A.  Hammond.  The  court-martial  tried  Hammond  on 
changes  of  irregularities  in  letting  contracts  and  sentenced  him  to  be  dismissed 
on  August  18,  1864.  From  September  3,  1863  to  August  18,  1864,  Joseph  K. 
Barnes  was  acting  surgeon  general  during  the  investigation  and  trial  of  Ham- 
mond, and  was  appointed  to  replace  Hammond  upon  the  latter  s  dismissal.  By 
act  of  congress,  March  15,  1878,  a  re-investigation  was  ordered,  and  Hammond 
was  restored  as  a  brigadier  general  on  the  retired  list  without  pay  or  allowances, 
as  of  August  27,  1879. 

To  Usher  F.  Linder1 

Hon.  U.  F.  Linder  Executive  Mansion 

Chicago,  Ills.  Washington  DC.  Dec.  26.  1863 

Your  son  Dan.  has  just  left  me,  with  my  order  to  the  Sec.  of  War, 
to  administer  to  him  the  oath  of  allegiance,  discharge  him  &  send 
him  to  you.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  infra. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  General  Meade  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  the  Potomac  Washington,  Dec.  26,  1863. 

If  Christopher  Delker  of  the  61  st.  Penn.  Vols.  is  iinder  sentence 
of  death,  do  not  execute  him  till  further  order. 

Whenever  it  shall  be  quite  convenient  I  shall  be  glad  to  have  a 
conference  with  you  about  this  class  of  cases.  A. 


1  ALS,  owned  by  Robert  B.  Davis,  Bridgeport,  Connecticut.  Meade's  reply  to 
Lincoln's  telegram  was  received  at  10:05  P.M.:  "The  sentence  in  the  case  of 
private  Christopher  Delker  6ist.  Penna.  Vols  tried  for  desertion  was  forfeiture 
of  pay  &  two  years  service  after  expiration  of  his  original  term,  then  to  be  dis- 
honorably discharged.  I  will  try  next  week  to  get  up  to  Washn.  and  confer  with 
you  as  you  request.  I  am  quite  busy  now  with  the  re  enlistment  of  veteran 
volunteers."  (DLG-RTL).  The  roster  of  Company  B  lists  Christian  Delker  as 
returned  to  service  and  mustered  out  with  his  company  on  June  28,  1865. 

Memorandum: 

Appointment  of  Benjamin  F.  Hoffman1 

[December  26,  1863] 
Gov.  Tod  asks  a  Judgeship  for  Benj.  F.  Hoffman. 

1  A^>  ™S-  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  envelope  of  a  telegram 
from  David  Tod,  December  26,  1863,  recommending  his  private  secretary  Ben- 
jamin B.  Hoffman.  No  record  of  Hoffman's  appointment  has  been  found. 

[94] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

December  26,  1863 

Daniel  W.  Lander,  the  Daniel  Linder  named  within,  is  the  son  of 

my  friend  U.  F.  Linder,  at  Chicago,  Ills.  Please  administer  the  oath 

of  allegiance  to  him,  discharge  him,  and  send  him  to  his  father. 

Dec.  26,  1863.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  John  Heise  Catalog  No.  2464,  pp.  17-18.  According  to  the  catalog  descrip- 
tion, Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  telegram  from  Brigadier  General 
Oilman  Marston,  December  25,  1863,  as  follows:  "In  compliance  with  your  re- 
quest of  the  22nd.  inst.  received  last  evening  I  send  to  you  ...  a  prisoner  of 
war  named  Danl.  Linder,  son  of  U.  F.  Linder  of  Illinois."  Beneath  Lincoln's 
endorsement  Stanton  referred  the  matter  to  Edward  D.  Townsend  to  administer 
the  oath  and  execute  the  order. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Dec.  26.  1863. 

Shall  we  go  down  the  river  to-morrow?  And  if  so,  at  what  hour 
shall  we  leave  the  wharf?  and  which  wharf? 

Mrs.  L.  &  Tad,  perhaps  would  go.  I  am  not  at  all  urgent  about  it, 
&  would  not  have  you  incur  the  least  inconvenience  for  it.  I  merely 
mean  now  that  if  we  go,  the  details  better  be  fixed.  Yours  as  ever 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  NHi.  No  reply  has  been  located.  Lincoln's  return  from  Point  Lookout 
on  the  evening  of  December  28  was  reported  in  the  New  York  Tribune  for  De- 
cember 29:  "The  President  and  Secretary  of  War  returned  to-night  from  a  short 
visit  to  the  encampment  of  Rebel  prisoners  at  Point  Lookout.  It  is  understood 
that  they  satisfied  themselves  that  not  less  than  a  thousand,  or  about  a  tenth 
of  the  whole  number,  are  ready  to  enter  the  service  of  the  United  States." 


To  Nathaniel  P.  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion 
Major  Gen.  Banks  Washington,  Dec.  29.  1863. 

Yours  of  the  ±6th.  is  received;  and  I  send  you,  as  covering  the 
ground  of  it,  a  copy  of  my  answer  to  yours  of  the  6th.  it  being 
possible  the  original  may  not  reach  you.  I  intend  you  to  be  master 
in  every  controversy  made  with  you.  Yours  truly 

A.  Lmcousr 

1  ALS,  IHi.  This  letter  is  written  on  the  back  of  a  copy  of  Lincoln's  letter  of 
December  24,  supra,  in  John  Hay's  handwriting  signed  by  Lincoln.  On  Decem- 
ber 16  Banks  wrote  as  follows: 

"Earnest  and  continued  reflection  upon  the  subject  of  your  letter  of  the  5th. 

[95] 


DECEMBER     2  Q,      ±863 

November  induces  me  to  make  a  further  reply  than  my  answer  of  the  6th  in- 
stant contained.  It  is  apparent  that  you  do  not  view  public  affairs  in  this 
Department  precisely  as  they  are  presented  to  me  and  other  officers  representing 
your  adniinistration.  ,.  . 

"I  am  only  in  partial  command  here:  There  are  not  less  than  four  distinct 
governments  here,  claiming  and  exercising  original  and  independent  powers 
based  upon  instructions  received  directly  from  Washington,  and  recognizing  no 
other  authority  than  their  own.  ...  I  have  never  asked  increase  of  authority: 
but  as  your  letter  implies  a  responsibility  in  some  matters  which  I  did  not  un- 
derstand were  commited  to  me,  I  think  it  my  duty  to  you  personally,  and  to 
your  government  officially,  to  represent  my  position  and  the  difficulties  I  en- 
counter in  other  relations  than  those  referred  to  in  my  letter  of  the  6th.  instant 
which  relates  to  the  re-construction  of  the  state  government  in  Louisiana 
only.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Ambrose  E.  Burnside1 

Major  Gen.  Burnside  Executive  Mansion 

Providence,  R.I  Washington  D.C.  Dec.  29,  1863 

You  may  telegraph  Eaton  and  Burrows  that  these  cases  will  be 
disposed  of  according  to  your  request  when  you  come  to  Washing- 
ton. A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Burnside,  December  26,  supra.  Burnside's  tele- 
gram of  December  29  was  received  at  8  P.M.:  "The  necessary  papers  in  the 
case  of  Private  Eaton  &  Burrows  of  the  Sixth  .  .  .  New  Hampshire  can  be 
made  out  after  my  arrival  in  Washn.  Am  I  authorized  to  telegraph  to  the  Com- 
manding Officer  that  the  sentence  will  not  be  carried  into  effect?  I  feel  that  it 
is  best  to  decide  at  once  in  order  to  avoid  mistakes."  (DLC-RTL).  See  Lincoln 
to  Boyle,  January  5,  1864,  infra. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Majr.  Gen.  Meade.  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington,  Dec.  29,  1863 

I  am  appealed  to  in  behalf  of  Joseph  Richardson  of  4gth.  Penn. 
and  Moses  Chadbourne  (in  some  New-Hampshire  regt.)  said  to 
be  under  sentence  for  desertion.  As  in  other  cases  do  not  let  them 
be  executed  till  further  order.  A  LINCOLN 

1ALS-F,  ISLA.  Meade's  reply  to  Lincoln's  telegram  was  received  at  12-50 
P.M.:  "Telegram  reed.  The  execution  of  the  sentence  in  the  case  of  private 
Joseph  Richardson  Co  'A'  4gth.  Pa  Vols  has  been  suspended  till  further  orders 
and  the  proceedings  will  be  immediately  sent  to  you.  There  is  no  such  case 
before  me  as  that  of  Moses  Chadbourn  of  a  New  Hampshire  regt  as  referred  to 
by  you."  (DLC-RTL).  The  roster  of  the  Forty-ninth  Pennsylvania  lists  Rich- 
ardson  as  discharged  by  order  of  the  President—date  unknown."  The  roster  of 
the  Second  New  Hampshire  lists  Private  Moses  Chadbourn,  Company  D  as  de- 
serted on  July  7  1862,  apprehended  on  November  8,  1863,  and  discharged  at 
Fredericksburg,  Virginia,  on  October  20,  1865.  See  further  Lincoln  to  Meade 
January  3,  1864,  infra.  ' 

[96] 


Memorandum  Concerning  Joseph  J.  Stewart1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  Dec.  29,  1863. 
To-day  Mr.  Sterling,  State  Senator  for  Baltimore  City,  and  Mr. 
Silverwood,  Rep.  of  same  city,  Mr.  Newnes  Deputy  States  Atty 
for  same  city,  and  Judge  King  of  Common  Pleas  of  same  city,  call 
&  protest  against  the  removal  of  Joseph  J.  Stuart,  as  Collector  of 
2nd.  District.  The  District  includes  seven  wards  of  the  city,  &  Mr. 
Silverwood  resides  in  the  Districts,  but  the  others  do  not 

1  AD,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln's  memorandum  concerning  the  removal  of 
James  L.  Ridgely,  December  17,  supra.  Archibald  Stirling,  William  Silverwood, 
Albert  A.  Nunes,  whose  name  Lincoln  misspelled,  and  John  C.  King  were  the 
men  named  by  Lincoln. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

December  29,  1863 

Senator  Browning,  personally  knows,  and  vouches  for  the  writer  of 
this  letter.  Let  William  T.  Dazey,  named  within,  take  the  oath 
prescribed  in  the  proclamation  of  Dec.  8th.  and  be  bailed  to  his 
brother  the  writer  of  this  letter.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  29.  1863 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Mitchell  Dazey, 
Quincy,  Illinois,  to  Senator  Orville  H.  Browning,  December  22,  1863,  asking  re- 
lease of  his  brother  William  T.  Dazey  of  Mississippi,  imprisoned  at  Alton, 
Illinois. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If  the  within  request  can  be  lawfully  granted,  let  it  be  done. 
Dec.  29.  1863.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  J.  H. 
Puleston  to  John  G.  Nicolay,  "Gov.  Curtin  writes  me  anxiously  about  his 
Brother-in-law  Capt.  William  Wilson  of  whom  he  spoke  to  you  at  Gettysburgh. 
.  .  .  Wilson  is  now  detached  from  his  Regt  .  .  .  and  as  he  is  liable  at  any 
time  to  be  sent  back  to  his  Regt.  Mrs.  Curtin  is  very  desirous  to  have  him 
apptd.  A.A.G.  or  something  else  with  rank  of  Captain,  so  that  he  may  be  sure  to 
remain  with  [Winfield  S.]  Hancock  who  wants  him.  .  .  ."  No  further  appoint- 
ment for  Captain  William  P.  Wilson  of  the  One  Hundred  Forty-eighth  Penn- 
sylvania Infantry  seems  to  have  been  made  until  he  was  appointed  aide-de-camp 
with  rank  of  captain  for  the  First  Army  Corps  (Veteran)  on  January  23,  1865. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General,  December  30,  1863 

Herewith  I  send  you  Edwin  C.  Claybrook,  as  you  requested.  I 

now  place  him  at  your  control.  Yours  truly,  A. 

Dec.  30,  1863. 

[97] 


DECEMBER     3  O,      1863 

i  AES  owned  by  Frederick  M.  Dearborn,  New  York  City.  Lincoln's  endorse- 
mentt  written  o/the  back  of  a  communication  from  .Genera]  I  Gilman  Marston 
December  29,  1863:  "In  obedience  to  your  dispatch  of  the  24th  uist.  ...  I  send 
December  ^9^.3  ^  ^^  Q£  g  Va  rebel  cavalry.  Said  Claybrook  declines 


to  take  the  oath  of  allegiance.  .  .  . 

Bates'  Diary  records  under  date  of  December  30,  1863:  . 

"To  day  was  delivered  to  me,  by  written  order  of  the  President,  Edwin  C. 
Claybrook.  .  .  .  Afterwards  Jany.  5-?  I  took  his  parole,  .  .  .  and  sent  him  down 
the  Potomac  ...  he  got  home  on  the  gth.  on  which  day,  he  wrote  me  a  very 
manly  and  gentlemanly  letter.  .  .  ." 

To  Jeremiah  T.  Boyle1 

Gen.  Boyle  Executive  Mansion, 

Louisville,  Ky.  Washington,  Dec.  30,   1863. 

It  is  said  that  Corporal  Robert  L.  Crowell,  of  Co.  E.  20  Ky,  Vol. 
Infy.  is  under  sentence  to  be  shot  on  the  8th.  of  January,  at  Louis- 
ville.  Do  not  let  the  sentence  be  executed  until  further  order  from 
rne.  A.  LINCOLN 

*  ALS,  RPB.  See  further  Lincoln  to  Boyle,  January  5,  1864,  infra. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington,  D.C.  Dec.  30.  1863 

Jacob  Bowers  is  fully  pardoned  for  past  offence,  upon  condition 
that  he  returns  to  duty,  and  re-enlists  for  three  years  or  during  the 
war.  A. 


3-ALS,  RPB.  General  Butler  telegraphed  Lincoln  on  December  30:  "Jacob 
Bowers  was  sentenced  to  imprisonment  for  life  by  Genl.  Order  No.  37,  from 
these  Head  Qrs  which  sentence  was  approved  by  me  Nov.  24th.  for  desertion.  I 
now  believe  that  he  simply  acted  under  a  misapprehension  of  his  duty,  being  o 
German  not  understanding  his  duty.  Please  permit  me  to  remit  this  sentence  if 
he  returns  to  duty  and  re  enlists  during  the  war.  I  suppose  I  have  the  power 
now  to  do  so  but  the  papers  are  in  Washington.  This  is  the  first  time  I  have 
ever  asked  you  to  pardon  any  body."  (DLC-RTL). 

Additional  Instructions 
to  Direct  Tax  Commissioners1 

December  31,  1863 

^  Additional  instructions  to  the  Direct  tax  Commissioners  for  the 
District  of  South  Carolina  in  relation  to  the  disposition  of  lands: 

i.  You  will  allow  any  loyal  person  of  twenty  one  years  of  ago, 
or  upwards,  who  has  at  any  time  since  the  occupation  by  the  na- 
tional forces  resided  for  six  months,  or  now  resides  upon,  or  is 

[98] 


DECEMBER      31,       1863 

engaged  in  cultivating  any  lands  in  your  district  owned  by  the 
United  States  to  enter  the  same  for  preemption  to  the  extent  of  one, 
or  at  the  option  of  the  preemptor,  two  tracts  of  twenty  acres  each, 
paying  therefor  one  dollar  and  twenty  five  cents  per  acre.  You  will 
give  preference  in  all  cases  to  heads  of  families,  and  married 
women  whose  husbands  are  engaged  in  the  service  of  the  United 
States,  or  are  necessarily  absent. 

2  You  will  permit  each  soldier,  sailor  or  marine  actually  en- 
gaged in  the  service  of  the  United  States,  or  any  who  may  have 
been,  or  hereafter  shall  be  honorably  discharged  to  preempt  and 
purchase  in  person,  or  by  authorized  agents,  at  the  rate  of  one  dol- 
lar, twenty  five  cents  per  acre,  one  tract  of  twenty  acres  of  land, 
if  single  and,  if  married,  two  tracts  of  twenty  acres  each,  in  addi- 
tion to  the  amount,  a  head  of  family,  or  married  woman  in  the 
absence  of  her  husband,  is  allowed  to  preempt  and  purchase  under 
the  general  privilege  to  loyal  persons. 

3  Each  preemptor  on  filing  his  claim  and  receiving  a  certificate 
of  preemption  must  pay  in  United  States  notes,  two  fifths  of  the 
price,  and  the  residue  on  receiving  a  deed  for  the  parcels  of  land 
preempted,  and  a  failure  to  make  complete  payment  on  receipt  of 
the  Deed  will  forfeit  all  rights  under  the  preemption,  as  well  as  all 
partial  payments  for  the  land. 

4  When  persons  authorized  to  purchase  by  preemption  desire 
to  enter  upon,  and  cultivate  lands  not  yet  surveyed,  they  may  do 
so,  but  they  will  be  required  to  conform  in  their  selection,  as  near- 
ly as  possible,  to  the  probable  lines  of  the  surveys,  and  to  take  and 
occupy  them  subject  to  correction  of  title  and  occupation  by  actual 
surveys  when  made. 

5.  In  making  surveys,  such  reservations  for  paths  and  road- 
ways will  be  made  as  will  allow  easy  and  convenient  access  to  the 
several  subdivisions  entered  for  sale  and  occupancy  by  preemption 
or  otherwise.  Approved  December  31.  1863. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Copy,  DNA  FI  RG  58,  Direct  Tax  Commission  of  South  Carolina. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Will  Gen.  Meade  please  suspend  execution,  in  this,  case,  as  in 
others.  A.  LINCOLN 

Dec.  31.  1863. 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  NN  831.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  papers  in  the  case  of  Corporal  David  McGahan, 
Forty-ninth  Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  sentenced  for  desertion. 

[99] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Will  the  Secretary  of  War  please  have  early  attention  given  to  this 
subject?  A-  LINCOLN 

Dec.  31.  1863. 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  156,  Office  of  Chief  of  Ordnance,  N  145.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  petition  from  employees  at  the  Water  town  Arsenal 
(Massachusetts)  setting  forth  grievances,  chiefly  longer  working  hours  than 
were  in  force  at  Navy  Yards.  An  endorsement  by  General  George  D.  Ramsay, 
January  7,  1864,  instructed  that  "working  hours  now  in  force  at  the  Charles- 
town  Navy  Yard"  be  conformed  to  at  the  arsenal. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir:  Washington,  Dec.  31,  1863. 

John  Tipton,  an  acquaintance  of  mine,  in  the  county  of  my 
residence,  represents  that  he  has  lost  one  brother,  and  had  another 
crippled  for  life,  in  our  service,  and  that  he  has  a  nephew — M.  P. 
Davis, — who  was  conscripted  in  the  rebel  service  and  is  now  our 
prisoner  at  Camp  Douglas.  He  asks  that  the  nephew,  may  be  dis- 
charged on  taking  the  oath.  Let  it  be  done.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  owned  by  Mrs.  Jennie  G.  Curl,  Eureka,  California.  Brothers  of  John 
P.  Tipton  of  Springfield,  Illinois,  were:  Private  Landon  P.  Tipton,  Company  I, 
Seventh  Illinois  Volunteers,  and  Sergeant  Isaac  H.  Tipton  of  the  same  company 
who  died  at  Louisville,  Kentucky,  on  April  2,  1862.  No  further  reference  has 
been  found  to  his  nephew,  M.  P  Davis. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir:  Washington,  Dec  sist.  1863 

Please  fix  up  the  Dept.  to  which  Curtis  is  to  go  without  waiting 
to  wind  up  the  Missouri  matter.  Lane  is  very  anxious  to  have  Fort 
Smith  in  it,  and  I  am  willing  -unless  there  be  decided  Military 
reasons  the  contrary,  in  which  case  of  course  I  am  not  for  it. 

It  will  oblige  me  to  have  the  Curtis  Department  fixed  at  once 
Yours  truly,  A   LINCOLN. 

DNA  WR  RG  108,  Headquarters  of  the  Army,  Letters  Received,  No 
,  general  Orders  No.  ±,  January  i,   1864,  assigned  General  Samuel 
to    command   the    Department    of    Kansas,    consisting    of    Kansas, 
Colorado,  and  the  Indian  territories,  including  the  post  of  Fort  Smith, 

[100] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

1864 

The  Hon.  Secretary  of  War:   Please  see  and  hear  Mrs  Kennedy 
and  oblige  her  if  you  can  find  a  place  for  her  son.  1864 
1  Copy,  CSmH.  Mrs.  Kennedy  has  not  been  identified. 

To  Thomas  T.  Eckert1 

[c.  January,  1864] 
Private         Please  send  the  above.          A. 


1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  following  undated 
telegram: 

"C.  P.  Johnson,  Esq.  Jefferson  City  Mo. 

"Dont  let  the  convention  bill  be  pressed  to  a  vote  for  some  days  after  it 
comes  up.  I  will  write  you  at  length.  B.  GRATZ  BROWN" 

Charles  P  Johnson  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  was  a  member  of  the  state  legis- 
lature. The  first  ballot  on  the  bill  calling  for  an  election  to  be  held  in  Novem- 
ber, 1864,  for  election  of  delegates  to  a  constitutional  convention,  was  taken  in 
the  Missouri  legislature  on  January  14,  1864,  and  the  act  was  finally  approved 
on  February  13,  1864. 

To  James  S.  Wadsworth1 

[January,  1864?] 

You  desire  to  know,  in  the  event  of  our  complete  success  in  the 
field,  the  same  being  followed  by  a  loyal  and  cheerful  submission 
on  the  part  of  the  South,  if  universal  amnesty  should  not  be  ac- 
companied with  universal  suffrage. 

Now,  since  you  know  my  private  inclinations  as  to  what  terms 
should  be  granted  to  the  South  in  the  contingency  mentioned,  I 
will  here  add,  that  if  our  success  should  thus  be  realized,  followed 
by  such  desired  results,  I  cannot  see,  if  universal  amnesty  is 
granted,  how,  under  the  circumstances,  I  can  avoid  exacting  in 
return  universal  suffrage,  or,  at  least,  suffrage  on  the  basis  of  in- 
telligence and  military  service. 

How  to  better  the  condition  of  the  colored  race  has  long  been  a 
study  which  has  attracted  my  serious  and  careful  attention;  hence 
I  think  I  am  clear  and  decided  as  to  what  course  I  shall  pursue  in 
the  premises,  regarding  it  a  religious  duty,  as  the  nation's  guardian 
of  these  people,  who  have  so  heroically  vindicated  their  manhood 
on  the  battle-field.,  where,  in  assisting  to  save  the  life  of  the  Re- 
public, they  have  demonstrated  in  blood  their  right  to  the  ballot, 
which  is  but  the  humane  protection  of  the  flag  they  have  so  fear- 
lessly defended. 

[101] 


JANUARY      1,      1864 

The  restoration  of  the  Rebel  States  to  the  Union  must  rest  upon 
the  principle  of  civil  and  political  equality  of  both  races;  and  it 
must  be  sealed  by  general  amnesty.2 

iNew  York  Tribune,  September  26,  1865;  Scribner's  Magazine,  January, 
1893.  This  extract  was  widely  reprinted  in  newspapers  from  the  source  in- 
dicated in  the  Tribune  as  follows: 

"The  Southern  Advocate  of  the  i8th  inst.  says: 

"  4The  following  extract,  which  has  just  been  published,  is  from  the  late 
President  Lincoln's  letter  to  Gen.  Wadsworth,  who  fell  in  the  battle  of  the 
Wilderness.  The  letter,  which  is  of  a  private  character,  is  to  be  sent  to  Gen. 
Wadsworth's  family.  •••*•* 

"  4It  shows  that  Mr.  Lincoln,  who  desired  the  bestowal  of  the  elective  fran- 
chise upon  the  blacks,  was  also,  at  an  early  day,  in  favor  of  granting  universal 
amnesty,  which,  for  some  strange  and  unaccountable  reason,  is  still  withheld 
from  the  South,  notwithstanding  it  is  known  that  it  was  his  intention  to  grant, 
without  any  exception,  a  general  pardon. 

"  4His  wishes,  in  this  particular,  the  American  people  cannot  afford  to  dis- 
regard. Congress  will,  no  doubt,  exact  the  right  of  suffrage  for  the  blacks.  Why 
universal  amnesty  should  be  withheld  until  that  time,  we  are  unable  to  soe. 
This,  certainly,  was  not  Mr.  Lincoln's  plan,  whose  intentions  all  parties 
should  sacredly  observe. 

"  'The  following  is  the  extract  referred  to,  in  which  Mr.  Lincoln  says:  [ex- 
tract as  given  above] .'  " 

The  Southern  Advocate  has  not  been  located,  and  no  other  reference  has 
been  found  to  the  original  letter  to  Wadsworth.  The  contents  of  the  excerpt 
is,  however,  closely  in  keeping  with  views  expressed  by  Lincoln  elsewhere  (see 
Fragment,  August  26,  1863,  supra),  and  seems  to  be  genuine.  The  date  as- 
signed is  based  upon  the  fact  that  General  Wadsworth  returned  from  his  tour 
of  inspection  of  freedmen  in  the  Mississippi  Valley  on  December  3,  1863,  and 
on  the  supposition  that  Lincoln's  letter  would  probably  have  been  written 
some  time  thereafter,  but  in  any  case  prior  to  May,  1864,  since  Wadsworth 
was  killed  in  the  Battle  of  the  Wilderness,  May  5-7,  1864. 

2  This  paragraph  does  not  appear  in  the  newspaper  accounts,  but  is  in- 
cluded in  the  article  by  Marquis  de  Chambrun  in  Scribner's  Magazine. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Let  this  appointment  be  made,  if  the  service  can  be  made  useful. 
Jan.  i,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  City  Book  Auction  Catalog  No.  523,  April  28,  1951,  No.  A22.  According  to 
the  catalog  description,  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  five 
officers  recommending  promotion  of  David  McKinney.  First  Lieutenant  David 
McKmney,  regimental  quartermaster  of  the  Seventy-seventh  Illinois  Infantry 
was  promoted  to  captain  and  assistant  quartermaster  on  March  5,  1865. 

To  Jeremiah  C.  Sullivan1 

Gen.  Sullivan  Washington,  D.C., 

Harper's  Ferry.  Jan.  t-  3/3O  PM  ±S6^ 

Have  you  anything  new  from  Winchester,  Martinsbure;  or 
thereabouts?  A  LINCOLN 

[102] 


JANUARY      2,      ±864 

1  ALS,  RPB.  On  December  31,  1863,  General  Sullivan  had  reported  to  Gen- 
eral Benjamin  F.  Kelley  that  General  Jubal  Early  would  attack  •within  twenty- 
four  hours  (OR,  I,  XXIX,  II,  591).  His  reply  to  Lincoln's  telegram  was  re- 
ceived at  5:30  P.M.  on  January  i,  1864: 

"I  have  ordered  a  force  to  Winchester  strong  enough  to  develop  anything 
that  may  be  there.  I  believe  the  reports  from  Martinsburg  this  morning  were 
premature.  I  am  now  leaving  for  Martinsburg  to  see  for  myself."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  Gen.  Butler  Washington,  Jan.  2,  1864. 

The  Secretary  of  War  and  myself  have  concluded  to  discharge, 
of  the  prisoners  at  Point  Lookout,  the  following  classes. 

\  Those  who  will  take  the  oath  prescribed  in  the  proclamation 
of  Dec.  8.,  and,  by  the  consent  of  Gen.  Marston  will  enlist  in  our 
service. 

2.  Those  who  will  take  the  oath,  and  be  discharged,  and  whose 
homes  lie  safely  within  our  military  lines. 

I  send  by  Mr.  Hay,  this  letter,  and  a  blank  Book  &  some  other 
blanks,  the  way  of  using  which,  I  propose  for  him  to  explain 
verbally,  better  than  I  can  in  writing.  Yours  very  truly 

A. 


l  ALS-P,  ISLA.  This  letter  is  incorrectly  dated  "January  2,  1863"  by  Nicolay 
and  Hay  (VIII,  167).  Concerning  the  blanks  prepared  by  Lincoln  for  the 
oath  of  December  8,  1863,  see  the  note  to  Lincoln's  communication  to  Peirpoint, 
December  21,  1863,  supra.  Hay's  Diary  records  under  date  of  January  2,  1864, 
his  trip  to  Point  Lookout  with  the  blanks. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  examine  and  report  on  this  case. 
Jan.  2.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  has  been  clipped  from  attendant  docu- 
ments and  cannot  be  further  identified. 

To  Francis  H.  Peirpoint1 

Gov.  Pierpoint.  Executive  Mansion 

Alexandria,  Va.  Washington  D.C.  Jan.  2.   1864 

Please  call  and  see  me  to-day,  if  not  too  inconvenient. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Peirpoint's  reply,  misdated  "Jan  2  1863,"  is  as  follows: 
"Your  telegram  asking  me  to  call  on  you  to  day  is  reed.   I  returned  from 
Norfolk  on  Wednesday  morning  last  and  regret  that  I  was  so  near  sick  that 
I  have  not  been  out  of  my  room  but  once  since.  It  is  severe  cold.  The  first 
day  I  can  venture  out  I  will  call  on  you. 
"I  found  things"   (DLC-RTL). 

[103] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

January  2,  1864 

The  writer  of  this  is  a  good  man,  and  EM.  at  Chicago.  Webster, 
from  whom  he  quotes,  is  also  a  good  man,  and  the  locus  in  quo,  as 
you  know,  is  under  Gen.  Hurlbut.  I  submit  this  case  to  the  Sec.  of 


Jan.  2.  1864. 

1AES,  DLC-Stanton  Papers.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter 
from  John  L.  Scripps,  December  30,  1863,  quoting  an  extract  from  a  letter 
of  Brigadier  General  Joseph  D.  Webster  at  Memphis,  Tennessee,  saymg  that 
"corruption  is  openly  and  constantly  charged  upon  officers  in  that  Department. 
The  President  should  order  a  Court  of  Inquiry." 


To  Stephen  A.  Hurlbut1 

Major-General  Hurlbut,  Executive  Mansion, 

Memphis,  Tenn.:  Washington,  January  3,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  sentence  of  Privt.  Peter  Fingle  of  Fcmr- 
teenth  Iowa  Volunteers,  and  forward  record  of  trial  for  examin- 
ation. A. 


iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  407.  Hurlbut  replied  on  January  11,  "The  sentence 
of  Peter  Wingle  [Fingle]  fourteenth  (14)  Iowa  Infantry  has  been  recalled  & 
the  record  sent  to  Genl  Sherman  for  his  approval,  Col  Holt  having  decided 
that  I  do  not  command  our  army  in  the  field"  (DLC-RTL).  The  roster  of 
Company  G,  Fourteenth  Iowa,  lists  Peter  Fingle  as  deserted  at  Corinth,  Mis- 
sissippi, May  7,  1862.  No  further  record  has  been  found. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major-General  Meade:  Washington,  January  3,  1864. 

Suspend  the  execution  of  Prvt.  Joseph  Richardson,  Forty-ninth 
Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  who  is  sentenced  to  be  shot  to-morrow, 
and  forward  record  of  trial  for  examination.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.          JITO.  G.  NICOLAY. 


ivyr  (APPendix)»  P-  408.  See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  December  29    supra 

Meade  s  reply  was  received  at  3:10  P.M.:  "Your  dispatch  of  today  in  reference 
to  private  Joseph  Richardson,  49th  P.V.,  is  received.  In  obedience  to  orders 
reed,  from  you  the  execution  of  the  sentence  in  this  case  was  suspended  on 
mT2r  T^r  N  T'  ?  5  reC,°rd  Was  forwarded  for  your  orders  on  the  3oth.  ult." 
Tni  ?/'^Coa£  dso?!  *e*tence  was  commuted  to  imprisonment  in  Dry 
Tortugas  by  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  ±66,  May  3,  1864. 

[104] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General,  please  make  out  a  pardon  in  this  case. 

Jan.  4.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  L.  M.  Bentley, 
Clarksville,  Tennessee,  December  21,  1863,  asking  pardon  for  having  served 
briefly  in  1862  as  postmaster  at  Lawrenceburg  under  Confederate  appoint- 
ment. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  a  pardon  in  the  case  which 
Hon.  Mr.  Grider  will  request.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  4.  1864. 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  504.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  an  envelope  filed  with  the  papers  of  Josiah  Pillsbury  of  Kentucky, 
convicted  of  treason. 


Recommendation1 

I  personally  know  nothing  of  this  Lady;  and  yet  I  shall  be  very 
glad  if  she  can  get  some  suitable  employment.          A.  LINCOLN 
Jan.  4.  1864. 

i  ADS,  IHi. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  examine  &  report  upon  this  case. 
Jan.  5,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  466.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  the  papers  in  the  case  of  George  S.  Becker.  See  Lincoln  to  Stiles, 
December  24,  1863,  supra,  and  to  Bates,  January  25,  infra. 


To  Henry  T.  Blow1 

Executive  Mansion     Washington, 
My  Dear  Mr  Blow  5  January,  1 864. 

I  have  received  the  photograph  of  Mr.  Schaerpp's  picture  which 
you  have  had  the  kindness  to  deliver,  and  I  beg  that  you  will  ex- 
press to  the  artist  my  thanks  for  his  courtesy  I  am  yours  very  truly 

Hon.  H.  T.  Blow.  A.  LINCOLN. 

[105] 


JANUARY     5,      1864 

i  Copy  ISLA.  The  present  location  of  the  original  letter  is  not  known,  and  the 
only  available  transcript  seems  to  be  in  error  as  to  the  artist's  name.  John  W. 
Schaerff  was  an  artist  and  lithographer  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri.  Henry  T.  Blow 
as  president  of  the  Western  Academy  of  Art  probably  sent  Lincoln  an  example 
of  Schaerff'  s  work,  possibly  a  lithograph  of  Lincoln,  but  the  picture  has  not  been 
identified. 

To  Jeremiah  T.  Boyle1 

General  Boyle  Executive  Mansion 

Camp-Nelson,  Ky  Washington  D.C.  Jan.  5.  1864 

Execution  in  the  cases  of  Burrows  and  Eaton,  is  suspended,  as 
stated  by  Gen.  Burnside.  Let  this  be  taken  as  an  order  to  that 
effect.  I  do  not  remember  receiving  any  appeal  in  behalf  of  God- 
dard,  Crowell,  Puckett,  or  Smith,  and  yet  I  may  have  sent  a  des- 
patch in  regard  to  some  of  them  A. 


*ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Burnside,  December  26  and  29,  1863,  supra, 
and  to  Boyle,  January  6,  infra.  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  *£,  January  12,  1864, 
commuted  sentences  of  Daniel  Burrows,  Company  D,  and  Abel  Eaton,  Com- 
pany C,  Sixth  New  Hampshire  Volunteers,  to  hard  labor  for  the  balance  of 
their  term  of  enlistment,  but  remitted  this  sentence  and  returned  them  to  duty 
"upon  condition  they  re-enlist  in  their  regiment."  The  same  order  remitted  sen- 
tence of  Corporal  Robert  L.  Crowell,  Twentieth  Kentucky  Volunteers  and  re- 
turned him  to  duty.  See  Lincoln  to  Boyle  concerning  Crowell,  December  30, 
1863,  supra. 


To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A  Lincoln  —  Continental  Hotel.  Washington,  B.C., 

Philadelphia,  Pa.  Jany.  5.   1864 

All  very  well.         A  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  IHi.  "Continental  Hotel"  is  not  in  Lincoln's  handwriting. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Meade  Washington,  Jan.  5,  1864 

If  not  inconsistent  with  the  service,  please  allow  Gen.  William 
Harrow  as  long  a  leave  of  absence  as  the  rules  permit,  with  the 
understanding  that  I  may  lengthen  it,  if  I  see  fit.  He  is  an  ac- 
quaintance and  friend  of  mine,  &  his  family  matters,  very  urgent- 
ly require  his  presence.  A. 


iCopy   DNA  WR  RG  94,  Adjutant  General,  Letters  Received    P  ,    See  Lin 
coin's  endorsement  to  Stanton,  January  7,  infra. 

[106] 


To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

Gentlemen  of  the  Senate,  and  January  5,  1864 

House  of  Representatives. 

By  a  Joint  Resolution  of  your  Honorable  bodies,  approved  De- 
cember 23.  1863.  the  paying  of  bounties  to  veteran  volunteers,  as 
now  practiced  by  the  War  Department,  is,  to  the  extent  of  three 
hundred  dollars  in  each  case,  prohibited  after  this  fifth  day  of  the 
present  month.  I  transmit,  for  your  consideration,  a  communica- 
tion from  the  Secretary  of  War,  accompanied  by  one  from  the 
Provost-Marshal-General  to  him,  both  relating  to  the  subject 
above  mentioned.  I  earnestly  recommend  that  the  law  be  so  modi- 
fied as  to  allow  bounties  to  be  paid  as  they  now  are,  at  least  until 
the  ensuing  first  day  of  February. 

I  am  not  without  anxiety  lest  I  appear  to  be  importunate,  in 
thus  re-calling  your  attention  to  a  subject  upon  which  you  have 
so  recently  acted;  and  nothing  but  a  deep  conviction  that  the  pub- 
lic interest  demands  it,  could  induce  me  to  incur  the  hazard  of 
being  misunderstood  on  this  point.  The  executive  approval  was 
given  by  me  to  the  Resolution  mentioned;  and  it  is  now,  by  a 
closer  attention,  and  a  fuller  knowledge  of  facts,  that  I  feel  con- 
strained to  recommend  a  re-consideration  of  the  subject. 

January  5.  1864.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

lADf,  DLC-RTL;  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  F4;  DS,  DNA  RG  233, 
House  Executive  Document.  The  letter  o£  James  B.  Fry  to  Stanton,  January  2, 
1864,  is  as  follows: 

"After  great  labor  the  volunteer  recruiting  service  under  the  President's  call 
of  October  17th  is  fairly  in  progress.  Letters  all  dated  between  the  2oth  &  24th 
of  December  from  the  Superintendents  of  Recruiting  Service  in  Sixteen  states 
are  in  the  main  very  encouraging  as  to  the  prospect  of  getting  a  large  number 
of  recruits  by  volunteer  enlistments.  Several  of  the  states  were  in  a  fair  way 
to  raise  the  quotas  assigned  them.  The  Act  approved  December  23d.  1863,  for- 
bidding after  January  5th  the  payment  to  volunteers  of  all  bounties  except 
$100  authorized  by  the  Act  of  1861  was  not  known  at  the  time  these  favorable 
reports  were  made  to  me.  I  have  no  doubt  the  effect  of  that  act  will  be  to 
check  if  it  does  not  stop  enlistments.  Of  the  $100  bounty  provided  by  Act  of 
1861  but  $25  can  be  paid  in  advance,  $75  being  due  only  after  two  years  serv- 
ice. 

"It  took  some  time  after  October  i/th  to  get  the  people  aroused  to  the  subject 
of  volunteering;  they  are  now  in  most  states  earnestly  engaged  in  it,  &  I  have 
reports  for  October,  November  &  part  of  December  showing  that  42,529  men 
have  been  enlisted,  &  the  daily  average  of  enlistments  is  increasing.  Under 
these  circumstances  I  respectfully  suggest  the  propriety  of  a  reconsideration  of 
the  Act  forbidding  bounties  after  January  5th.  I  enclose  herewith  copy  of  my 
report  to  you  of  the  25th  December.  .  .  ." 

Stanton's  letter  of  January  5,   1864,  is  as  follows: 

"I  beg  to  submit  to  3rour  consideration  the  accompanying  letter  of  the  Pro- 
vost Marshal  General.  .  .  .  No  one  seems  to  doubt  the  necessity  of  increasing 
the  military  force  .  .  .  and,  although  much  difference  of  opinion  exists  in  re- 

[107] 


JANUARY     5,      1864 

spect  to  the  merits  of  the  system  of  raising  troops  by  volunteers  and  *e  pay- 
ment of  bounties,  and  the  system  of  raising  an  adequate  force  by  draft,  yet  two 


rsa  may  be  the  weight  of  argument  or  the  influence  of 

individual  opinion,  a  large  portion  of  the  people  .  .  .  prefer  the  method  of 
contributing  their  proportion  of  the  military  force  by  bounty  to  volunteers 
rather  than  by  draft.  . 

"Second— that  veteran  soldiers  who  have  become  inured  to  service,  even 
when  paid  bounty,  constitute  a  cheaper  force  than  raw  recruits  or  drafted  men 
without  bounty.  .  ,  , 

"The  information  received  by  this  Department  from  the  armies  in  the  iielci, 
prior  to  the  passage  of  the  resolution  .  .  .  indicated  that  a  very  large  propor- 
tion of  the  forces  now  in  service  would  have  cheerfully  re-enlisted  for  three 
years  under  the  terms  authorized  by  the  order  of  this  Department,  and  that 
such  enlistments  have  been  checked,  and  will  in  great  measure  be  put  an  end 
to,  by  the  restriction  imposed  by  the  act  of  Congress.  It  is  believed  that  if  any 
limitation  should  be  imposed  upon  the  payment  of  bounties  to  encourage  the 
enlistment  of  the  veteran  forces  now  in  the  field,  it  ought  not  to  be  sooner 
than  the  ist  of  February-  It  is  respectfully  submitted  to  your  consideration, 
therefore,  whether  the  attention  of  Congress  might  not  again  well  be  called 
to  the  subject,  so  that  the  resolution  may  be  reconsidered." 

A  joint  resolution  approved  January  13,  1864,  extended  the  payment  of 
bounties  until  March  i,  and  the  joint  resolution  approved  March  3,  provided 
further  extension  to  April  i,  1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton  and  Henry  W.  Halleck1 

January  5,   1864. 

I  ask  the  respectful  attention  and  consideration  of  the  Secretary 
of  War  and  General-in-Chief.  A,  Liisrcoi.isr. 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  108,  H.Q.A.,  S  256,  Box  70.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on  a 
resolution  of  the  Kentucky  General  Assembly,  December  14,  1863,  asking  the 
president  to  convene  a  court  of  inquiry  on  the  conduct  of  General  Thomas  I,. 
Crittenden  at  the  Battle  of  Chickamauga.  (See  OR,  I,  XXX,  619.)  Stanton 
endorsed  to  Halleck  with  directions  "to  detail  a  Court  of  Inquiry  as  speedily  as 
possible."  The  court,  convened  at  Nashville  on  January  29  and  dismissed  on 
February  23,  1864,  found  Crittenden  not  censurable. 

To  Frederick  Steele1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Steele  Washington,  January  5,  1864. 

I  wish  to  afford  the  people  of  Arkansas  an  opportunity  of  tak- 
ing the  oath  prescribed  in  the  proclamation  of  Dec.  8,  1863,  pre- 
paratory to  re-organizing  a  State-government  there. 

Accordingly  I  send  you,  by  Gen.  Kimball,  some  blank-books 
and  other  blanks,  the  manner  of  using  which  will,  in  the  main, 
be  suggested  by  an  inspection  of  them;  and  Gen.  Kimball  will  add 
some  verbal  explanations.  Please  make  a  trial  of  the  matter  im- 
mediately at  such  points  as  you  may  think  likely  to  give  success. 

[108] 


JANUARY      69      1864 

I  suppose  Helena  and  Little  Rock  are  two  of  them.  Detail  any 
officer  you  may  see  fit  to  take  charge  of  the  subject  at  each  point; 
and  which  officer,  it  may  be  assumed,  will  have  authority  to  ad- 
minister the  oath.  These  books  of  course,  are  intended  to  be  per- 
manent records.  Report  to  me  on  the  subject.  Yours  very  truly, 

A.  LINCOLN 

i  ADfS,  DLC-RTL;  LS,  owned  by  William  W.  Steele,  Pescadero,  California. 
Concerning  the  blank  books  carried  by  Brigadier  General  Nathan  Kimball,  see 
the  note  to  Lincoln's  letter  to  Peirpoint,  December  21,  1863,  supra. 

To  Jeremiah  T.  Boyle1 

Gen.  Boyle.  Executive  Mansion 

Camp  Nelson,  Ky.  Washington  D.C.  Jan.  6.  1864 

Let  executions  in  the  cases  of  Goddard,  Crowell,  Puckett  & 
Smith,  mentioned  by  you  be  suspended  till  further  order. 

A 


1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Boyle,  January  5,  supra.  Boyle's  telegram  has 
not  been  discovered. 


To  Thomas  E.  Bramlette1 

Gov.  Bramlette  Executive  Mansion, 

Frankfort,  Ky.  Washington,  Jan—  6.  1864. 

Yours  of  yesterday  received.  Nothing  is  known  here  about  Gen. 
Foster's  order,  of  which  you  complain,  beyond  the  fair  presump- 
tion that  it  comes  from  Gen.  Grant,  and  that  it  has  an  object  which 
if  you  understood,  you  would  be  loth  to  frustrate2 

True,  these  troops  are,  in  strict  law,  only  to  be  removed  by  my 
order;  but  Gen.  Grant's  judgment  would  be  the  highest  incentive 
to  me  to  make  such  order.  Nor  can  I  understand  how  doing  so  is 
bad  faith  or  dishonor;  nor  yet  how  it  exposes  Kentucky  to  ruin. 

Military  men  here  do  not  perceive  how'  it  such  \_sic~]  exposes  Ken- 
tucky, and  I  am  sure  Grant  would  not  permit  it,  if  it  so  appeared 
to  him.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  Governor  Bramlette's  telegram  of  January  5  is  as  follows:  "Maj 
Gen    [John  G.]    Foster  has   ordered   all   the  organized   forces   in  Kentucky  to 
Knoxville.  This  will  take  the  forces  raised  under  act  of  Congress  for  defense 
of  Kentucky  &  expose  us  to  Ruin     The  Act  reserved  to  you  at  once  the  power 
to  remove  these  troops     It  is  due  to  us,  to  good  faith,  to  honor  &  to  humanity 
that  this  order  as  to  these  troops  be  countermanded"   (DLC-RTL).  For  Bram- 
lette's reply  of  January  8,  see  Lincoln  to  Bramlette,  January  17,  infra. 

2  Grant's  command  of  the  Military  Division  of  the  Mississippi  included  the 
Department  of  the  Ohio,  in  which  John  G.  Foster  had  succeeded  Burnside. 

[109] 


To  Luiz  I1 

January  6,  1864 
Abraham  Lincoln 
President  of  the  United  States  of  America. 

To  His  Majesty  Dom  Luis  I. 
"  King  of  Portugal. 

Great  &  Good  Friend,  I  have  received  the  letter  which  your 
majesty  was  pleased  to  address  to  me  on  the  22  day  of  October 
last,  imparting  intelligence  of  the  birth  on  the  28th  of  the  pre- 
ceding month  of  a  Prince,  who  had  received  in  baptism  the  names 
of  Carlos  Fernando. 

Your  majesty  does  no  more  than  justice  to  the  friendly  feelings 
of  the  United  States,  in  believing  that  they  participate  with  Your 
Majesty  and  your  Royal  Family  in  the  joy  consequent  upon  this 
event;  and  I  beg  your  Majesty  to  accept  my  sincere  congratula- 
tions 

I  pray  God  to  have  Your  Majesty  and  Family  in  His  holy  keep- 
ing Your  Good  Friend  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Washington,  Jan  6  1864. 

By  the  President 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD    Secretary  of  State. 

iCopy,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Communications  to  Foreign  Sovereigns  and  States, 
III,  223. 


Memorandum: 
Appointment  of  David  D.  Johnson1 

[c.  January  6,  1864] 
I  think  I  will  make  this  appointment. 

i-AE,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Henry 
C.  Johnson,  speaker  of  the  Pennsylvania  legislature,  to  U.S.  Representative 
Amos  Myers,  January  6,  1864,  requesting  appointment  of  his  son  David  D 
Johnson  to  West  Point.  Entering  the  academy  in  July,  1864,  David  D.  Johnson 
graduated  in  1868. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  a  pardon  in  this  case. 
Jan.  7.  1864.  A   LINCOLN 

1AES,  OClWHi-Palmer  Collection.  This  endorsement  has  heen   removed 
from  attendant  papers  and  cannot  be  identified. 

[110] 


To  Christian  IX1 

January  7,  1864 
Abraham  Lincoln 
President  of  the  United  States  of  America 

To  His  Majesty  Christian  IX. 
King  of  Denmark 

Great  and  Good  Friend  I  have  reed,  the  letter  which  Your 
Majesty  was  pleased  to  address  to  me  on  the  17th  day  of  Nov  last, 
communicating  intelligence  of  the  demise  on  the  15th  of  that 
month  of  His  late  Majesty  Frederick  VII,  and  of  your  accession  to 
the  throne  of  the  Kingdom. 

Assuring  you  of  my  deep  sympathy  at  the  death  of  your  august 
Cousin,  who  like  his  predecessors  was  the  constant  &  steady  friend 
of  the  U.  States,  I  beg  leave  to  offer  to  Your  Majesty  my  sincere 
and  hearty  congratulations  upon  your  accession  to  the  throne, 
with  my  best  wishes,  that  your  reign  may  be  happy  and  glorious 
to  yourself,  and  prosperous  to  your  realm.  Permit  me  also  to  as- 
sure Your  Majesty  of  my  constant  and  earnest  desire  to  maintain 
the  amity  and  good  correspondence  which  has  always  subsisted 
and  still  prevails  between  the  two  nations  and  that  nothing  shall 
ever  be  omitted  on  my  part  to  cultivate  and  promote  maintain?2 
towards  Your  Majesty  the  friendly  relations  always,  entertained 
&  cherished  by  this  Government  in  its  relations  with  his  late  Maj- 
esty and  so  I  recommend  your  Majesty  to  the  protection  of  the 
Almighty.  Your  Good  Friend  ABRAHAM  LiisrcoLN 

Washington  City  Jan  7  1864. 
By  the  President 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD,  Secretary  of  State. 

1  Copy,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Communications  to  Foreign  Sovereigns  and  States, 
III,  232-33. 

2  "Maintain?"  is  written  above  "promote,"  but  "promote"  is  not  deleted. 


Endorsement  Concerning  Henry  Andrews1 

[January  7,  1864] 

The  case  of  Andrews  is  really  a  very  bad  one,  as  appears  by  the 
record  already  before  me.  Yet  before  receiving  this  I  had  ordered 
his  punishment  commuted  to  imprisonment  for  during  the  war  at 
hard  labor,  and  had  so  telegraphed.  I  did  this,  not  on  any  merit 
in  the  case,  but  because  I  am  trying  to  evade  the  butchering 
business  lately.  A.  LINCOLN. 

[HI] 


JANUARY      7,      1864 

i  NH  IX  27Q  As  given  in  the  source  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a 
communication  to  Salmon  E  Chase,  January  7,  1864:  "One  Andrews  is  to  be 
shot  for  desertion  at  Covington,  to-morrow.  The  proceedings  have  never  been 
submitted  to  the  President.  Is  this  right?  Governor  Hoadley."  The  source  is 
obviously  in  error  in  having  Chase's  law  partner  George  Hoadly  sign  himself 
as  "Governor  Hoadley"  when  he  was  not  elected  governor  of  Ohio  until  many 
years  later.  See  Lincoln  to  Hawley,  infra. 

To  Chauncey  G.  Hawley1 

Officer  in  command  at  Executive  Mansion 

Covington,  Ky.  Washington,  D.C.      Jan.  7.  1864 

The  death  sentence  of  Henry  Andrews  is  commuted  to  im- 
prisonment at  hard  labor  during  the  remainder  of  the  war. 

A.    LlTNTCOL/N 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln's  endorsement  on  the  telegram  from  Hoadly,  supra. 
AGO  Special  Orders  No.  11,  January  8,  1864,  commuted  the  sentence  of  Private 
Henry  Andrews,  Company  I,  One  Hundred  Twenty-fourth  Ohio  Volunteers,  to 
imprisonment  at  hard  labor  during  the  remainder  of  the  war. 

To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A.  Lincoln  Executive  Mansion, 

Philadelphia,  Pa.  -  Washington,  Jan.  7,  1864. 

We  are  all  well,  and  have  not  been  otherwise. 

A.  LIINCOLIST 

1ALS,  IHi. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  January  [7],  1864 

I  herewith  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action 
thereon,  the  following  described  treaties,  viz: 

A  treaty  made  at  Fort  Bridger,  Utah  Territory,  on  the  20!  day 
of  July,  1863,  between  the  United  States  and  the  chiefs,  principal 
men,  and  warriors  of  the  eastern  bands  of  the  Shoshonee  Nation 
of  Indians. 

A  treaty  made  at  Box  Elder,  Utah  Territory,  on  the  aoth  day 
of  July,  1863,  between  the  United  States  and  the  chiefs  and  war- 
riors of  the  northwestern  bands  of  the  Shoshonee  Nation  of  Indi- 
ans. 

A  treaty  made  at  Ruby  Valley,  Nevada  Territory,  on  the  ist 
day  of  October,  1863,  between  the  United  States  and  the  chiefs, 
principal  men,  and  warriors  of  the  [western  bands  of  the] 
Shoshonee  Nation  of  Indians. 

[112] 


JANUARY      7,      1864 

A  treaty  made  at  Tuilla  Valley,  Utah  Territory,  on  the  12th 
day  of  October,  1863,  between  the  United  States  and  the  chiefs, 
principal  men,  and  warriors  of  the  Goship  bands  of  Shoshonee  In- 
dians. 

A  treaty  made  at  Soda  Springs,  in  Idaho  Territory,  on  the  14th 
day  of  October,  1863,  between  the  United  States  and  the  chiefs  of 
the  mixed  bands  of  Bannacks  and  Shoshonees,  occupying  the  val- 
ley of  the  Shoshonee  River. 

A  letter  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  of  the  5th  instant,  a 
copy  of  a  report  of  the  3Oth  ultimo,  from  the  Commissioner  of  In- 
dian Affairs,  a  copy  of  a  communication  from  Governor  Doty, 
superintendent  of  Indian  affairs,  Utah  Territory,  dated  November 
10,  1863,  relating  to  the  Indians,  parties  to  the  several  treaties 
herein  named,  and  a  map  furnished  by  that  gentleman  are  here- 
with transmitted.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN*. 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  January,  1864. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  323.  The  treaties  were  submitted  to  the  Senate  on 
January  7  and  ratified  on  March  7,  1864.  The  treaty  of  October  i,  1863,  with 
the  western  bands  was  reconsidered,  however,  and  was  not  finally  ratified  until 
June  26,  1866. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

January  7,  1864 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives: 

I  transmit  to  Congress  a  copy  of  the  Decree  of  the  Court  of  the 
United  States  for  the  Southern  District  of  New  York,  awarding 
the  sum  of  seventeen  thousand  one  hundred  and  fifty  dollars  and 
sixty-six  cents  for  the  illegal  capture  of  the  British  schooner 
"Glen";  and  request  that  an  appropriation  of  that  amount  may  be 
made  as  an  indemnification  to  the  parties  interested. 

Washington,  /th.  January,  1864.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  19.  An  act  approved 
on  February  13,  1864,  appropriated  $17,150.66  to  owners  of  the  schooner  Glen. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Will  the  Secretary  of  War  please  order  Gen.  Harrow  to  report  to 
Gen.  Grant.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  7,  1864. 

1  AES,  owned  by  Gordon  A.  Block,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.  See  Lincoln 
to  Stanton,  November  11,  1863,  and  to  Meade,  January  5,  1864,  supra.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  the  back  of  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  522  (Extract), 
November  24,  1863,  assigning  Brigadier  General  William  Harrow  to  report  to 
Major  General  Meade.  Below  Lincoln's  endorsement  Stanton  wrote  "Adjt  Genl 

[113] 


endorsement  is  "Letter  to  Genl  [Francis  J.]  Herron,  Jany. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If   the   request   of    Governor   Buckingham    and    Senator    Foster, 
within,  can  consistently  be  granted,  let  it  be  done. 

Jany.  7.  1864.  A-  LINCOLN 

i  AES,  owned  by  C.  Norton  Owen,  Glencoe,  Illinois.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  of  December  29,  1863,  signed  by  William  A.  Bucking- 
ham and  endorsed  by  Lafayette  S.  .Foster,  January  7,  1864,  recommending 
Major  Hiram  B.  Crosby  of  the  Twenty-first  Connecticut  Volunteers  for  ap- 
pointment as  assistant  adjutant  general  of  an  army  corps.  Stanton  endorsed 
as  follows:  "By  the  regulations  of  the  Service  the  Staff  officers  of  Corps  Com- 
manders are  nominated  by  the  Commander  &  if  there  be  no  objection  to  the 
individual  it  is  approved  by  the  Dept." 

To  Crafts  J.  Wright  and  Charles  K.  Hawkes1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Gentlemen:  Washington,  Jany.  7,   1864. 

You  have  presented  me  a  plan  for  getting  cotten  and  other  prod- 
ucts, from  within  the  rebel  lines,  from  which  you  think  the 
United  States  will  derive  some  advantage. 

Please  carefully  and  considerately,  answer  me  the  following 
questions. 

1.  If  now,  without  any  new  order  or  rule,  a  rebel  should  come 
into  our  lines  with  cotten,  and  offer  to  take  the  oath  of  Dec.  8th. 
what  do  you  understand  would  be  done  with  him  and  his  cotten? 

2.  How  will  the  physical  difficulty,  and  danger,  of  getting  cotten 
from  within  the  rebel  lines  be  lessened  by  your  plan?  or  how  will 
the  owners  motive  to  surmount  that   difficulty   and   danger,    be 
heightened  by  it? 

3.  If  your  plan  be  adopted,  where  do  you  propose  putting  the 
cotten  &c.  into  market?  how  assure  the  government  of  your  good 
faith  in  the  business?  and  how  be  compensated  for  your  services? 
Very  Respectfully  A.  LINCOLN 

Messrs.  Crafts  J.  Wright  &  C.  K.  Hawkes. 

*ALS,  IHi;  LS  copy,  DLC-RTL.  On  January  4,  1864,  Hawkes  and  Wright 
wrote  Lincoln; 

"We  have  the  honor  to  refer  you  to  the  application  of  the  Hon  B  F  Flanders 
special  Agt  of  the  Treasury  Dept.,  Mr.  Geo  S.  Denison  Collector  of  Customs- 
Mr  Wm.  H.  Higgins  Assessor  of  U.S.  Internal  Revenue,  the  Hon  B  Rush 
Plumby  Hon  Jno  Hutchins— and  also  that  of  Maj  Gen  Banks  commanding 
the  department  of  the  Gulf  and  His  Excellency  Gov  Shepley.  This  application 
is  for  a  special  permit  to  obtain  supplies  on  terms  &  conditions  designated. 

[114] 


JANUARY      7,      1864 

We  may  also  add  that  very  many  worthy  union  people  on  each  side  are  look- 
ing to  the  granting  of  this  as  the  only  hope  of  relieving  them  from  want. 

"We  may  briefly  say  the  request  is  that  you,  with  whom  the  power  is  placed, 
will  grant  to  Geo.  B.  Waldron — Crafts  J.  Wright  &  Charles  K  Hawks  a  permit. 

"ist.  To  recieve  from  persons  beyond  the  lines  of  our  actual  military  occu- 
pation— such  cotton — sugar — other  stores  as  parties  beyond  our  lines  may  de- 
sire to  consign  to  us,  to  be  conveyed  &  sold  within  our  lines  on  the  terms  & 
according  to  the  rules  of  the  Treasury  Department. 

"2d.  That  the  proceeds  of  sales,  less  the  government  dues  &  current  expenses, 
shall  be  invested  in  the  securities  of  the  Government. 

"3d.  That  such  an  amount  of  said  securities  purchased  as  aforesaid  shall  be 
deposited  with  some  officer  of  the  Treasury  Department,  until  the  consignee 
shall  prove  his  loyalty  by  taking  the  oath  according  to  the  recent  proclama- 
tion. .  .  . 

"On  recommendation  of  Gen  Banks — Gen  Shepley — &  others  we  have  come 
from  New  Orleans  to  the  city  to  answer  any  questions  as  well  as  to  satisfy  you 
of  our  loyalty.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

Enclosed  with  their  letter  was  the  following  document,  signed  by  John 
Hutchins,  George  S.  Denison,  William  H.  Higgins  and  B.  Rush  Plumly,  ap- 
proved by  Benjamin  F.  Flanders,  "provided  the  holders  of  the  Bonds  shall  de- 
posit fifty  per  centum  thereof  with  the  Treasurer  of  the  United  States  until 
the  close  of  the  war:" 

"The  undersigned  are  advised  that  a  large  number  of  persons  are  within  the 
Rebel  lines  who  have  cotton — sugar  and  other  stores — which  they  have  been 
and  are  concealing  from  the  Rebel  authorities  as  confiscable  property.  That 
these  parties  are  anxious  to  place  these  supplies  within  the  United  States  Mili- 
tary lines — not  only  as  a  place  of  safety,  but  to  secure  for  their  families  a 
means  of  support  and  a  means  of  satisfying  their  debts  to  Loyal  Union  citizens. 
Many  of  these  parties  desire  to  leave  the  so-called  Confederacy  so  soon  as  they 
can  place  their  property  on  which  they  depend — on  a  place  of  safety. 

"They  do  not  ask  to  have  the  proceeds  of  their  property  returned  in  sup- 
plies— but  are  willing  to  invest  the  net  proceeds — less  the  current  .Govern- 
ment dues  and  the  expenses  attending  the  getting  to  market  and  selling — in 
United  States  Bonds. 

"They  have  designated  George  B.  Waldron  of  New  York — Crafts  J.  Wright 
of  Cincinnati  and  Charles  K.  Hawkes  of  New  York  as  Loyal  Union  citizens  to 
whom  they  will  consign  their  property  and  who  shall  invest  the  proceeds  as 
above — and  in  whom  they  and  the  Government  can  confide.  .  .  . 

""We  therefore  urgently  recommend  that  the  authority  be  given  to  the  above 
named  ...  to  receive  from  within  the  Rebel  lines  at  such  points  as  may  be 
designated — such  cotton  sugar,  and  other  stores,  as  it  may  be  desired  to  convey 
within  the  United  States  Military  lines  for  sale — and  to  invest  the  proceeds — 
less  the  expenses — in  Government  securities,  that  protection  be  afforded  by  the 
military  and  naval  authorities — unless  there  be  imperative  military  objections 
at  the  time."  (Ibid.). 

On  January  8,  Wright  and  Hawkes  replied  to  Lincoln's  questions: 

"Before  proceeding  to  reply  specifically  to  the  several  questions  which  you 
have  put  to  us,  we  deem  it  proper,  to  a  better  understanding  of  the  difficulties 
now  in  the  way  of  the  increase  of  Union  people  &  the  protection  of  Union 
property,  to  make,  with  your  permission,  a  preliminary  observation  state- 
ment. .  .  . 
[Question  i:] 

"ist.  If  he  has  not  previously  bribed  the  pickets,  they  would  siese  and  con- 
fiscate it.  ... 

**2d.  Not  having  a  permit  previously  obtained  it  would  be,  by  officers  of  the 
Treasury  Dept,  at  once  seised  &  confiscated.  .  .  . 

"3d.  The  Rebel  would  be  seperated  from  his  property — arrested — &  confined, 

[115] 


JANUARY     8,      1864 
until  he  took  the  oath  and  satisfied  tiba  officer  ...  to  'keep  and  maintain'  said 

°a"4th.  Admitting  that  after  detention  ...  he  takes  the   oath  .  .  .  gets    his 
property  released  .  .  .  yet,  ignorant  of  forms  .  .  .  must  assuredly  fall  into  the 

a**5th°  Cotton  is  a  heavy  article  to  he  transported.  .  .  .  If  the  Rebel  came  to 
our  lines,  he  could  bring  only  one  load;  to  secure  that  load,  he  must  take  the 
oath.  He  cannot  get  back  to  rebel  lines  for  other  loads. 
[Question  2:] 
"ist.  We  have  removed  all  the  danger  of  confiscation  &  chfficultios  on  our 

side  of  the  lines.  ... 

"ad.  We  give  him  such  assurance  &  present  to  him,  a  working  plan,  clear 
&  distinct,  which  induces  effort  to.  ... 
[Question  3:] 

".  .  .  .  We  answer  in  New  Orleans — Cincinnati — St.  Louis,  the  great  cotton 
markets.  We  propose  only  to  sell  it,  at  public  auction,  to  make  ourselves  free 
of  all  charge  of  unfairness.  .  .  .  All  the  officers  of  the  Treasury  Depnrtmont 
.  .  .  vouch  for  us,  by  their  recommendations  which  we  present.  .  .  .  The  com- 
manding Officers  of  the  Department  of  the  Military  Government,  vouch  for 
us  #  .  .  Some  of  us  have  shewn  our  faith  in  battle  fields.  .  .  .  We  recommend 
that  the  collector  of  customs  have  a  supervision  over  .  .  .  affairs  .  .  .  The  per- 
mit granted,  if  it  is  found  we  do  not  keep  faith,  or  the  method  \vorks  badly, 
.  .  .  will  ...  be  revokable  at  pleasure  .  .  .  Our  interest  will  induce  Fnith 
.  .  .  We  are  merchants  and  make  our  own  arrangements  as  such — our  fees  <fe 
commissions  are  regulated  by  the  customs  of  trade,  long  established  in  New 
Orleans,  governing  all  transactions.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 

On  January  9,  Wright  and  Hawkes  sent  a  supplementary  reply  ami  enclosed 
a  suggested  form  of  the  order  which  they  hoped  the  president  would  issue.  Al- 
,  though  some  of  the  suggestions  made  by  Wright  and  Hawkes  were  adoptod 
in  the  new  regulations  issued  for  Treasury  Agents  (see  Order  of  January  26, 
infra) ,  no  special  arrangement  with  the  gentlemen  concerned  seems  to  have 
been  made.  Efforts  on  the  part  of  George  Ashmun  to  have  Hawkes  appointed 
agent  of  the  Treasury  also  failed  (Ashmun  to  Lincoln,  January  20  and  Febru- 
ary 2,  1864,  DLC-RTL). 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  January  [8],          ,, 

I  herewith  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action 
thereon,  a  treaty  made  at  the  Old  Crossing  of  Red  Lake  River,  in 
the  State  of  Minnesota,  on  the  2d  day  of  October,  1863,  between 
Alexander  Ramsey  and  Ashley  C.  Morrill,  commissioners  on  the 
part  of  the  United  States,  and  the  chiefs,  headmen,  and  warriors 
of  the  Red  Lake  and  Pembina  bands  of  Chippewa  Indians. 

A  letter  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  of  the  8th  instant,  to- 
gether with  a  communication  from  the  Commissioner  of  Indian 
Affairs,  of  the  5th  instant,  and  copies  of  Mr.  Ramsey's  report  and 
journal,  relating  to  the  treaty,  and  a  map  showing* the  Territory 
ceded,  are  herewith  transmitted.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN-  " 

Executive  Mansion. 

Washington,  January-,  1864. 

[116] 


JANUARY      8,      1864 

i  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  366.  On  January  8,  1864,  the  treaty  was  referred 
to  the  committee  on  Indian  affairs,  and  on  March  i,  1864,  was  ratified  by  the 
Senate.  See  also,  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate,  April  15,  infra. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  Jan.  8.  1864. 

To-day  Senator  Grimes  calls  and  asks  that  I  may  particularly  ex- 
amine the  recommendations  on  file  for  Grenville  M.  Dodge  for 
Major  Genl.  &  Edward  Hatch  of  2nd.  Iowa  Cav.  &  Henry  C.  Cald- 
well  of  the  3rd.  Iowa.  Cav.  for  Brig.  Genls.  which  I  promise  to 
do. 

Will  the  Sec.  of  War  please  have  these  papers  sent  me,  which, 
after  examining,  I  will  return?  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ADS,  DLC-RTL.  Stanton  endorsed  on  the  bottom  of  the  sheet,  "There  is 
no  vacancy  for  Major  or  Brigadier  General."  Grenville  M.  Dodge  was  ap- 
pointed major  general  as  of  June  7,  1864;  Edward  Hatch  was  appointed  brig- 
adier general  as  of  April  27,  1864;  Henry  C.  Caldwell  resigned  on  June  25, 
1864.  See  Lincoln  to  Grimes,  January  11,  infra. 


To  Mrs.  Esther  Stockton1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Mrs.  Esther  Stockton.  Washington  [Jany.]   8,  1864. 

Madam:  Learning  that  you  who  have  passed  the  eighty-fourth 
year  of  life,  have  given  to  the  soldiers,  some  three  hundred  pairs 
of  stockings,  knitted  by  yourself,  I  wish  to  offer  you  my  thanks. 
Will  you  also  convey  my  thanks  to  those  young  ladies  who  have 
done  so  much  in  feeding  our  soldiers  while  passing  through  your 
city?  Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLN 

1  Tracy,  p.  243.  This  letter  is  misdated  "July"  in  the  source,  probably  as  a 
misreading  for  Lincoln's  "Jany."  The  Illinois  State  Journal  for  January  28, 
1864,  notes  that  "President  Lincoln  has  sent  a  letter  of  thanks  to  the  widow 
of  Rev.  Joseph  Stockton,  of  Pittsburg,  Pa.,  a  lady  of  eighty-five  years  of  age 
for  knitting  a  great  number  of  stockings  for  the  soldiers,  and  also  thanking 
the  young  ladies  of  that  city  for  feeding  the  large  number  of  troops  passing 
through."  There  is  an  undated  reply  from  Mrs.  Stockton  (incorrectly  sup- 
plied with  the  date  of  August  5,  1864,  probably  on  the  basis  of  the  date  of 
Lincoln's  letter  in  Tracy),  as  follows: 

"Your  very  kind  letter  was  duly  received.  My  labours  in  behalf  of  our  gal- 
lant soldiers — I  fear  are  some  what  exaggerated.  I  have  endeavored  to  do  what 
I  could  for  those  who  battle  to  crush  this  wicked  rebellion.  .  .  . 

"And  now  my  dear  Sir  in  concluding  .  .  .  permit  me  to  say  that  my  earnest 
prayer  for  you  is,  that  you  may  long  be  spared  to  enjoy  the  blessing  of  a  grate- 
ful nation.  .  .  ."  (DLC-BTL). 

[117] 


To  Simon  Cameron1 

Hon:  Simon  Cameron  Executive  Mansion 

Hairisburg,  Penn.  Washington  B.C.  Jan.  9.  1864 

Your  two  letters,  one  of  the  6th  and  the  other  of  the  7th.  both 
received.  A-  LHWOI-N 

1  ALS  RPB  Cameron's  letters  of  January  6  and  7  have  not  been  discovered, 
but  John'  Hay's  Diary  records  on  January  9,  1864,  that  "Cameron  has  written 
to  the  President  that  the  entire  Union  force  of  the  Pa.  Legislature,  House  and 
Senate,  have  subscribed  a  request  that  the  President  will  allow  himself  to  bo 
reelected,  and  that  they  intend  visiting  Washington  to  present  it.  ... 

To  John  A.  Dahlgren1 

Admiral  Dahlgren  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Jan.  9.   1864. 

Capt.  Lavender  wishes  to  show  you  a  contrivance  of  his  for  dis- 
covering, and  aiding  to  remove,  under-water  obstructions  to  the 
passage  of  vessels,  and  has  sufficiently  impressed  me  to  induce  me 
to  send  him  to  you.  He  is  sufficiently  vouched  to  me  as  a  worthy 
gentleman;  and  this  known,  it  needs  not  my  asking  for  you  to 
treat  him  as  such.  Yours  truly  A.  LHMCOLTV 

1ALS,  owned  by  J.  Coleman  Seal,  New  York  City.  On  January  8,  1864, 
Senator  Edwin  D.  .Morgan  wrote  Lincoln:  "Capt  Lavender  of  New  York 
eighteen  years  a  sea  captain  at  that  Port  comes  to  me  from  so  good  a  source, 
that  I  cannot  refuse  to  comply  with  his  request  to  be  introduced  to  you.  Such 
then  is  the  object  of  this  note,  and  I  hope  you  may  be  able  to  spare  him  a 
few  moments.  He  does  not  want  an  office.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

On  January  23,  Admiral  Dahlgren  replied  to  Lincoln's  letter: 

"Captain  Lavender  arrived  duly  with  your  note,  which  I  was  much  pleased 
to  receive,  and  gave  it  my  immediate  attention; — There  seems  to  me  no  ob- 
jection to  a  a  [sic]  trial  of  his  project,  and  I  beg  leave,  therefore,  to  recom- 
mend that  such  be  made  at  some  Navy  Yard  under  the  eye  of  one  or  more 
experienced  persons. 

"It  would  be  almost  impossible  to  make  the  machine  here,  as  material  and 
mechanics  are  already  unequal  to  the  daily  pressing  wear  and  tear  of  the  ves- 
sels of  the  Squadron.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 

No  further  identification  of  Lavender  or  his  invention  has  been  found. 

Order  for  Observance  of  Mourning 
for  Caleb  B.  Smith1 

Executive  Mansion,  January  gth.  1864. 

Information  having  been  received  that  Caleb  B.  Smith,  late  Sec- 
retary of  the  Interior,  has  departed  this  life,  at  his  residence  in 
Indiana,  it  is  ordered  that  the  Executive  Buildings  at  the  seat  of 
the  Government  be  draped  in  mourning,  for  the  period  of  fourteen 
days,  in  honor  of  his  memory  as  a  prudent  and  loyal  counsellor 

[118] 


JANUARY      1  O,      1864 

and  a  faithful  and  effective  coadjutor  of  the  Administration  in  a 
time  of  public  difficulty  and  peril.  The  Secretary  of  State  will  com- 
municate a  copy  of  this  order  to  the  family  of  the  deceased  to- 
gether with  proper  expressions  of  the  profound  sympathy  of  the 
President  and  Heads  of  Departments  in  their  great  and  irreparable 
bereavement.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

*  DS,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Miscellaneous  Letters,  January,   1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

January  9,  1864. 
Let  General  Blunt  have  leave  to  come  to  Washington. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  OR,  I,  XXXIV,  II,  52.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on  a  letter  from  James  H. 
Lane  and  Abel  C.  V^ilder,  January  9,  1864,  requesting  permission  for  General 
James  G.  Blunt  to  come  to  Washington  to  consult  with  them  "on  the  subject 
of  moving  the  Kansas  Indians  to  the  Indian  Territory  and  the  early  return  of 
the  refugees.  .  .  ." 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Jan.  9.  1864. 

Please  send  me,  to  be  returned,  the  testimonials,  in  favor  of  Col. 
Wickliffe  Cooper,  of  Ky,  to  be  a  Brigadier  General.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN. 

i  ALS,  NHi.  Colonel  Wickliffe  Cooper  of  the  Fourth  Kentucky  Cavalry  was 
not  appointed  brigadier  general. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir:  Washington,  Jan.  9.  1864. 

Please  see  Senator  Lane,  and  if  you  can  appoint  his  man  a  chap- 
lain, I  shall  be  indeed  very  glad.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  L.  E.  Dicke,  Evanston,  Illinois.  Senator  Lane's  man  has  not 
been  identified. 

To  Ethan  A.  Hitchcock1 

Executive  Mansion 
Washington  City,  January  loth.  1864. 

Major  General  Hitchcock,  Commissioner  of  Exchanges,  is  au- 
thorized and  directed  to  offer  Brigadier-General  Trimble  now  a 

[119] 


JTAPsTUARY      11,      1864 

prisoner  of  war  in  Fort  McHenry,  in  exchange  for  Major  White, 
who  is  held  as  a  prisoner  at  Richmond.  He  is  also  directed  to  send 
forward  the  offer  of  exchange  by  Henry  M.  War-field,  Esq.  of 
Baltimore,  under  a  flag  of  truce,  and  give  him  a  pass  to  City  Point. 

ABRAHAM 


iJohn  Heise  Catalog  2477,  No.  28.  "Major  White"  was  probably  Major 
Harry  White  of  the  Sixty-seventh  Pennsylvania  Infantry  and  a  Republican 
senator  in  the  Pennsylvania  legislature.  See  Lincoln  to  Cameron,  October  17, 
1863,  supra.  The  exchange  seems  to  have  been  refused  by  the  Confederates,  for 
White  was  not  exchanged  until  September  .29,  1864,  and  General  Isaac  R. 
Trimble  remained  a  prisoner  of  war  until  April,  1865. 

To  Timothy  E  Andrews1 

January  11  ,  1  864 

Submitted  to  the  Pay-Master,  General  — 

Major  Whitney  is  a  friend  I  would  like  to  oblige,  but  not  to  the 
prejudice  of  the  service.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  11.  1864. 

1  AES,  IHL  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Henry  C.  Whit- 
ney to  Judge  David  Davis,  January  5,  1864,  asking  his  influence  to  got 
transferred  from  the  pay  department  at  Louisville,  Kentucky,  to  that  at  Fort 
Leavenworth,  Kansas.  Davis  endorsed,  "I  suppose  he  wants  to  be  transferred 
to  Leaven-worth,  because  he  wants  to  live  there  after  war  is  over.  You  know 
whether  it  is  right  to  interfere  and  whether  you  can  do  it.  .  .  ."  Stariton  en- 
dorsed "No  change  should  be  made  to  the  prejudice  of  the  service."  Whitnoy 
was  transferred  to  Chattanooga,  Tennessee,  rather  than  to  Fort  Leavenworth, 
Kansas. 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Hon.  Secretary  of  Treasury:  January  11,  1864. 

My  Dear  Sir:  I  am  receiving  letters  and  dispatches  indicating 
an  expectation  that  Mr.  Barney  is  to  leave  the  Custom  House,  at 
New  York.  Have  you  anything  on  the  subject?  Yours  very  truly, 

A.  LIISTCOLN-, 

1  Robert  B.   Warden,  Account  of  the  Private   Life   and  Public   Services   of 

Salmon  Portland  Chase  (1874),  p.  556.  Secretary  Chase  replied  on  January  12, 

Nothing  at  all,  except  urgent  representatives  of  the  necessity  of  reform,  which 

do  not,  at  all  impeach  Mr.  Barney,  in  whose  integrity  I  have   undimimshcd 

confidence."  (DLC-RTL). 

The  many  communications  on  this  subject  from  January  to  September    186  i 
when  Barney  resigned  and  Lincoln  appointed  Simeon  Draper  in  his  place    in- 
dicate that  tiie  issue  was  not  only  "reform"  but  Barney's  purported  activity  in 
support  of  Chase  s  candidacy  for  the  Republican  nomination  for  president. 

[120] 


To  James  W.  Grimes1 

January  11,  1864 

In  pursuance  of  my  promise  to  you  I  sent  for  the  papers  in  the 
three  cases  mentioned,  which  were  brought  to  me  with  a  note 
from  the  Sec.  of  War,  saying:  "There  is  no  vacancy  of  a  Major  or 
Brigadier  General/' 

1  Parke-Bernet  Catalog  451,  April  5-6,  1943,  No.  Z  404.  According  to  the 
catalog  description,  this  is  an  autograph  letter  signed.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton, 
January  8,  supra,  and  to  Grimes,  January  21,  infra. 

To  Robert  Todd  Lincoln1 

R.  T.  Lincoln.  Executive  Mansion, 

Cambridge,  Mass.  Washington,  Jany.   11   1864. 

I  send  your  draft  to-day.  How  are  you  now?  Answer  by  tele- 
graph at  once.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  discovered. 

Memorandum:  Appointment  of  Henry  E  Wade1 

Senator  Wade  must  be  obliged  in  this  matter  before  long — a  West- 
Point  case.  A.  LINCOLN 
Jan.  11.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1864,  No.  176.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  a  memorandum  from  Senator  Benjamin  F.  Wade, 
January  9,  1864,  giving  qualifications  of  his  son  Henry  P.  Wade.  No  record  of 
the  appointment  has  been  found. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

What  does  this  mean? 

Sec.  of  War,  please  call  up  subject  when  we  meet 

Jan.  11.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  NHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  telegram  from  General 
Jeremiah  T.  Boyle,  January  10,  1864,  as  follows: 

"My  superior  officers  have  shown  distrust  of  me  I  cannot  therefore  with 
proper  regard  to  the  public  interest  &  my  own  character  serve  the  public  under 
their  command  Some  one  else  must  go  in  command  I  have  issued  all  the 
orders  preparatory  to  movement  I  ask  to  be  relieved  &  that  my  resignation  be 
accepted  I  can  take  this  course  with  true  devotion  to  the  government  and 
consistently  with  good  of  the  service  I  respectfully  request  the  acceptance  of 
my  resignation." 

No  reply  from  Stanton  has  been  found.  On  January  14  Bland  Ballard  wrote 
Lincoln  advising  acceptance  of  Boyle's  resignation  or  transfer  to  Burnside's  com- 
mand: "His  unfortunate  political  aspirations  have  undoubtedly  done  him 

[121] 


JANUARY      12,      1864 

But,  had  he  been  less  conscious  of  purity,  he  could  not  have  failed 
to  sh;  could  not  discharge  the  delicate  duties  of  his  responsible  office  while  a 
candidate  for  popular  favor-without  being  the  victim  of  innumerable  slaxi- 
ders  /'  (DLC-RTL).  See  further  Lincoln  to  Bramlette,  January  3i,  infra. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant  or  George  H.  Thomas1 

Major  General  Grant,  or  Executive  Mansion 

Major  General  Thomas  Washington,  B.C. 

Chattanooga,  Tenn.  Jan.   ^1864 

Let  execution  of  the  death  sentence  upon  William  Jeffries,  of 
Co  A  Sixth  Indiana  Volunteers,  be  suspended  until  further  order 
from  here.  A-  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  RPB.  The  roster  of  Company  A,  Sixth  Indiana,  lists  William  F. 
Jeffres  as  "missing  at  Louisville,  Ky.  Oct.  i,  1862."  See  Lincoln  to  Morton, 
infra. 

To  Oliver  P  Morton1 

Gov.  O.  E  Morton  Executive  Mansion, 

Indianapolis,  la.  Washington,  Jan.   12,  1864. 

I  have  telegraphed  to  Chattanooga  suspending  execxition  of 
William  Jeffries  until  further  order  from  me.  A 


iALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln's  telegram  to  Grant  or  Thomas,  supra.  No  com- 
munication from  Governor  Morton  concerning  this  matter  has  been  discovered. 

Order  Fixing  Western  Base  of 
Union  Pacific  Railroad1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  January  12,  1864. 
In  pursuance  of  the  eleventh  section  of  the  act  of  congress  entitled 
"An  Act  to  aid  in  the  construction  of  a  Railroad  and  Telegraph 
line  from  the  Missouri  River  to  the  Pacific  Ocean,  and  to  secure  to 
the  Government  the  use  of  the  same  for  Postal,  Military,  and 
other  purposes"  Approved  July  i,  1862,  the  point  where  the  line 
of  the  Central  Pacific  Railroad  crosses  Arcade  creek  in  the  Sacra- 
mento valley  is  hereby  fixed  as  the  western  base  of  the  Sierra 
Nevada  mountains.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLK 

x  ADS,  The  Rosenbach  Company,  Philadelphia  and  New  York.  The  act  pro- 
vided that  the  Central  Pacific  Railroad  would  receive  sixteen  $1,000  U.S.  bonds 
per  mile  and  treble  this  number  of  bonds  per  mile  for  the  portion  "most 
mountainous  and  difficult  of  construction,  to  wit:  one  hundred  and  fifty  miles 
westwardly  from  the  eastern  base  of  the  Rocky  Mountains,  and  one  hundred 
and  fifty  miles  eastwardly  from  the  western  base  of  the  Sierra  Nevada  moun- 
tains, said  points  to  be  fixed  by  the  President.  .  .  ." 

[122] 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  January  12,  1864 

In  accordance  with  the  request  of  the  Senate  conveyed  in  their 
Resolutions  of  the  i6th  of  December  1863,  desiring  any  informa- 
tion in  my  possession  relative  to  the  alleged  exceptional  treatment 
of  Kansas  troops  when  captured  by  those  in  rebellion,  I  have  the 
honor  to  transmit  a  communication  from  the  Secretary  of  War, 
accompanied  by  reports  from  the  General-in-Chief  of  the  Army, 
and  the  Commissary-General  of  Prisoners,  relative  to  the  subject 
matter  of  the  Resolutions.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Executive  Mansion 
January  12.  1864 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  F4.  The  enclosures  printed  in  Senate  Execu- 
tive Document  No.  4  indicate  no  information  that  Kansas  troops  were  being 
"invariably  put  to  death"  as  charged  in  Senator  James  H.  Lane's  resolution  of 
December  16,  1863. 

To  Edward  and  Henry  T.  Anthony1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Dear  Sirs  Washington,  Jan.  13,  1864. 

Please  accept  my  thanks  for  your  pretty  and  acceptable  present 
just  now  placed  in  my  hands  by  Mr.  Speaker  Coif  ax.  Yours  truly 

E  &  H.T.  Anthony  &  Co  N.  Y.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  On  January  7,  1863  [4],  Edward  and  Henry  T.  Anthony,  manu- 
facturers and  importers  of  photographic  materials,  albums,  stereoscopes,  and 
views,  wrote  Lincoln: 

"As  the  President  .  .  .  cannot  be  expected  to  visit  every  place  that  is  worth 
seeing,  the  places  must  follow  the  example  of  the  people  and  send  their  Repre- 
sentatives. 

"We  take  pleasure  therefore  in  sending  you  some  views  of  beautiful  bridges, 
lakes,  and  landscapes  which  may  be  looked  upon  as  the  constituents  of  the  New 
York  Central  Park. 

"Trusting  that  the  society  of  these  quiet  visitors  may  sometimes  afford  you  a 
relaxation  from  the  turmoil  and  cares  of  office,  we  request  that  you  will  accept 
them  with  the  best  wishes  of  Your  Friends  and  Fellow  Citizens"  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Nathaniel  E  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major  General  Banks  January  13,  1864. 

I  have  received  two  letters  from  you  which  are  duplicates,  each 
of  the  other,  except  that  one  bears  date  the  2/th.  and  the  other  the 
3Oth.  of  December.  Your  confidence  in  the  practicability  of  con- 
structing a  free  state-government,  speedily,  for  Louisiana,  and 

[123] 


JANUARY      13,     1864 

your  zeal  to  accomplish  it,  are  very  gratifying.  It  is  a  connection, 
than  in  which,  the  words  "can"  and  "will"  were  never  more  pre- 
cious. I  azn  much  in  hope  that,  on  the  authority  of  my  letter,  of 
December  24th.  you  have  already  begun  the  work.  Whether  you 
shaU  have  done  so  or  not,  please,  on  receiving  this,  proceed  with 
all  possible  despatch,  using  your  own  absolute  discretion  in  all 
matters  which  may  not  carry  you  away  from  the  conditions  stat- 
ed in  your  letters  to  me,  nor  from  those  of  the  Message  and  Proc- 
lamation of  December  8th.  Frame  orders,  and  fix  times  and  places, 
for  this,  and  that,  according  to  your  own  judgment. 

I  am  much  gratified  to  know  that  Mr.  Dennison,  the  Collector 
at  New-Orleans,  and  who  bears  you  this,  understands  your  views, 
and  will  give  you  his  full,  and  zealous  co-operation.  It  is  my  wish, 
and  purpose,  that  all  others,  holding  authority  from  me,  shall  do 
the  like;  and,  to  spare  me  writing,  I  will  thank  you  to  make  this 
known  to  them.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1ALS,  IHi;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  Banks'  letter  of  December  27  has  not  been 
located,  but  that  of  December  30  is  as  follows: 

"Your  message  and  proclamation  can  not  fail  to  produce  great  national  re- 
sults. They  offer  an  escape  to  many  classes  of  people  in  the  South,  who  will 
not  fail  to  yield  their  assent  to  the  conditions  imposed.  .  .  . 

"Much  reflection,  and  frank  conversation  with  many  persons  who  know  the 
southern  character,  thoroughly  confirm  me  in  the  opinion.  I  expressed  in  my 
recent  letters,  that  the  immediate  restoration  of  a  State  government  upon  the 
basis  of  an  absolute  extinction  of  slavery  at  the  start,  with  the  general  consent 
of  the  people,  is  practicable.  ...  I  have  been  greatly  surprised  to  find  how 
readily  my  conclusions  have  been  accepted  by  men  of  strongest  southern  sym- 
pathies, attachments  and  interests. 

"If,  as  you  have  declared  in  your  letter  of  November  the  gth.,  an  early  or- 
ganization in  this  State  be  desirable,  I  would  suggest  as  the  only  speedy  and 
certain  method  of  accomplishing  your  object,  that  an  election  be  ordered,  of  a 
State  Government,  under  the  Constitution  and  Laws  of  Louisiana,  except  so 
much  thereof  as  recognizes  and  relates  to  slavery,  which  should  be  declared 
by  the  authority  calling  the  election,  and  in  the  order  authorizing  it,  inoper- 
ative and  void.  The  registration  of  voters  to  be  made  in  conformity  with  your 
Proclamation.  ...  A  convention  of  the  People  for  the  Revision  of  the  Con- 
stitution, may  be  ordered  as  soon  as  the  government  is  organized,  and  the 
election  of  members  might  take  place  on  the  same,  or  a  subsequent  day,  with 
the  general  election.  The  People  of  Louisiana  will  accept  such  a  proposition 
with  favor.  .  .  . 

"Let  me  assure  you  that  this  course  will  be  far  more  acceptable  to  the 
citizens  of  Louisiana,  than  the  submission  of  the  question  of  slavery  to  the 
chances  of  an  election.  Their  self-respect,  their  amour  propre  will  be  appeased 
if  ^  they  are  not  required  to  vote  for  or  against  it.  Offer  them  a  Government 
without  slavery,  and  they  will  gladly  accept  it  as  a  necessity  resulting  from 
the  "war.  .  .  . 

"Upon  this  plan,  a  government  can  be  established  whenever  you  wish in 

30,  or  60  days.  .  .  .  Defeat  is  impossible,  and  the  dangers  attending  delay,  are 
avoided.  I  would  unhesitatingly  stake  my  life  upon  the  issue. 

"If  this  plan  be  accepted  in  Louisiana,  ...  it  will  be  adopted  by  general 
concurrence,  m  Texas,  Arkansas,  and  Mississippi,  and  in  every  other  southern 

[124] 


JANUARY      ±3,     1864 

state,  as  rapidly  as  you  choose  to  accord  to  them  the  privilege  of  self-govern- 
ment. If  it  be  accepted  in  one  State,  the  World  will  see  that  not  only  the 
method,  but  the  fact  of  restoration  is  accomplished. 

"I  am  opposed  to  any  settlement,  and  have  been  from  the  beginning,  except 
upon  the  basis  of  immediate  emancipation,  but  it  is  better  to  secure  it  by  con- 
sent, than  by  force,  better  still  by  consent  and  force.  .  .  . 

"I  need  not  repeat  what  I  have  already  said,  that  I  shall  cordially  and 
earnestly  sustain  any  plan  you  may  adopt  for  the  restoration  of  government 
here.  It  is  my  duty,  and  my  desire.  With  very  great  reluctance,  and  sense  of 
public  duty,  I  have  made  the  suggestion  herein  contained,  upon  the  same 
principle  that  I  would  impart  important  military  information.  .  ,  . 

"The  plan  of  restoration  contemplated  here  by  the  officers  charged  with  that 
duty,  does  not  seem  to  promise  results  so  speedy  or  certain.  It  proceeds  upon 
the  theory  of  constitutional  convention  to  frame  an  organic  law.  .  .  .  The 
election  of  delegates  cannot  be  called  before  March.  .  .  .  The  convention  could 
not  sit  before  April.  It  could  scarcely  occupy  less  than  two  months.  Its  action 
could  hardly  be  submitted  to  the  People  .  .  .  before  July.  .  .  . 

"The  advantages  secured  by  this  course,  will  be: 
ist.       An  immediate  State  organization. 

2nd.     The  active  &  general  consent  of  the  People  of  the  State. 
3rd.      The  certainty  of  immediate  emancipation  from  Slavery. 
4th.      The  Revision  of  the  Constitution — pari  passu — by  a  Convention. 
5th.      The  exhibition  to  the  World  of  moral,  as  well  as  military  power,  in  the 
suppression  of  Rebellion  and  the  reconstruction  of  government  by  con- 
sent and  participation  of  the  different  classes  of  People. 

6th.  The  certainty  that  it  will  be  followed  in  four  States  immediately,  and 
in  others  as  soon  as  you  desire  it  with  the  same  certainty  as  to  eman- 
cipation. 

7th.  It  places  in  your  hands  the  means  of  the  restoration  of  States,  as  well  as 
the  destruction  of  armies — independent  of  the  possible  results  of  party 
or  political  contests. 

"The  fact  of  restoration  is,  however,  more  important  than  the  means,  and  I 
shall  cordially  sustain  any  policy  you  may  indicate."  (DLC-RTL). 

Banks  acknowledged  receipt  of  Lincoln's  letter  of  December  29,  1863,  supra, 
on  January  11:  "I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of 
the  2Qth  [24th].  December  and  a  duplicate  of  the  same  with  an  endorsement 
dated  the  2gth.  of  December.  They  give  to  me  all  the  authority  I  can  desire. 
.  .  .  Enclosed  you  will  find  an  order  to  be  published  tomorrow,  authorizing  an 
election  of  state  officers  on  the  22d.  of  February.  It  does  not  contemplate  an 
election  of  the  Legislature  or  Judges  until  November  at  the  regular  election. 
...  I  am  confident  that  it  will  receive  a  very  general  support  of  all  classes  of 
people,  and  a  strength  at  the  Polls  that  -will  surprise  as  well  as  gratify  the 
friends  of  the  government  elsewhere.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major-General  Butler,  Executive  Mansion, 

Fortress  Monroe,  Va.:  Washington,  January  13,  1864. 

Let  Wilson  B.  Kevas  [Kerns],  Third  Pennsylvania  Artillery,  be 
respited  xmtil  further  orders.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  409.  The  source  is  in  error  as  to  the  name.  Wilson 
B.  Kerns,  Battery  B,  Third  Pennsylvania  Artillery,  was  dishonorably  dis- 
charged on  January  10,  1865. 

[125] 


To  Simeon  Draper1 

Nothing  yet  about  the  cotton  matter,  although  I  am  still  con- 

...     .       •r  A.  LINCOLN 

sidermg  it. 

Jan.  13,  1864 

i  Emily  Driscoll  Catalog  6,  1948,  No.  59-  According  to  the  source  Lincoln  re- 
plied to  a  note  from  Draper,  cotton  agent  at  New  York,  See  Lincoln  to  Wright 
and  Hawkes,  January  7,  supra. 


To  Quincy  A.  Gillmore1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Gillmore  Washington,  January  13,  1864. 

I  understand  an  effort  is  being  made  by  some  worthy  gentlemen 
to  reconstruct  a  loyal  state  government  in  Florida.  Florida  is  in 
your  department,  and  it  is  not  unlikely  that  you  may  be  there  in 
person.  I  have  given  Mr.  Hay  a  commission  of  Major,  and  sent 
him  to  you  with  some  blank  books  and  other  blanks,  to  aid  in  the 
reconstruction.  He  will  explain,  as  to  the  manner  of  using  the 
blanks,  and  also  my  general  views  on  the  subject.  It  is  desirable  for 
all  to  cooperate;  but  if  irreconcileable  differences  of  opinion  shall 
arise,  you  are  master.  I  wish  the  thing  done  in  the  most,  speedy 
way  possible,  so  that,  when  done,  it  lie  within  the  range  of  the 
late  proclamation  on  the  subject.  The  detail  labor,  of  course,  will 
have  to  be  done  by  others;  but  I  shall  be  greatly  obliged  if  you 
will  give  it  such  general  supervision  as  you  can  find  consistent 
with  your  more  strictly  military  duties  Yours  very  truly 

A  LINCOLN 

i  Copy,  DLC-RTL.  Major  General  Gillmore  replied  from  Hilton  Head,  South 
Carolina,  on  January  21,  1864: 

"I  have  received  your  letter  of  the  13th  inst.  by  Major  Hay,  &  the  matter 
therein  referred  to  will  receive  my  hearty  support.  There  will  not  bo  an  hour's 
delay  after  the  major  is  ready.  I  understand  from  him  that  his  blanks  havo 
not  arrived  here  yet. 

"What  I  propose  to  do  for  Florida  will  render  it  necessary  for  me  to  ho 
there  in  person  to  inaugurate  the  work.  I  have  every  confidence  in  the  success 
of  the  enterprise."  (DLC-RTL) . 

On  January  30,  Gillmore  reported  that  Major  Hay  "has  been  ordered  to  en- 
ter upon  the  special  duties  assigned  to  him  without  delay."  (Ibid.}.  Hay  re- 
mained in  Florida  until  March.  His  Diary  records  on  March  i  that,  "I  am 
very  sure  that  we  cannot  get  the  President's  loth.  .  .  ."  (referring  to  the 
specification  of  the  proclamation  of  December  8,  1863,  that  one-tenth  of  the 
number  of  voters  qualified  in  the  presidential  election  of  1860  might,  upon  tak- 
ing the  oath,  establish  a  state  government).  Hay  was  back  in  Washington  on 
March  24,  without  having  effected  the  purpose  of  his  mission. 

[126] 


To  Theodore  T.  S.  Laidley1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  Laidley  Washington,  Jan.  13,  1864. 

Please  make  a  trial  of  the  Absterdam  projectile,  and  report  to 
the  Secretary  of  War.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Patent  No.  41,668,  issued  to  John  Absterdam  of  New  York  City 
in  1864,  was  for  an  invention  consisting  "in  applying  to  an  elongated  pro- 
jectile one  or  more  bands  of  a  composition  of  metal  similar  to  'type  metal,' 
for  the  purpose  of  securing  a  more  accurate  and  uniform  gauge  of 
calibre.  .  .  ."  (Thirty-eighth  Congress,  Second  Session,  House  Executive  Docu- 
ment No.  51,  I,  299). 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

I  shall  be  glad  for  General  Crittenden  to  have  permission  to  go  to 
New- York,  as  he  desires  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  13.  1864 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  undated  note  from 
Green  Clay  Smith  requesting  permission  for  Major  General  Thomas  L.  Crit- 
tenden to  visit  New  York  and  stop  by  Washington.  Stanton  endorsed,  "Referred 
to  Genl  in  Chief  to  issue  order  permitting  Genl  Crittenden  to  go  to  New  York 
as  directed  by  the  Prest." 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Please  see  &  hear  the  bearer,  Mr.  Pirsson. 
Jan.   13,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  Stan.  V.  Henkels  Catalog  1442,  April  10,  1930,  No.  86.  According  to  the 
catalog  description,  this  message  is  an  autograph  note  written  on  a  card. 
Pirsson  has  not  been  identified. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Private 

Hon.  Sec  of  War  Executive  Mansion 

Sir  Washington,  Jan  13,  1864. 

Gen.  Green  Clay  Smith,  in  order  to  take  his  seat  in  Congress, 
had  to  give  up  his  Military  Commission;  but  he  thinks  he  may 
wish  to  ask  to  have  it  back,  and  go  to  the  field  again  after  a  few 
months,  and  in  view  of  which  he  would  like  to  have  his  Asst.  Adjt 
Genl  William  Cassius  Goodloe  kept  on  foot,  and  asks  that,  to  this 

[127] 


JANUARY      14,      1864 

end,  he  may  be  ordered  to  report  to  the  Commanding  officer  at 
Louisville,  Ky.  If  this  can  be  lawfully  done  let  it  be  done.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Angle,  p.  339.  Representative  Smith  did  not  re-enter  service,  and  Captain 
William  C.  Goodloe  resigned  his  commission  as  of  January  31,  1864. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Jan.  14,  1864. 

Herewith  I  send  to  be  filed,  the  papers  in  regard  to  the  Indiana 
Judgeship.  Besides  what  is  in  the  papers,  Senator,  Lane,  Speaker 
Colfax,  Rep.  Orth  Sec.  Usher,  Bank  Com.  McCullough,  Mr.  De- 
frees  &  others,  all  Indianians,  verbally  expressed  their  preference 
for  Mr.  White.  Yours  truly  A.  LIN-COLT* 

iALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  Ex-congressman  Albert  S.  White's  appointment  as  judge  of  the  U.S. 
District  Court,  to  succeed  Caleb  B.  Smith,  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on 
January  18,  1864. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  Gen.  Butler  Washington,  Jan.  14,  1864. 

This  will  introduce  Thomas  Stackpole,  whom  I  found  in  the 
White-House  when  I  came,  having  been  brought  from  New- 
Hampshire  by  Mr.  Pierce.  I  have  found  him  a  straight,  energetic 
man.  He  desires  to  go  into  some  business  about  oysters  in  your 
vicinity;  and  so  far  as  you  can  consistently  facilitate  him,  I  shall 
be  glad.  Yours  truly  A.  LIISTCOLTNT 

1ALS,  CCamSU. 


To  Charles  E  Mcllvaine1 

Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Bishop  Mcllvaine  Washington,  Jan.  14,   1864. 

I  send  herein  what  you  have  requested.  Yours  very  truly 

A.    LlNCOLTNT 


R™  y  Hai7Tard  *•  E*161^  Lincoln,  Maine.  On  January  6,    1864, 

?DLC  RTL)  Sent  ^   greetines   and   ^quested   two    autographs 

[128] 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 

Major-General  Meade,  Washington,  B.C., 

Army  of  the  Potomac:  January  14,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  the  death  sentence  in  the  case  of  Allen  G. 
Maxson,  corporal  in  Company  D,  in  First  Michigan  Volunteers, 
until  further  order.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  410.  The  record  in  the  case  of  Private  Allen  G. 
Maxson  was  returned  by  Lincoln  to  the  Judge  Advocate  General  on  April  16, 
1864,  along  with  a  great  number  of  other  cases  of  desertion  commuted  under 
AGO  General  Orders  No.  76,  February  26,  1864. 

Memorandum  Concerning  Edward  Haggard1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  Jan.  14,  1864. 

To-day  Hon.  Brutus  J.  Clay  calls  with  Mrs.  Haggard,  and  asks  that 
her  son,  Edward  Haggard,  now  in  his  nineteenth  year,  and  a  pris- 
oner of  War  at  Camp  Douglas,  may  be  discharged.  Let  him  take 
the  oath  of  Dec.  8.  and  be  discharged.  A.  LINCOLN 

Do  the  same  for  William  H.  Moore.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ADS-P,  ISLA.  No  further  reference  has  been  found. 

Recommendation  for  Miss  Weirman1 

January  14,  1864 

This  lady,  Miss.  Weirman,  wants  employment,  and  [I]  shall  be 
obliged  to  any  Head  of  a  Department  or  Bureau  who  can  give  it  to 
her.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  14.  1864 

1  THaroL.  Miss  Weirman  has  not  been  identified. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir.  Washington,  Jan.  14,  1864. 

I  herewith  return  the  papers  in  the  cases  of  Dodge,  Hatch  & 
Caldwell.  Please  send  me  now  a  petition  of  members  of  West- Vir- 
ginia Legislature,  asking  to  have  Gen.  Sigel  put  in  command  there. 
Yours  truly  A  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  DLC-Stanton  Papers.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  January  8,  and  to 
Grimes,  January  11,  supra.  AGO  General  Orders  No.  80,  February  29,  1864, 
assigned  Major  General  Franz  Sigel  to  command  of  the  Department  of  West 
Virginia. 

[129] 


To  John  Brough1 

Gov.  Brough  Executive  Mansion, 

Columbus,  Ohio  Washington,  Jan.  15.  1864. 

If  private  William  G.  Toles,  of  sgth.  Ohio  Volunteers,  returns 
to  his  regiment  and  faithfully  serves  out  his  term,  he  is  fully  par- 
doned for  all  Military  offences  prior  to  this.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  RPB.  No  communication  from  Governor  Brough  in  this  connection 
has  been  located. 

To  Andrew  Johnson1 

[c.  January  15,  1864] 

I  send  by  Judge  John  S.  Brien  a  blank  book  and  some  other 
blanks  to  facilitate  the  taking  oath  of  Dec.  8.  He  will  verbally  ex- 
plain the  mode  of  using  them.  He  particularly  wishes  to  have  Mr. 
Benjamin  C.  Robertson  to  take  the  oath.  I  hope  you  may  find 
Judge  Brien  useful,  in  carrying  forward  the  work  generally.  I  as- 
sume that  anyone  in  military  commission  may  administer  the 
oaths.  Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Hertz,  II,  872.  The  date  assigned  to  this  undated  communication  is  sup- 
plied on  the  basis  of  John  S.  Brien's  letter  to  Lincoln  of  January  26,  1864: 

"You  will  see  by  the  inclosed  slip  [newspaper  clipping!  that  my  fears  as 
to  the  death  of  Benjamin  C.  Robertson  have  been  realized.  He  died  on  22nd. 
last,  which  was  two  days  before  I  reached  home.  It  is  said  to  me  today  by  a 
friend  who  was  at  his  bedside  when  he  died,  that  his  greatest  regret  was,  that 
he  had  not  the  opportunity  afforded  him  to  take  the  oath  before  his  death.  .  .  . 

"But  he  is  gone — his  estate  is  also  well-nigh  gone.  And  his  good  wife  and 
children  will  feel  ever  grateful  to  you,  that  you  have  saved  that  little  to  them 
by  his  pardon.  Please  inclose  the  pardon  to  me  upon  receipt  of  this. 

"There  is  great  rejoicing  here  that  your  book  has  arrived.  I  delivered  the 
book  and  letter  to  Gov.  Johnson  on  yesterday  morning."  (DLC-RTL). 

On  January  30,  Brien  wrote  Lincoln  again: 

"On  my  arrival  in  this  city,  on  the  25th  instant,  I  presented  your  book  and 
letter  of  instructions  to  Gov.  Johnson  and  made  the  suggestions  as  directed  by 
you. 

"It  was  soon  known  all  over  the  city  that  the  book  had  arrived,  and  that  an 
opportunity  would  be  afforded  the  citizens  to  manifest  their  desire  for  the 
establishment  of  law  and  order  and  the  Government  of  the  United  States,  and 
to  place  upon  record  the  evidence  of  their  true  and  hearty  return  to  the  old 
Government  and  to  once  more  enjoy  the  rights  of  freemen.  .  . 

"The  next  day  or  two,  .  .  .  Gov.  Johnson  issued  the  enclosed  proclamation, 
in  which  you  observe,  he  prescribed  an  oath  to  be  taken  by  every  citizen  in 
order  to  [establish]  his  qualification  to  vote.  This  produced  considerable  con- 
fusion. .  .  . 

"Now,  Mr  President,  what  I  ask  of  you  is  to  state,  in  some  form  which  may 
be  made  public,  the  necessary  steps  to  be  taken  by  the  people  of  Tennessee  to 
entitle  them  to  the  exercise  of  the  elective  franchise. 

.    "Does  the  tal™?  ...  the  oath  prescribed  .  .  .  restore  the  party  to  his  orig- 
inal status.  .  .  ?  If  not,  to  what  extent  is  he  benefitted? 

[130] 


JTAISTUARY      15,      1864 

"Are  the  elections  to  be  held  under  the  laws  of  Tennessee,  until  they  are 
changed  by  the  people  in  some  proper  form?  As  a  matter  of  course,  they  must 
be  held  under  the  laws  of  the  state  passed  prior  to  the  rebellion,  or  then  by 
some  rule  established  by  you. 

"I  need  not  say  that  you  will  see  the  importance  of  settling  these  questions 
promptly.  .  .  . 

"May  I  ask  of  you  to  state  as  an  order  what  you  stated  in  the  letter  to  Gov. 
Johnson:  that  any  commissioned  officer  is  qualified  to  administer  the  oath,  and 
that  he  do  so  whenever  called  upon  by  those  entitled  to  its  benefits. 

"Please  let  me  hear  from  you  at  once,  as  I  write  on  behalf  of  the  people 
of  the  State."  (Ibid.). 

See  Lincoln  to  Johnson,  January  25,  infra. 

Memorandum  Concerning  John  Racey1 

[c.  January  15,  1864] 
Dont  pardon  Racey. 

1  AE,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  envelope  addressed 
to  him  by  Senator  John  Sherman  enclosing  a  letter  of  Charles  J.  Albright, 
Cambridge,  Ohio,  to  Sherman,  January  15,  1864,  advising  that  "friends  of 
Racey,  the  leading  Noble  County  conspirator  .  .  .  are  petitioning  President 
Lincoln  for  his  pardon.  .  .  ."  Sherman  endorsed  "I  herewith  concur  in  the 
request  that  Racey  be  not  pardoned."  John  Racey  was  convicted  as  one  of  the 
leaders  of  "The  Hoskinsville  Rebellion"  (Cincinnati  Daily  Gazette,  December 
5,  1863). 

To  Lorenzo  Thomas1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Adjutant  General  Thomas,  Washington,  Jan.  15.  1864. 

It  is  represented  that  Mrs.  Eugenia  P.  Bass,  owner  of  plantations 
in  Missippi  about  seventy  miles  above  Vicksburg,  having  taken 
the  oath  of  allegiance,  leased  and  gave  possession  of  said  planta- 
tions to  parties  of  unquestionable  loyalty;  and  that  you,  acting 
perhaps  in  some  mistake  of  facts,  have  leased  the  plantations  to 
other  parties.  Please  ascertain  how  this  is,  and  if  loyal  lessees  of 
hers,  had  rights  there  prior  to  any  action  of  yours,  do  not  let  them 
be  disturbed.  Of  course  I  know  nothing  certainly  about  this  matter. 
Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1ALS,  IHi.  On  January  15,  1864,  Mrs.  Eugenia  P.  Bass  wrote  Secretary 
Seward: 

"I  have  returned  to  Washington,  to  make  an  effort  to  obtain  the  release  of 
my  brother,  Major  Henry  C.  Bate,  of  the  first  Confederate  Cavalry,  now  a 
prisoner  at  Johnson's  Island.  ...  I  am  deeply  interested  in  rescuing  my 
brother  from  all  connection  with  the  rebellion,  in  which  he  has  so  unfortu- 
nately and  .  .  .  reluctantly,  become  involved,  and  in  reclaiming  the  relative 
on  whose  support  and  protection,  now  more  than  ever  needed  by  me,  I  have 
relied  for  years  past.  ...  I  am  now  called  by  the  care  of  my  property,  and 
an  imperative  sense  of  duty  to  my  family,  to  undertake  the  perils  of  a  journey 

[131] 


JANUARY     l6,     1864 

home  I  have  suffered  much,  very  much,  from  the  Union  army,  by  the 

loss  of  my  property,  and  I  feel  that  I  have  a  claim  to  the  protection  of  the  gov- 
ernment, and  its  favor,  which  it  can  be  accorded  without  in  jury  to  the  public. 

"I  beg  you  to  present  my  appeal  to  the  President.  .  .  ."  (DLC-IUL). 

See  Lincoln  to  Grant,  January  25,  infra. 

To  William  Crosby  and  Henry  E  Nichols1 

Messrs  Crosby  &  Nichols.  Executive  Mansion, 

Gentlemen  Washington,  January  ifi,   1864. 

The  number  for  this  month  and  year  of  the  North  American 
Review  was  duly  received,  and,  for  which,  please  accept  my 
thanks.  Of  course  I  am  not  the  most  impartial  judge;  yet  with  due 
allowance  for  this,  I  venture  to  hope  that  the  artical  entitled  the 
"Presidents  Policy"  will  be  of  value  to  the  country.  I  fear  I  am 
not  quite  worthy  of  all  which  is  therein  kindly  said  of  me  person- 
ally. 

The  sentence  of  twelve  lines  commencing  at  the  top  of  page 
252,  I  could  wish  to  be  not  exactly  as  it  is.2  In  what  is  there  ex- 
pressed, the  writer  has  not  correctly  understood  me.  I  have  never 
had  a  theory  that  secession  could  absolve  States  or  people  from 
their  obligations.  Precisely  the  contrary  is  asserted  in  the  inau- 
geral  address;  and  it  was  because  of  my  belief  in  the  continuation 
of  these  obligations,  that  I  was  puzzled,  for  a  time,  as  to  denying 
the  legal  rights  of  those  citizens  who  remained  individually  inno- 
cent of  treason  or  rebellion.  But  I  mean  no  more  now  than  to 
merely  call  attention  to  this  point.  Yours  Respectfully 

A.  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  NNP.  On  December  31,  1863,  the  publishers  of  The  North  American 
Review  wrote  Lincoln:  "The  subscribers  respectfully  request,  that  the  Presi- 
dent will  accept  the  January  number  of  The  North  American  Review,  sent  by 
this^  mail;  and  they  venture  to  hope  that  the  article  upon  'The  President's 
Policy?  written  by  James  Russell  Lowell,  (one  of  the  editors,)  will  meet  with 
his  approval.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

On  January  22,  they  wrote  Nicolay  in  appreciation  of  Lincoln's  letter  and 
with  the  request  that  they  be  allowed  to  publish  the  letter  "to  remove  any 
erroneous  impression  that  may  have  been  given  with  regard  to  The  President's 
designs.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.}.  In  the  April  issue  the  letter  appeared,  together  with 
the  announcement:  "Nothing  could  have  been  further  from  the  intention  of 
the  Editors  than  to  misrepresent  the  opinions  of  the  President.  They  merely 
meant  that,  in  their  judgment,  the  policy  of  the  Administration  was  at  first 
such  as  practically  to  concede  to  any  rebel  who  might  choose  to  profess  loyalty, 
rights  under  the  Constitution  whose  corresponding  obligations  he  repudiated  " 
(p.  630). 

2  James  Russell  Lowell  had  written,  "Even  so  long  ago  as  when  Mr.  Lincoln, 
not  yet  convinced  of  the  danger  and  magnitude  of  the  crisis,  was  endeavoring 
to  persuade  himself  of  Union  majorities  at  the  South,  and  to  carry  on  a  war 
that  was  half  peace  in  the  hope  of  a  peace  that  would  have  been  all  war,— 

[132] 


JANUARY      16,      1864 

while  he  was  still  enforcing  the  Fugitive  Slave  Law,  under  some  theory  that 
Secession,  however  it  might  absolve  States  from  their  obligations,  could  not 
escheat  them  of  their  claims  under  the  Constitution,  and  that  slaveholders  in 
rebellion  had  alone  among  mortals  the  privilege  of  having  their  cake  and 
eating  it  at  the  same  time, — the  enemies  of  free  government  were  striving  to 
persuade  the  people  that  the  war  was  an  Abolition  crusade.  .  .  ."  (p.  252). 

To  George  G.  Meade  or  John  Sedgwick1 

Major-General  Meade  Executive  Mansion, 

or  Major-General  Sedgwick,  Washington,  D.C., 

Army  of  the  Potomac:  January  16,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  Joseph  W.  Clifton,  of 
Sixth  New  Jersey  Volunteers,  until  further  order. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  410.  Joseph  W.  Clifton's  sentence  for  desertion  was 
commuted  to  imprisonment  in  Dry  Tortugas  by  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  166, 
May  3,  1864. 

To  Edwin  D.  Morgan1 

Will  Senator  Morgan  please  present  my  compliments  to  Judge  Ed- 
monds, &  say  to  him  the  books  will  be  gratefully  accepted  by  me. 
Jan.  16.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS-F,  The  Collector,  December,  1951,  p.  236.  Senator  Morgan  wrote  on 
January  16,  1864,  "Please  read  the  letter  of  Judge  Edmonds  and  return  it  to 
me  that  I  may  tell  him  you  will  accept  of  his  Books."  (DLC-RTL).  No  in- 
dication is  given  of  the  titles  of  the  books,  but  Judge  John  W.  Edmonds  pub- 
lished An  Address  to  His  Law  Students  .  .  .  ,  New  York,  1864,  and  Spiritual- 
ism (with  George  T.  Dexter),  New  York,  1854. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Sir  Washington,  Jan.  16.   1864. 

Some  days  ago,  upon  the  unanamous  request  of  our  friends  in 
congress  from  Connecticut,  and  upon  what  appeared  to  be  good 
reason,  I  ordered  a  change  of  Provost  Marshal  &  commissioner, 
under  the  enrolment  law  in  one  of  the  Districts — the  4th;  and 
they  are  complaining  now  that  it  is  not  done.  Let  it  be  done.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Edward  C.  Stone,  Boston,  Massachusetts.  William  H.  Riley, 
appointed  provost  marshal  on  September  9,  1863,  was  replaced  by  Leverett 
W.  Wessels  on  January  9,  1864;  Frederick  Ellsworth,  appointed  commissioner 
on  September  9,  1863,  was  replaced  by  Edward  J.  Alvord  on  January  9,  1864. 

[133] 


To  Jeremiah  C.  Sullivan1 

Gen.  Sullivan  Executive  Mansion, 

Harper's  Ferry  Washington,  Jan.  16    1864. 

Please  state  to  me  the  reasons  of  the  arrest  of  Capt.  William 
Firey,  of  Major  Coles  Battalion,  at  Charlestown.  A.  LINCOLN- 

i  ALS,  RPB.  General  Sullivan's  reply  was  received  at  i  P.M.:  "Capt.  Ferry 
was  arrested  for  failing  to  enforce  discipline  while  in  command  of  a  scout, 
allowing  his  men  to  straggle  into  private  houses  and  commit  depredations. 
Owing  to  the  gallantry  displayed  by  Maj  [Henry  A.]  Coles  comdg  at  the  re- 
cent attack  on  his  camp,  I  had  restored  Capt  Ferry  to  duty  before  your  dis- 
patch was  received."  (DLC-RTL).  Captain  William  Firey,  Company  B,  First 
Regiment,  Potomac  Home  Brigade  Cavalry  of  the  Maryland  Volunteers,  was 
finally  dismissed  from  the  service  on  May  30,  1864. 

To  Thomas  E.  Bramlette1 

Governor  Bramlette  Executive  Mansion, 

Frankfort,  Ky.  Washington,  Jan.  17,  1864. 

Your  letter  of  the  8th.  is  just  received.  To  your  question  "May 
I  not  add  Q.E.D.?"  I  answer,  "no"  because  you  omit  the  "premise" 
in  the  law,  that  the  President  may,  in  his  discretion,  send  these 
troops  out  of  Kentucky  and  I  take  it  that  if  he  shall  do  so  on  the 
judgment  of  Gen.  Grant,  as  to  it's  propriety,  it  will  be  neither 
cruelty,  bad  faith  or  dishonor.  When  I  telegraphed  you,  I  knew, 
though  I  did  not  say  so  to  you,  that  Gen.  Grant  was,  about  that 
time,  with  Gen.  Foster  at  Knoxville,  and  could  not  be  ignorant  of 
or  averse  to  the  order  which  alarmed  you.  I  see  he  has  since  passed 
through  Kentucky,  and  I  hope  you  have  had  a  conference  with 
him.  A. 


1  ALS,  IHi.  On  January  8,  Governor  Bramlette  replied  to  Lincoln's  commu- 
nication of  January  6,  supra: 

"I  did  not  intend  by  any  expression  in  my  telegram,  to  impugn  the  motives 
of  any  one.  I  only  intended  ...  to  express  my  conviction  of  the  effect  of  the 
order.  .  .  .  My  confidence  in  Genl  Grant  has  been  continuous.  ...  I  regard 
him  as  the  first  Genl  of  the  age.  .  .  .  Had  I  believed  that  the  order  emanated 
from  or  was  sanctioned  by  Genl  Grant,  my  great  confidence  in  him  would 
have  prevented  me  from  telegraphing  to  you.  I  had  reasons  to  believe  that 
Genl  Grant  did  not  know  of  the  order.  .  .  .  This  order  necessarily  exposes  his 
communications  and  supplies  to  destruction.  ...  If  this  order  was  with  the 
approbation  of  Genl  Grant  I  will  await  the  denouement  before  I  venture  a 
judgment  of  condemnation.  Though  I  cannot  now  see  any  good  in  it,  yet  if 
it  be  his  plan,  I  will  await,  with  confidence  the  result,  without  forming  any 
opposing  judgment.  ..." 

After  quoting  his  previous  telegram  and  amplifying  each  point,  the  governor 
continued: 

''May  I  not  -add  —  Q.E.D. 

"In  all  candor  and  with  the  kindest  feelings  I  ask  what  reliance  can  our 
people  place  upon  any  pledge  of  the  Government  and  its  functionaries,  if  this 

[134] 


JANUARY      l8,      1864 

be  not  observed.  .  .  .  Kentucky  loyalty  cannot  be  driven  from  its  secure  lodge- 
ment in  the  hearts  of  the  people,  by  any  bad  faith  of  others.  We  are  in  and 
of  the  Union  and  will  live  and  die  there.  Rebel  outrages  cannot  drive  us,  nor 
federal  injustice  divert  us  from  the  true  line  of  patriotism.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Thomas  B.  Bryan1 

Executive  Mansion, 
My  Dear  Sir.  Washington,  January  i8th,  1864. 

I  have  recieved  the  two  copies  of  the  lithographed  f ac-simile  of 
the  original  draft  of  the  Emancipation  Proclamation,  which  you 
have  had  the  kindness  to  send  me,  and  in  answer  to  your  question, 
I  have  to  say  that  although  I  have  not  examined  it  in  detail,  yet 
it  impresses  me  favorably  as  being  a  faithful  and  correct  copy. 
Yours  truly,  A  LINCOLN. 

Thos  B  Bryan  Esq 

Chicago,  Illinois. 

1  Copy,  DLC-RTL.  Thomas  B.  Bryan  wrote  on  January  7,  1864: 

"I  mail  herewith  .  .  .  the  two  first  copies  of  the  lithographed  Facsimile  of 
your  Proclamation  of  Freedom.  Have  the  kindness  to  inform  me  if  the  copy 
impress  you  favorably  as  an  exact  Fac-simile.  .  .  . 

"It  may  interest  you  to  know  that  the  Original  Manuscript  .  .  .  will  be  held 
by  our  Soldiers  Home  in  trust  for  the  benefit  of  the  sick  &  disabled  soldiers  of 
the  Union  Army.  Although  I  purpose  donating  a  share  of  the  avails  of  my 
copyright  to  the  Home  as  mentioned  in  the  certificate  on  the  face  of  the  print, 
yet  at  the  voluntary  suggestion  of  Dr.  Bellows  of  New  York,  all  copies  sold 
in  the  East  will  yield  a  fund  for  the  U.S.  Sanitary  Commission,  of  which  he 
is  Prest.  .  .  .  The  caption  will  therefore  be  changed.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

Numerous  copies  of  the  facsimiles  issued  by  Bryan  are  extant.  Comparison 
with  the  photographic  copies  of  the  Proclamation  preserved  in  the  Lincoln 
Papers  (see  note  to  Proclamation,  January  i,  1863,  supra)  show  the  Bryan 
facsimile  to  be  accurate  as  to  text,  but  inferior  to  the  photographs  as  an  exact 
reproduction. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  [January  18,  1864] 

Fort-Monroe. 

Gov.  Pierpoint  has  been,  from  the  first,  a  zealous  and  efficient 
supporter  of  the  government.  He  now  understands  that  you  have 
ordered  all  the  nmnicipal  officers  of  Norfolk  and  Portsmouth  to 
report  to  you  in  detail  the  amounts  of  all  money  received  by  them, 
&c.  and  also  that  you  have  constituted  a  commission  to  investigate 
the  condition  of  the  Savings  Funds  and  Banking  institutions  there; 
and  he,  as  Governor,  feels  agrieved  by  these  measures.  The  Presi- 
dent directs  me  to  request  you  to  suspend  these  measures,  until 

[135] 


JANUARY      l8,      1864 

you  can  state  to  him,  in  writing  or  otherwise,  your  views  of  the 
necessity  or  propriety  of  them.  EDWIN  M  STANTON 

Sec  of  War 

1AL-F,  ISLA.  This  communication  was  written  by  Lincoln  and  signed  by 
Stanton.  General  Butler  wrote  Lincoln  on  February  23,  1864,  a  forty-page  re- 
port enclosing  voluminous  reports  and  summaries  from  his  subordinates,  which 
explained  the  necessities  that  had  dictated  the  issuing  of  his  General  Orders  No. 
40  and  clarified  misstatements  made  by  Governor  Peirpoint  (DLC-RTL).  The 
bracketed  date  is  established  by  related  communications  in  the  Butler  Papers 
and  the  Lincoln  Papers  (DLC). 

Endorsement  Concerning  A.  Z.  Boyer1 

Let  A.  Z.  Boyer,  named  within,  take  the  oath  of  December  8th. 
1863,  upon  doing  which  he  is  pardoned  and  to  be  discharged. 
Jan.  18.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1027.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  A.  Z.  Boy  or,  Company 
C,  Second  Kentucky  Cavalry,  CSA,  sentenced  to  be  hanged  as  a  spy.  Letters 
from  James  Speed,  January  12,  and  Brutus  J.  Clay,  January  14,  1864,  requestor! 
Lincoln's  favorable  consideration  of  the  case  (DLC-RTL).  AGO  Special  Orders 
No.  45,  January  29,  1864,  directed  Boyer's  discharge  from  custody. 

Endorsement  Concerning  Charles  T.  Hagan1 


January  18, 

At  the  request  of  the  Hon.  Mr.  Harding  of  Kentucky  it  is  ordered 
that  the  within  named  Charles  Thomas  Hagan  may  take  the  oath 
of  Dec.  8  &  be  discharged  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  18.  1864 

!AES,  owned  by  John  M.  Holcombe,  Jr.,  Hartford,  Connecticut.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Charity  Muclcl  to  Representative  Anron 
Harding,  Springfield,  Kentucky,  January  6,  1864,  asking  that  her  son  Chnrles 
Thomas  Hagan,  captured  with  John  H.  Morgan  and  imprisoned  at  Camp 
Chase,  be  released.  A  portion  of  the  letter,  presumably  bearing  Hnrclinc's  en- 
dorsement, has  been  cut  off. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Let  a  pass  be  allowed  in  this  case.          A.  LINCOLN 
Jan.  18,  1864 


m  R°  107'  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P   27    Lin- 

DC  '  Jeannu°^ment  1LWrltten  °*  a  l6tter  fr°m  Hira™  Sh«w,  Jr.,  Washington, 
toJ^  to  *•  ^er,  Mrs.   B.  P.  Tnunon 

[136] 


To  Whom  It  May  Concern1 

Executive  Mansion 
Whom  it  may  concern:  Washington,  January  18,  1864 

The  bearer,  John  P.  W.  [M.]  Thornton,  a  private  in  Co.  E  6ist 
New  York  volunteers,  comes  to  me  voluntarily  under  apprehension 
that  he  may  be  arrested,  convicted,  and  punished  as  a  deserter; 
and  I  hereby  direct  him  to  report  forthwith  to  his  regiment  for 
duty,  and  upon  condition  that  he  does  this,  and  faithfully  serves 
out  his  term,  or  until  he  shall  be  honorably  discharged  for  any 
cause,  he  is  fully  pardoned  for  any  supposed  desertion  heretofor 
committed.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  William  D.  Morley  Catalog,  January  28,  1944,  No.  84.  AGO  Special  Orders 
No.  26,  January  18,  1864,  ordered  Private  John  P.  M.  Thornton  to  report  to  his 
regiment  for  duty. 

To  John  Clark1 

Col.  John  Clark.  Executive  Mansion, 

Of  3rd.  Regt.  of  Perm.  Reserves  Washington, 

Alexandria,  Va.  Jan.  19,  1864. 

Where  is,  John  Wilson,  under  sentence  for  desertion,  of  whom 
you  wrote  Hon  Mr.  Thayer  yesterday?  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  discovered.  See  Lincoln  to  Sedgwick,  Jan- 
uary 20,  infra. 

To  Robert  T.  Lincoln1 

R.  T.  Lincoln,  Executive  Mansion, 

Cambridge,  Mass:  Washington,  January  19,  1864. 

There  is  a  good  deal  of  small-pox  here.  Your  friends  must  judge 
for  themselves  whether  they  ought  to  come  or  not. 

_^  .      _  .  A.  LINCOLN. 

Ma]  or  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.  JNO.  G.  NICOLAY. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  410.  No  communication  from  Robert  T.  Lincoln 
has  been  found  in  this  connection. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton  and  Henry  W.  Halleck1 

Executive  Mansion 
Washington  Dec.  \_sic]  Jan  19.764 

To-day  Hon.  Joshua  R.  Giddings  calls  and  says  his  son,  Major  Gro- 
tius  R.  Giddings,  of  the  1 4th.  Regular  Infantry,  wishes  his  name 

[137] 


JANUARY      20,      1864 

to  be  remembered,  if  Brigadier  Generals  shall  be  appointed   for 

,       j  .  A.  LIN-COUNT 

colored  troops. 

Submitted  to  the  Sec.  of  War  &  General-in-Chief. 

T  ,Q«,  A.  LIISTCOLN 

Jan.  19.  1004. 

i  ADS  and  AES,  IHi.  Major  Grotius  R.  Giddings  was  appointed  lieutenant 
colonel  as  of  May  18,  1864,  but  not  brigadier  general. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Executive  Mansion 
Major  General  Butler.  Washington  D.C.  Jan.  20.    1864. 

If  Henry  C.  Fuller,  of  Co.  C.  n8th.  N.Y.  Vols.  under  sentence 
of  death  for  desertion,  has  not  been  executed,  suspend  his  execu- 
tion until  further  order.  A.  LmcoL/isr 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Henry  C.  Fuller's  sentence  was  commuted  to  imprisonment  for 
three  years. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion 

Fort-Monroe  Washington  D.C.  Jan.  20.   1864. 

Please  suspend  executions,  until  further  order,  in  the  cases  of 
private  Henry  Wooding,  of  Co.  C.  8th.  Conn.  Vols.  and  private 
Albert  A.  Lacy  of  Co.  H.  4th.  Rhode-Island  Vols. 

A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  Henry  Wooding  was  dishonorably  discharged  on  May  27,  1865; 
Albert  A.  Lacy  was  released  from  prison  on  May  27,  1869. 

Endorsement  Concerning  Charles  M.  Shelton1 

January  20,   1864 

Hon.  James  E.  English,  endorses  the  writer  of  the  within,   and 
states  that  he  personally  knows  much  of  what  is  set  forth  to  be 
true.  The  said  Charles  M.  Shelton,  is  pardoned  for  the  unexecuted 
part  of  his  punishment,  and  is  to  be  fully  discharged. 
Jan.  20.  1864.  A. 


1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  statement  signed  by  Harry 
Peck,  principal  of  Greenwich  Institute,  Greenwich,  Connecticut,  October  17, 
1863,  concerning  Charles  M.  Shelton,  an  epileptic.  One  Charles  M.  Shelton  of 
Company  H,  Second  Connecticut  Volunteers,  had  been  discharged  for  dis- 
ability after  one  month's  service  on  June  26,  1861.  The  roster  of  Company  K, 
Eleventh  Connecticut  Volunteers,  lists  the  same  name  as  enlisted  on  February 
11,  1863,  and  dishonorably  discharged  as  of  August  28,  1863.  AGO  Special 

[138] 


JANUARY      2O,      1864 

Orders  No.  30,  January  20,  1864,  directed  that  Charles  M.  Shelton  "be  released 
from  confinement,  and  discharged."  James  E.  English  was  U.S.  representative 
from  New  Haven,  Connecticut. 

Memorandum : 
Appointment  of  John  D.  C.  Hoskins1 

[c.  January  20,  1864] 
John  D.  C.  Hoskins — 18  years  of  age.  Jan.  19.  1864. 

West-Point- 
Gen.  Hitchcock,  will  present  a  paper. 

I  have  seen  this  boy's  discharge,  by  which  it  appears  that  he  has 
served  thirty  days  during  this  war.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  20.  1864 

i  AE  and  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1861,  No.  395- 
The  first  endorsement  is  written  on  the  envelope  containing  recommendations 
for  John  D.  C.  Hoskins  of  North  Carolina.  The  second  is  written  on  a  letter 
of  H.  L.  Kendrick,  West  Point,  New  York,  to  Colonel  William  A.  Nichols, 
Adjutant  General's  Office,  recommending  that  the  son  of  Charles  Hoskins  (ad- 
jutant of  the  Fourth  U.S.  Infantry,  killed  September  21,  1846,  at  the  Battle 
of  Monterey)  be  appointed  to  West  Point.  John  D.  C.  Hoskins  entered  West 
Point  July  i,  1864,  and  graduated  in  1868. 

Memorandum  Concerning  Thomas  J.  Kellinger1 

January  20,  1864 

Thomas  J.  Kellinger,  having  been  pardoned  upon  condition  of  his 
entering  the  Naval  service,  and  having  been  rejected  as  physically 
unfit  for  that  service,  his  pardon  is  now  made  absolute  and  un- 
conditional. A.  LINCOLN 
Jan.  20.  1864 

1  AES,  owned  by  Julius  E.  Haycraft,  Fairmont,  Minnesota.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement has  been  removed  from  attendant  papers.  AGO  Special  Orders  No. 
35,  January  23,  1864,  ordered  discharge  of  Private  Thomas  J.  Kellinger,  One 
Hundred  Forty-fifth  New  York  Volunteers. 

Order  Concerning  W.  D.  Walker1 

January  20,  1864 

Let  this  man  take  the  oath  of  December  8th.  &  be  discharged.  It  is 
not  improbable  he  is  already  discharged  by  Gen.  Marston2  on 
these  terms.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  20.  1864 

1  AES,  owned  by  R.  E.  Burdick,  New  York  City.  Lincoln's  endorsement  ap- 
pears on  a  letter  from  John  B.  S.  Todd,  January  9,  1864,  asking  release  of  "W.  D. 
Walker,  a  prisoner  of  war,  now  at  Point  Lookout,  Maryland,  &  belonging  to 
Company  C,  sd  Missouri  Vol's.  rebel  Service."  2  Gilman  Marston, 

[139] 


To  John  Sedgwick1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

Major  General  Sedgwicke  Jan-  20>  l864 

Suspend  execution  till  further  order,  in  case  of  private  James 
Lane,  Co.  B.  7ist.  N.Y  vols.  A-  LINCOLN 

1ALS-F,  ISLA.  General  Sedgwick's  telegram  in  reply  was  received  at  8 
p  M  •  "Your  dispatch  directing  the  suspension  of  the  execution  of  the  sentence 
m  the  case  of  Private  James  Lane  of  Co  B.  7ist  N.Y.  Vols  received,"  (DLC- 
RTL).  Private  James  Lane's  sentence  for  desertion  was  commuted  to  imprison- 
ment along  with  numerous  others  on  April  18,  1864,  under  the  order  of  Feb- 
ruary 26,  1864.  See  further,  Lincoln  to  Sedgwick,  January  26,  infra. 

To  John  Sedgwick1 

Major-General  Sedgwick,  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  the  Potomac:  Washington,  January  20,  1  864. 

Please    suspend    execution    of    John    Wilson,    of    Seventy-  first 
Pennsylvania,  under  sentence  for  desertion,  till  further  order. 

A. 


iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  411.  See  Lincoln  to  Clark,  January  19,  supra.  John 
Wilson's  sentence  was  commuted  to  imprisonment.  See  further  Lincoln  to 
Sedgwick,  January  26,  infra. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

January  20,  1864 
Gentlemen  of  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives 

In  accordance  with  a  letter  addressed  by  the  Secretary  of  State, 
with  my  approval,  to  the  Hon.  Joseph  A.  Wright,  of  Indiana,  that 
patriotic  and  distinguished  gentleman  repaired  to  Europe  and  at- 
tended the  International  Agricultural  Exhibition  held  at  Hamburg 
last  year,  and  has,  since  his  return  made  a  report  to  me,  which  it 
is  believed,  can  not  fail,  to  be  of  general  interest,  and  especially  so 
to  the  agricultural  community.  I  transmit,  for  your  consideration, 
copies  of  the  letter  and  report.  While  it  appears  by  the  letter  that 
no  re-imbursement  of  expences,  or  compensation,  was  promised 
him,  I  submit  whether  reasonable  allowance  should  not  be  made 
him  for  them.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

January  aoth.  1864. 

lADf,  DLC-RTL;  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38A  F2;  DS,  DNA  KG  233, 
House  Executive  Document  No.  28.  The  enclosures  may  be  found  in  House 
Executive  Document  No.  28.  No  record  has  been  found  of  compensation  or 
reimbursement  for  Joseph  A.  Wright. 

[140] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

January  20,  1864 

Submitted  to  Sec.  of  War.  If  another  Assistant  Quarter-Master — is 
needed  to  serve  in  Central  Illinois,  or  with  Illinois  troops,  let  Mr. 
Lawrence  be  appointed.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  20,  1864. 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  envelope  endorsed  in  an 
unidentified  hand  "R.  D.  Lawrence  Recomd  for  Asst  Qr  Mr  of  Vols."  A  further 
unidentified  endorsement  reads:  "Left  by  Hon  W.  Jayne  delegate  from  Da- 
kota." Lawrence  was  probably  Rheuna  D.  Lawrence,  a  merchant  of  Spring- 
field, Illinois.  No  record  of  his  appointment  has  been  found. 

To  Frederick  Steele1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington,  D.C. 
Major  General  Steele  Jan.  20.  1864. 

Sundry  citizens  of  the  State  o£  Arkansas  petition  me  that  an 
election  may  be  held  in  that  State,  at  which  to  elect  a  Governor 
thereof; 

that  it  be  assumed  at  said  elec- 
tion, and  thenceforward,  that  the  constitution  and  laws  of  the 
State,  as  before  the  rebellion,  are  in  full  force,  except  that  the  con- 
stitution is  so  modified  as  to  declare  that  "There  shall  be  neither 
slavery  nor  involuntary  servitude,  except  in  the  punishment  of 
crime  whereof  the  party  shall  have  been  duly  convicted;  but  the 
General  Assembly  may  make  such  provision  for  the  freed-people 
as  shall  recognize  and  declare  their  permanent  freedom,  provide 
for  their  education,  and  which  may  yet  be  consistent,  as  a  tem- 
porary arrangement,  with  their  present  condition  as  a  laboring, 
landless,  and  homeless  class";  and  also  except  that  all  now  existing 
laws  in  relation  to  slaves  are  inoperative  and  void;  that  said  elec- 
tion be  held  on  the  twentyeighth  day  of  March  next,  at  all  the 
usual  voting  places  of  the  State,  or  all  such  as  voters  may  attend 
for  that  purpose;  that  the  voters  attending  at  each  place,  at  eight 
o'clock  in  the  morning  of  said  day,  may  choose  Judges  and  Clerks 
of  election  for  that  place;  that  all  persons  qualified  by  said  consti- 
tution and  laws,  and  taking  the  oath  prescribed  in  the  Presidents 
proclamation  of  December  the  8th.  1863,  either  before  or  at  the 
election,  and  none  others,  may  be  voters  provided  that  persons 
having  the  qualifications  aforesaid,  and  being  in  the  Volunteer 
military  service  of  the  United  States,  may  vote  once  wherever  this 
may  be  at  voting  places;  that  each  sett  of  Judges  and  Clerks  may 
make  return  directly  to  you,  on  or  before  the  eleventh  day  of 

[141] 


JANUARY      21,      1864 

April  next;  that  in  all  other  respects  said  election  may  be  con- 
ducted according  to  said  modified  constitution,  and  laws;  that,  on 
receipt  of  said  returns,  you  count  said  votes,  and  that,  if  the  num- 
ber  shall  reach,  or  exceed,  five  thousand  four  hundred  and  six,  you 
canvass  said  votes  and  ascertain  who  shall  thereby  appear  to  have 
been  elected  Governor;  and  that  on  the  eighteenth  day  of  April 
next,  the  person  so  appearing  to  have  been  elected,  and  appearing 
before  you  at  Little  Rock,  to  have,  by  you,  administered  to  him, 
an  oath  to  support  the  constitution  of  the  United  States  and  said 
modified  constitution  of  the  State  of  Arkansas,  and  actually  taking 
said  oath,  be  by  you  declared  qualified,  and  be  enjoined  to  imme- 
diately enter  upon  the  duties  of  the  office  of  Governor  of  said  State; 
and  that  you  thereupon  declare  the  constitution  of  the  State  of 
Arkansas  to  have  been  modified  and  amended  as  aforesaid,  by  the 
action  of  the  people  as  aforesaid. 

You  will  please  order  an  election  immediately,  and  perform  the 
other  parts  assigned  you,  with  necessary  incidentals,  all  according 
to  the  foregoing.  Yours  truly  A. 


i  ALS,  CSmH;  LS,  owned  by  William  W.  Steele,  Pescadero,  California.  See 
Lincoln's  remarks  to  Arkansas  Delegation,  January  22,  and  his  letters  to  Steclc, 
January  27  and  30,  infra. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  Jan.  21.   1864. 

Suspend  until  further  order,  the  execution  of  James  C.  Gratton, 
of  Co.  F.  nth.  Penn.  Cavalry,  and  send  record  of  his  case. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Butler,  January  26,  infra.  The  roster  of  Com- 
pany F,  Eleventh  Pennsylvania  Cavalry  lists  James  C.  Gratton  as  deserted  on 
August  7,  1863,  returned  on  October  30,  1863,  wounded  May  14^  1864,  and 
discharged  August  26,  1864.  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  55,  February  4,  1864, 
announced  the  president's  pardon  of  "James  C.  Grattan"  [szc]. 

To  James  W.  Grimes1 

Hon.  J.  W.  Grimes  Executive  Mansion 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  January  21,  1864 

Yours  of  yesterday  about  vacancies  of  Generalships  was  received 
today  and  referred  to  the  War-Department  for  further  informa- 
tion. I  did  not  give  you  my  understanding,  but  the  Secretary's  dis- 
tinct statement  that  "There  is  no  vacancy  of  a  Major,  or  Brigadier 
General."  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

[142] 


JANUARY      22,      1864 

1  John  Heise  Catalog  2467,  No.  78.  See  Lincoln  to  Grimes,  January  11,  supra. 
Senator  Grimes'  letter  of  January  20,  1864,  endorsed  by  Lincoln  "Submitted 
to  the  Sec.  of  War  for  further  information,'*  is  as  follows: 

"Your  note  of  the  ±5th  inst  in  which  you  informed  me  that  you  understood 
there  were  no  vacancies  in  the  grades  of  Major  &  Brigadier  Genls.  came  duly 
to  hand.  I  suspect  that  there  must  be  some  misapprehension  about  this  for  I 
saw  to  day  in  the  hands  of  the  chairman  of  the  Military  Committee  of  the 
Senate  in  executive  session  a  list  prepared  for  him  at  the  War  Department 
which  showed  that  whilst  there  were  no  vacancies  in  grade  of  Major  Genl. 
there  were  thirteen  vacancies  in  the  grade  of  Brigadier"  (ALS,  NHi). 

Memorandum : 
Appointment  of  Alexander  D.  B.  Smead1 

West-Point — 
This  is  a  very  strong  case.  A.  LINCOLN" 

Jan.  21.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1864,  No.  415.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Major  General  Ethan  A.  Hitchcock, 
January  21,  1864,  recommending  Alexander  D.  B.  Smead.  No  record  of 
Smead's  appointment  has  been  found. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States.  January  21,  1864 

In  compliance  with  the  resolution  of  the  Senate  of  yesterday 
respecting  the  recent  destruction  by  fire  of  the  church  of  the 
Compania  at  Santiago,  Chile,  and  the  efforts  of  citizens  of  the 
United  States  to  rescue  the  victims  of  the  conflagration,  I  transmit 
a  report  from  the  Secretary  of  State,  with  the  papers  accompany- 
ing it.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 
Washington,  January  21,  1864. 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  Fa.  The  enclosures  are  printed  in  Thirty- 
eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  Senate  Executive  Document  No.  10.  The  report 
of  Thomas  H.  Nelson,  minister  to  Chile,  related  the  part  played  by  Americans 
in  helping  to  try  to  put  out  the  fire  and  in  rescuing  victims  when  the  church 
burned  on  December  8,  1863.  Nearly  2,500  persons  lost  their  lives  in  the  fire. 

To  Commander  at  Fort  Independence1 

Military  commander,  at  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Independence  Washington,  January  22,  1864. 

Suspend  until  further  order,  execution  of  Charles  R.  Betts  of 
i2th.  Massachusetts,  and  send  me  the  record  of  his  trial. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  located.  Charles  R.  Betts  of  Company  A, 
Twelfth  Massachusetts  Volunteers,  sentenced  for  desertion,  was  released  on 
May  30,  1864,  on  condition  that  he  join  the  Navy.  He  enlisted  in  the  Navy 
for  two  years,  but  deserted  on  September  3,  1864. 

[143] 


Endorsement1 

January  22,  1864 

Let  the  within  named,  except  Yocum,  take  the  oath  of  Dec  8  &  be 
discharged.  Yocum  is  in  the  Old  Capitol,  not  as  a  prisoner  of  war, 
but  for  an  offence  for  which  he  has  suffered  enough  &  should,  as 
I  think,  be  discharged.  A-  LINCOLN. 

Jan.  22,  1864. 

iStan.  V.  Henkels  Catalog  1379,  October  15,  1925,  No.  32.  According  to  the 
catalog  description  this  is  an  autograph  endorsement  signed,  but  no  account 
of  the  document  is  given.  Concerning  William  Yocum,  see  Lincoln  to  Holt, 
February  3,  1864,  infra. 


Remarks  to  Arkansas  Delegation1 

January  22,  1864 

The  President  announced  to  the  Arkansas  delegation,  this  after- 
noon, that  he  had  determined  not  to  appoint  a  separate  Military 
Governor,  but  to  entrust  to  General  Steele,  the  recently  appointed 
Commander  of  the  Department  of  Arkansas,  with  both  the  mili- 
tary and  civil  administration  of  the  State. 

He  stated  the  reason  to  be  that  the  experience  of  the  past  had 
proved  that  there  was  constant  conflict  between  military  governors 
and  military  commanders,  which  was  injurious  to  the  interests 
under  their  charge.  He  expressed  hopes  that  a  formal  organization 
of  the  State  Government  under  the  terms  of  the  Amnesty  Procla- 
mation would  speedily  be  made  by  the  people  of  Arkansas.  The 
delegation  was  fully  satisfied  with  the  President's  action. 

1  Illinois  State  Journal,  January  27,  1864.  See  Lincoln's  letters  to  Stccle, 
January  20,  supra^  and  January  27  and  30,  infra. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Secretary  of  War,  please  send  me  nominations  according  to  the 
within,  irrespective  of  whether  there  are  any  vacancies 
Jan.  22.  1864  A. 


1AES,  InHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Governor 
Oliver  P.  Morton,  January  17,  1864,  calling  attention  to  past  promises  of  pro- 
motions for  Colonel  John  T.  Wilder,  Seventeenth  Indiana,  Colonel  Silas  Col- 
grove,  Twenty-seventh  Indiana,  Colonel  William  Grose,  Thirty-sixth  Indiana, 
and  Colonel  Benjamin  F.  Scribner,  Thirty-eighth  Indiana.  All  four  were  nom- 
inated on  January  23,  1864,  but  their  nominations  were  returned  to  the 
president  on  February  8,  for  lack  of  vacancies. 

[144] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Jan.  23,  1864. 

I  do  not  quite  understand  the  little  difficulty  about  the  Marshal 
of  Ky;  but  if  you  understand  it  is  now,  clear,  send  me  a  nomina- 
tion of  Mr.  William  A.  Meriwether,  for  that  office.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  William  A.  Merriwether,  whose  name  Lincoln  misspells,  was  con- 
firmed by  the  Senate  on  February  3,  1864. 

To  Alpheus  Lewis1 

Alpheus  Lewis,  Esq.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  January  23.  1864. 

You  have  enquired  how  the  government  would  regard  and  treat 
cases  wherein  the  owners  of  plantations,  in  Arkansas,  for  instance, 
might  fully  recognize  the  freedom  of  those  formerly  slaves,  and 
by  fair  contracts  of  hire  with  them,  re-commence  the  cultivation 
of  their  plantations.  I  answer  I  should  regard  such  cases  with 
great  favor,  and  should,  as  the  principle,  treat  them  precisely  as  I 
would  treat  the  same  number  of  free  white  people  in  the  same  re- 
lation and  condition.  Whether  white  or  black,  reasonable  effort 
should  be  made  to  give  government  protection.  In  neither  case 
should  the  giving  of  aid  and  comfort  to  the  rebellion,  or  other 
practices  injurious  to  the  government,  be  allowed  on  such  planta- 
tions; and  in  either,  the  government  would  claim  the  right  to  take 
if  necessary  those  of  proper  ages  and  conditions  into  the  military 
service.  Such  plan  must  not  be  used  to  break  up  existing  leases  or 
arrangements  of  abandoned  plantations  which  the  government 
may  have  made  to  give  employment  and  sustenance  to  the  idle 
and  destitute  people.  With  the  foregoing  qualifications  and  expla- 
nations, and  in  view  of  it's  tendency  to  advance  freedom,  and  re- 
store peace  and  prosperity,  such  hireing  and  employment  of  the 
freed  people,  would  be  regarded  by  me  with  rather  especial  favor. 
Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

ES.  To  be  more  specific  I  add  that  all  the  Military,  and  others  act- 
ing by  authority  of  the  United  States,  are  to  favor  and  facilitate 
the  introduction  and  carrying  forward,  in  good  faith,  the  free- 
labor  system  as  above  indicated,  by  allowing  the  necessary  sup- 
plies therefor  to  be  procured  and  taken  to  the  proper  points,  and 
by  doing  and  forbearing  whatever  will  advance  it;  provided  that 

[145] 


JANUARY      23,      1864 

existing  military  and  trade  regulations  be  not  transcended  there- 
by, I  shall  be  glad  to  learn  that  planters  adopting  this  system 
shall  have  employed  one  so  zealous  and  active  as  yourself  to  act 
as  an  agent  in  relation  thereto.  A-L- 

This  ES.  is  in  the  body  of  the  letter  given2 

i  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  On  January  20,  1864,  Green  C.  Smith  wrote  Lincoln: 

"Mr.  Lewis  obtained  when  here  some  time  since  a  permit  to  purchase  cot- 
ton. He  proceeded  south  for  that  purpose  but  found  that  the  planters  in  side 
of  our  lines  refused  to  let  him  have  cotton  unless  he  would  furnish  a  ...  pro- 
portion of  supplies  in  lieu  of  the  cotton  purchased.  These  people  are  bound  to 
live,  must  live,  &  they  can  only  live  on  supplies  furnished  by  our  people.  .  .  . 
Therefore  would  it  be  improper  to  allow  Mr.  Lewis  this  privilege.  I  will  stand 
as  sponsor  for  him  that  he  will  not  abuse  this  privilege,  but  in  connexion  with 
it,  obtain  more  valuable  information  upon  which  the  govt.  can  act  than  any 
man  you  can  have  to  operate.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL) . 

A  letter  from  Brutus  J.  Clay  of  January  21  gives  supplemental  information: 
"From  our  conversation  last  night  it  seemed  probable,  Mr.  Lewis  would  leave 
for  the  South  soon,  and  stop  at  Bolivar,  Mississippi,  and  see  my  Brother-in-law, 
C.  F.  Field.  I  thought  I  would  act  at  once  for  him  &  in  behalf  of  those  he 
represents,  as  well  as  of  my  son  Christopher  F.  Clay,  for  permission  to  hire 
voluntary  Labour  to  carry  on  their  plantations  .  .  .  under  such  restrictions 
as  you  may  require.  Also  the  right  to  purchase  and  carry  to  the  plantations 
all  needful  supplies  .  .  .  and  receive  the  proper  protection  from  the  Military 
Authorities  for  carrying  on  their  legitimate  business.  .  .  .  The  season  is  ap- 
proaching for  putting  in  a  crop.  .  .  .  Therefore  despatch  is  necessary,  &  I 
would  like  for  Mr.  Lewis  to  carry  all  proper  authority  to  Mr.  Field  when  he 
goes."  (Ibid.). 

A  draft  of  an  order  dated  January  21,  1864,  is  as  follows: 

"The  Supervising  Special  Agents  of  Treasury  for  ist  Agency,  or  proper 
Treasury  Agents  at  Memphis  or  Vicksburg  will  grant  to  Alpheus  Lewis  Esq, 
necessary  authority  to  purchase  at,  and  ship  from  either  place,  family  supplies, 
to  the  residence  and  plantations  of  such  well  disposed  persons  as  ho  may  name, 
within  the  lines  of  national  military  occupation,  who  will  adopt  the  voluntary 
labor  system. 

"And  the  Surveyor  of  Customs  at  either  place  will  clear  all  boats  containing 
such  supplies  to  any  place  or  places  within  our  lines,  for  the  purpose  of  trans- 
porting said  supplies  and  bringing  back  cotton  or  other  produce  he  may  receive 
in  exchange. 

"The  Military  and  Naval  authorities  are  requested  to  allow  Mr  Lewis  to 
proceed  to  and  from  such  places  as  he  may  desire  with  his  boats,  for  the  pur- 
pose of  carrying  out  the  above."  (Ibid.). 

2  The  letter  given  has  not  been  located. 

Permit  to  Christopher  F.  Field  and 
Christopher  F.  Clay1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,   [January  23?],  1864. 

Confiding  in  the  representations  and  assurances  made  and  given 
by  Hon.  Brutus  J.  Clay  of  Kentucky,  that  if  permitted,  and  af- 
forded reasonable  protection  and  facilities  by  the  government,  his 

[146] 


JTAINTUARY      23,      1864 

brother-in-law,  Christopher  F.  Field,  and  his  son,  Christopher  F. 
Clay,  having,  prior  to  the  rebellion,  had  ownership  and  lawful 
control,  of  several  plantations  in  Mississippi  and  Arkansas  would 
put  said  plantations  into  cultivation,  upon  the  system  of  free  hired 
labor,  recognizing  and  acknowledging  the  freedom  of  the  laborers, 
and  totally  excluding  from  said  plantations,  the  slave  system  of 
labor  and  all  actual  slavery,  and  would  neither  do  or  permit  any- 
thing on  said  plantations  which  would  aid  the  rebellion,  it  is  here- 
by ordered  that  said  Christopher  F.  Field,  and  Christopher  F.  Clay, 
or  either  of  them,  be  permitted  to  so  put  said  plantations,  or  any 
of  them,  into  cultivation;  and  that  the  Military,  and  all  others  act- 
ing by  the  authority  of  the  United  States,  are  to  favor  and  facili- 
tate said  Field  and  Clay  in  the  carrying  forward  said  business  in 
good  faith,  by  giving  them  protection,  and  allowing  them  to  pro- 
cure, and  take  to  the  proper  points,  the  necessary  supplies  of  all 
kinds,  and  by  doing  and  forbearing  in  whatever  way  will  ad- 
vance the  object  aforesaid;  provided  that  existing  Military  or 
Trade  regulations,  nor  any  military  necessity,  be  transcended  or 
over-ridden  thereby.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

I  have  made  the  representations  and  given  the  assurances  as 
within  indicated.  BRUTUS  J.  CLAY 

Feb.  i.  1864 

1  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  The  bracketed  portion  of  the  date  has  been  supplied  on 
the  basis  of  the  letter  to  Lewis,  supra.  The  certificate  in  Lincoln's  handwriting 
signed  by  Brutus  J.  Clay  is  on  a  separate  page,  and  was  probably  drawn  up 
on  the  date  given. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  January  23,  1864 

I  transmit  to  the  Senate  a  copy  of  a  dispatch  of  the  12th.  of 
April,  last,  addressed  by  Anson  Burlingame,  Esquire,  the  Minister 
of  the  United  States  to  China,  to  the  Secretary  of  State,  relative  to 
a  modification  of  the  2ist.  article  of  the  Treaty  between  the 
United  States  and  China  of  the  i8th.  of  June  1858,  a  printed  copy 
of  which  is  also  herewith  transmitted.  These  papers  are  submitted 
to  the  consideration  of  the  Senate  with  a  view  to  their  advice  and 
consent  being  given  to  the  modification  of  the  said  Twenty-first 
article  as  explained  in  the  said  dispatch  and  its  accompaniments. 
Washington,  230!.  January,  1864.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  386  B2.  The  communication  from  Burlingame 
transmitted  an  agreement  of  April  7,  1863,  with  the  government  of  China  that 
the  twenty-first  article  of  the  treaty  of  June  18,  1858,  "shall  be  so  modified 
as  to  permit  duties  to  be  paid  when  goods  are  re-exported  from  any  one  of  the 

[147] 


JANUARY     23,      1864 

free  ports  of  China,  at  the  port  into  which  they  are  finally  imported;  and  that 
drawbacks  shall  be  substituted  for  exemption  certificates  at  all  the  ports,  which 
drawbacks  shall  be  regarded  as  negotiable  and  transferable  articles,  and  be  ac- 
cepted by  the  custom-house  from  whatsoever  merchant  who  may  tender  them 
either  for  import  or  export  duty  to  be  paid  by  him."  The  Senate  advised  and 
consented  to  this  modification  by  resolution  of  February  4,  1864;  and  it  was 
accepted,  ratified,  and  confirmed  by  the  President,  February  22,  1864-  (Sixty- 
first  Congress,  Second  Session,  Senate  Executive  Document  No.  357,  Treaties 

.    .    .    4776-±9099   I,    221.) 

To  Cadwallader  C.  Washburn1 

Major  General  C.  C.  Washburn.  Executive  Mansion, 

[Care  of  C.  &  G.  Woodman  Washington, 

No.  33  Pine  Street,  N.Y.  City]2  Jan.  23,  1864. 

Your  brother  wishes  you  to  visit  Washington,  and  this  is  your 
authority  to  do  so.  A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  General  Washburn  was  the  brother  of  Representative  Elihu  B. 
Washburne.  General  Nathaniel  P.  Banks  wrote  Lincoln  on  January  15: 

"Major  General  C.  C.  Washburn,  who  visits  Washington  upon  leave  of  ab- 
sence, given  by  you,  will  be  able  to  state  to  you  more  fully  than  it  can  be  pre- 
sented in  despatches,  the  condition  of  affairs  in  Texas.  I  have  requested  him 
to  call  upon  you  for  that  purpose.  Although  dated  in  October  he  has  declined 
to  avail  himself  of  the  privelege  granted  to  him,  until  now,  -when  the  public 
service  justifies  his  temporary  absence. 

"You  will  allow  me  to  express  the  hope  that  he  return  to  this  Department 
upon  the  termation  of  his  furlough.  He  is  a  valuable  officer  and  in  his  service 
here,  has  exhibited  the  most  commendable  energy  and  capacity  in  the  dis- 
charge of  his  duties  fully  justifying  the  high  confidence  you  have  reposod  in 
him."  (DLC-RTL).  2  The  bracketed  address  was  inserted  by  a  clerk. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  please  make  out  &  send  me  a  pardon  in 
this  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  25.  1864. 

i  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  466.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  of  B.  Milburn  to  John  D.  Stiles,  January  22,  1864,  testi- 
fying to  the  good  behavior  of  George  S.  Becker  while  a  prisoner  in  tho  District 
of  Columbia  jail.  See  Lincoln  to  Stiles,  December  24,  1863,  supra. 

To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  B.C.,  January  25,  1864. 

My  dear  Sir:  Not  intending  to  hurry  you,  may  I  ask  if  the  new 
provisions  about  trade  in  cotton  and  sugar  are  nearly  ready  to 
go  into  effect?  Yours  truly,  A.  Llls,COLN. 

[148] 


JT  A  1ST  TJ  A  R  Y      2  $,      ±864 

1  NH,  IX,  295.  Chase  replied  on  the  same  day:  "Will  you  have  the  good- 
ness to  name  an  hour  today,  either  at  the  Executive  Mansion  or  here,  which 
you  will  give  to  the  final  revision  of  the  new  regulations  of  trade,  with  me." 
(DLC-RTL.) .  See  Lincoln's  order  of  January  26,  and  letter  to  Chase  of  January 
28,  infra. 

Endorsement1 

January  25,  1864 

Senator  Powell  says  that  of  the  many  applications  he  has,  he 
thinks  the  within  named  may  safely  be  allowed  to  take  the  oath 
and  be  discharged.  He  says  those  designated  as  officers  have  re- 
signed, as  they  write  to  him  and  he  believes. 

Let  them  all  take  the  oath  of  Dec.  8.  and  be  discharged. 

Jan.  25.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  Angle,  p.  340.  Lincoln's  endorsement  having  been  cut  from  the  attendant 
document,  Senator  Lazarus  W.  Powell's  recommendation  is  not  available. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

January  25,  1864 

I  have  declined  to  sign  the  within;  and  yet  I  do  desire  that  an 
examination  of  Mrs.  Bass'  losses  may  be  made  by  those  having 
the  means  of  doing  so;  and  that  she  be  paid,  or  her  account  for- 
warded to  the  War  Department,  in  due  form,  accordingly  as  the 
rules  of  the  service  may  apply  to  her  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  25.  1864 

Majr.  Genl.  Grant. 

1  AES-F,  American  Art  Association  Anderson  Galleries  Catalog  2823,  Feb- 
ruary 25-26,  1930,  No.  240.  See  Lincoln  to  Lorenzo  Thomas,  January  15,  supra. 
Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  order  for  an  inquiry  into  the  claims 
of  Mrs.  Eugenia  P.  Bass  for  supplies  taken  from  her  plantation  for  use  of  U.S. 
troops.  The  document  is  also  endorsed  by  Grant  and  by  Andrew  Johnson  on 
June  10,  1865.  Grant  wrote:  "The  endorsement  herein  will  be  executed  by  the 
present  commander  of  Vicksburg."  President  Johnson  wrote:  "The  endorse- 
ment of  Gen'l.  Grant  hereon  is  approved,  and  will  be  carried  into  execution." 

To  Andrew  Johnson1 

Gov.  Johnson  Executive  Mansion, 

Nashville,  Tenn.  Washington,  Jan.  25,  1864. 

The  oath  in  the  proclamation  may  be  administered  by  the  Mili- 
tary Governor,  the  Military  commander  of  the  Department,  and 
by  all  persons  designated  by  them  for  that  purpose.  Loyal  as  well 
as  disloyal  should  take  the  oath,  because  it  does  not  hurt  them, 
clears  all  question  as  to  their  right  to  vote,  and  swells  the  aggre- 

[149] 


JANUARY      25,      1864 
gate  number  who  take  it,  which  is  an  important  object.  This2  is 
the  President's  reply  to  your  questions  of  the  i^th.      I  intend  to 


start  for  Nashville  in  the  morning.  Will  go  directly  through- 
stopping  a  few  hours  in  Cincinnati,  where  a  dispatch  will  reach 

HORACE  MAYISTARD 

Please  send  the  above  as  public  business.  A.  LINCOLN 

1AL  and  AES,  RPB.  The  manuscript  telegram   is   in   Lincoln's   autograph 

excepting  the  portion  noted.  See  Lincoln  to  Johnson,  January   15,  supra. 

2  The  remainder  down  to  and  including  Maynard's  signature  is  in  Maynard's 

autograph. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major-General  Meade:  January  25,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  Robert  Gill,  ordered  to 
be  shot  on  the  2Qth  instant,  and  forward  record  for  examination. 

A.  LINCOLN. 
Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY. 
1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  412.  No  reply  has  been  found.  See  Lincoln  to  Stan- 
ton,  January  a  8,  infra. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major-General  Meade:  January  25,   1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  sentence  Samuel  Tyler,  of  Company  G, 
Third  Regiment  New  Jersey  Volunteers,  in  First  Brigade,  First 
Division,  Sixth  Corps,  and  forward  record  for  examination. 

A.  LINCOLN. 
Major  Ectert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch         JNO.  G.  NICOLAY. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  412.  No  reply  has  been  found.  Samuel  Tyler,  sen- 
tenced for  desertion,  was  transferred  to  Company  C,  Fifteenth  New  Jersey  Vol- 
unteers and  served  until  mustered  out  with  the  company  on  September  23, 
1864.  His  pardon  was  announced  in  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  68,  February  11, 
1864. 

Recommendation  for  Henry  R.  Green1 

Washington     Jan  25.   1864 

This  is  to  show  that  Henry  R.  Greene  Esq  of  Illinois  is  an  upright, 
honorable  and  worthy  man.  I  have  known  him  and  his  family  for 
many  years. 

[150] 


JANUARY      2  69      1864 

Mr  Greene  goes  to  New  Orleans  intending  to  establish  himself 
in  some  business  there.  For  several  years  before  the  commence- 
ment of  the  Rebellion,  he  spent  his  winters  there  and  is  acquainted 
with  the  customs  of  the  South. 

I  hope  the  various  commanders,  agents  and  employees  of  the 
Government  will  extend  to  Mr  Greene  such  aid  and  facilities  as 
are2  proper  and  consistent  with  the  interests  of  the  service. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  DS-P,  ISLA.  Henry  R.  Green  was  a  resident  of  Delavan,  Illinois. 

2  "Is"  corrected  to  "are"  by  Lincoln. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe  Washington,  Jan.  26.  1864. 

Some  days  ago  a  despatch  was  sent  to  stay  execution  of  James 
C.  Gratton,  &  perhaps  some  others,  which  has  not  been  answered. 
Please  answer.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  discovered.  See  Lincoln  to  Butler,  January 
21,  supra. 

Memorandum1 

I  find  this  bundle  of  somewhat  old  papers  upon  my  table,  &  can 
not  remember  for  what  object  they  were  left.  Please  file  them. 
Jan.  26.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ADS,  owned  by  Robert  R.  Spaulding,  Providence,  Rhode  Island.  The  bundle 
of  papers  has  not  been  identified. 

Order  Approving  Trade  Regulations1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  January  26,  1864. 

I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President  of  the  United  States,  having  seen 
and  considered  the  Additional  Regulations  of  Trade  prescribed  by 
the  Secretary  of  the  Treasury,  and  numbered  LI,  LII,  LIII,  LIV, 
LV,  and  LVI,  do  hereby  approve  the  same;  and  I  further  declare 
and  order  that  all  property  brought  in  for  sale  in  good  faith,  and 
actually  sold  in  pursuance  of  said  Regulations  LII,  LIII,  LIV,  LV, 
and  LVI,  after  the  same  shall  have  taken  effect  and  come  in  force 
as  provided  in  Regulation  LVI,  shall  be  exempt  from  confiscation 
or  forfeiture  to  the  United  States.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

[151] 


JANUARY      26,      ±864 

1  Additional  Regulations  Concerning  Commercial  Intercourse  ivith  and  in 
States  Declared  in  Insurrection,  January  26,  1864.  The  Treasury  regulations 
referred  to  are  printed  in  the  same  pamphlet.  See  Lincoln  to  Chase  January 
25,  supra,  and  January  28,  infra;  also  the  orders  of  February  2  and  May  20, 
1864,  infra. 

To  John  Sedgwick1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major-General  Sedgwick:  January  26,  1864. 

Your  letter  of  January  22,  received.  Svispend  execution  of  sen- 
tence in  all  the  capital  cases  mentioned  in  General  Orders  No.  i 
and  2,  where  it  has  not  already  been  done.  I  recapitulate  the  whole 
list  of  capital  cases  mentioned  in  said  orders  including  those  cases 
in  which  execution  has  been  heretofore,  as  well  as  those  on  which 
it  is  now  suspended. 

Private  John  Wilson,  Company  D,  Seventy-first  Pennsylvania; 
Private  James  Lane,  Company  B,  Seventy-first  New  York;  Private 
Joseph  W.  Clifton,  Company  F,  Sixth  New  Jersey;  Private  Ira 
Smith,  Company  I,  Eleventh  New  Jersey;  Private  Allen  G.  Max- 
son,  Company  D,  First  Michigan;  Private  John  Keatly,  Company 
I,  Second  Delaware;  Private  Daniel  P  Byrnes,  Company  A, 
Ninety-eighth  Pennsylvania;  Private  Samuel  Tyler,  Company  G, 
Third  New  Jersey;  Private  Robert  Gill,  Company  D,  Sixth  New- 
York  Cavalry. 

Forward  the  records  in  these  cases  for  examination. 

A.  LiisrcouNr. 
Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY. 

1  Tarbell   (Appendix),  pp.  412-13.  General  Sedgwick  wrote  on  January   22: 

"Enclosed  I  have  the  honor  to  transmit  copies  of  General  Court  Martial  Or- 
ders Nos.  i  &  2  current  series  from  these  Head  Quarters. 

"The  execution  of  the  sentence  in  all  the  capital  cases  mentioned  in  Gen- 
eral Orders  No.  i,  except  that  of  Private  Ira  Smith,  nth  New  Jersey,  has 
been  suspended  by  your  order  and  the  records  in  the  cases  forwarded  for  your 
action. 

"The  orders  will  be  carried  out  in  the  cases  of  Private  Smith  and  those  men 
mentioned  in  General  Orders  No  2  unless  you  interpose."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  a  pardon  in  this  case. 

Jan.  27.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  CSmH.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Represent- 
ative Austin  A.  King,  January  27,  1864,  asking  pardon  for  John  B.  Corner  of 
Ray  County,  Missouri,  indicted  for  conspiracy  against  the  government. 

[152] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

January  27,  1864 

This  is  a  good  recommendation  for  a  territorial  Judgeship,  em- 
bracing both  sides  in  Missouri  &  many  other  respectable  gentle- 
men. A.  LINCOLN 
Jan.  27,  1864 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Austin  A. 
King  and  others,  January  5,  1864,  recommending  Judge  Solomon  P.  McCurdy 
of  Missouri.  McCurdy's  appointment  as  associate  justice  for  Utah  Territory  was 
confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  April  21,  1864. 

To  John  G.  Foster1 

Majr.  Gen.  Foster  Washington,  B.C., 

Knoxville,  Tenn.  January  27  1864 

Is  a  supposed  correspondence  between  Gen.  Longstreet  and 
yourself,  about  the  amnesty  proclamation,  which  is  now  in  the 
newspapers,  genuine?  A.  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  RPB.  General  Foster  had  sent  copies  of  his  correspondence  with 
Longstreet  to  Halleck  and  Grant  on  January  26,  and  replied  to  Lincoln's  tele- 
gram on  January  30,  1864:  "Telegram  of  twenty  seventh  (27th)  received.  I 
have  had  a  correspondence  with  Genl  Longstreet  upon  the  subject  of  the 
amnesty  proclamation,  but  cannot  say  whether  the  newspapers  have  the  cor- 
rect version  as  I  have  not  seen  them.  Copies  of  the  letters  are  on  their  way  to 
Washington."  (DLC-RTL). 

The  letters  as  printed  in  the  New  York  Tribune  for  January  25,  1864,  were 
substantially  correct.  The  text  from  the  Tribune  as  given  below  corresponds 
with  that  of  the  Official  Records  (III,  IV,  50-51)  except  for  the  variants  given 
in  brackets.  In  addition  to  the  two  letters  as  given  by  the  Tribune,  Longstreet's 
further  letter  of  January  11  and  Foster's  reply  of  January  17  appear  in  the 
Official  Records,  but  since  they  add  little  to  the  facts  of  the  story  or  the  humor 
of  the  situation  they  are  not  reproduced. 

COPY    OF    LETTER    RECEIVED    PROM     LIEUT-GEN".    J.    LONGSTREET, 

AT     HEADQUARTERS    DEPARTMENT     OF    THE    OHIO,     AND 

REPLY    OF    MAJ.     GEN.    J.    G.     FOSTER,    COMMANDING 

DEPARTMENT    OF     THE    OHIO,    KNOXVILLE,     TENN. 

Headquarters  Confederate  Forces,  East  Tenn., 
To  the  Commanding  General  U.S.  Forces,  East  Tenn.  Jan.  3,  1864. 

Sir:  I  find  the  Proclamation  of  President  Lincoln  of  the  8th  of  December 
last,  in  circulation  in  handbills  among  our  soldiers.  The  immediate  object  of 
this  circulation  appears  to  be  to  induce  our  soldiers  to  quit  our  ranks  and  to 
take  the  oath  of  allegiance  to  the  United  States  Government.  I  presume,  how- 
ever, that  the  great  object  and  end  in  view  is  to  hasten  the  day  of  peace. 

I  respectfully  suggest,  for  your  consideration,  the  propriety  of  communicat- 
ing any  views  that  your  Government  may  have  upon  this  subject  through  me, 
rather  than  by  handbills  circulated  among  our  soldiers.  The  few  men  who 
may  desert  under  the  promise  held  out  in  the  Proclamation  can  not  be  men  of 
character  or  standing.  If  they  desert  their  cause  they  degrade  [disgrace]  them- 
selves in  the  eyes  of  God  and  of  man.  They  can  do  your  cause  no  good,  nor 
can  they  injure  ours. 

[153] 


JANUARY      27,      1864 

As  a  great  nation,  you  can  accept  none  but  an  honorable  peace;  as  a  noble 
people,  you  could  have  us  accept  nothing  less.  I  submit,  therefore,  whether  the 
mode  that  I  suggest  would  not  be  more  likely  to  lead  to  an  honorable  end  than 
such  a  circulation  of  a  partial  promise  of  freedom  [pardon], 

I  am,  Sir,  very  respectfully,  your  most  obedient  servant, 

J.  LONGSTREET,  Lieut-Gen.  Commanding 

REPLY   OF    MAJ-QEN.    JNO.    G.    FOSTER,    COMMANDING 
DEPARTMENT    OF    THE    OHIO. 

Headquarters  Department  of  the  Ohio, 

Knoxville,  E.T., 

Lieut.-Gen.  Commanding  Forces  in  East  Tennessee:  Jan.  7,  1864. 

Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  dated  Jan.  3, 
1864:  you  are  correct  in  the  supposition  that  the  great  object  in  view  in  the 
circulation  of  the  President's  Proclamation,  is  to  induce  those  now  in  Rebellion 
against  the  Government,  to  lay  aside  their  arms,  and  return  to  their  allegiance 
as  citizens  of  the  United  States,  thus  securing  the  re-union  of  States  now 
arrayed  in  hostility  against  one  another  and  restoration  of  peace.  The  imme- 
diate effect  of  the  circulation  may  be  to  cause  many  men  to  leave  your  ranks, 
to  return  home,  or  come  within  our  lines,  and,  in  view  of  this  latter  course,  it 
has  been  thought  proper  to  issue  an  order  announcing  the  favorable  terms 
on  which  deserters  will  be  received. 

I  accept,  however,  your  suggestion  that  it  would  have  been  more  courteous 
to  have  sent  these  documents  to  you  for  circulation,  and  I  embrace  with  pleas- 
ure the  opportunity  thus  afforded  to  enclose  to  you  twenty  (20)  copies  of  each 
of  these  documents  and  rely  upon  your  generosity  and  desire  for  pence,  to  give 
publicity  to  the  same  among  your  officers  and  men. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  General,  Very  Respectfully, 

J.  G.  FOSTER,  Maj.-Gen.  Commanding 

Memorandum : 
Appointment  of  Edward  L.  Wooden1 

West-Point 

Edward  L,  Wooden,  of  Conn — 18  in  Augt.  1863,  is  5.  feet  10.  and 
has  served  9  months  in  the  War — upon  the  Mississippi. 

Jan.  27.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1864,  No.  196.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Edward  L.  Wooden  to  Stanton,  January 
22,  1864,  applying  for  appointment  to  West  Point  and  setting  forth  that  he 
iaad  served  from  September  2,  1862,  to  August  30,  1863,  in  the  Twenty-third 
Connecticut  Volunteers.  No  appointment  is  of  record. 

To  Frederick  Steele1 

_-  .  Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

Major  General  Steele:  January  27,  1864, 

I  have  addressed  a  letter  to  you,  and  put  it  in  the  hands  of  Mr. 
Gantt  and  other  Arkansas  gentlemen,  containing  a  programme  for 
an  election  in  that  State.  This  letter  will  be  handed  you  by  som'e 

[154] 


JANUARY      28,      1864 

of  these  gentlemen.  Since  writing,  it  I  see  that  a  convention  in 
Arkansas,  having  the  same  general  object,  has  taken  some  action, 
which  I  am  afraid  may  clash  somewhat  with  my  programme.  I 
therefore  can  do  no  better  than  to  ask  you  to  see  Mr.  Gantt  imme- 
diately on  his  return,  and  with  him,  do  what  you  and  he  may 
deem  necessary  to  harmonize  the  two  plans  into  one,  and  then 
put  it  through  with  all  possible  vigor.  Be  sure  to  retain  the  free 
State  constitutional  provision  in  some  unquestionable  form,  and 
you  and  he  can  fix  the  rest.  The  points  I  have  made  in  the  pro- 
gramme have  been  well  considered.  Take  hold  with  an  honest 
heart  and  a  strong  hand.  Do  not  let  any  questionable  man  control 
or  influence  you.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

iALS,  owned  by  William  W.  Steele,  Pescadero,  California.  See  Lincoln's 
letter  to  Steele,  January  20,  supra,  which  was  carried  by  Edward  W.  Gantt. 
Isaac  Murphy,  chosen  provisional  governor  of  Arkansas  by  convention  in 
January,  1864,  was  elected  by  popular  vote  in  March  and  inaugurated  on 
April  18,  1864.  See  further  Lincoln  to  Steele,  January  30,  infra. 

To  George  L.  Andrews1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  January  28,  1864. 
To  the  Commanding  Officer  at  Fort  Preble,  Portland,  Me.: 

Suspend  the  execution  of  death  sentence  of  Charles  Caple,  until 
further  orders,  and  forward  record  for  examination. 

A.  LINCOLN. 
Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.  I  infer  from  the  letter  on  which  the 
reprieve  is  granted  that  Fort  Preble  is  in  Maine,  but  do  not  cer- 
tainly know.  Please  inquire  of  Colonel  Hardee.  As  the  execution 
was  set  for  to-morrow,  it  is  important  that  the  dispatch  should  go 
at  once.  Jisro.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  413.  Major  George  L.  Andrews  replied  on  the  same 
day:  "Charles  G.  Capell  was  enlisted  at  this  post  June  i,  1863,  he  was  born  in 
England  aged  22  years,  occupation  Laborer.  June  6,  1863  he  was  assigned  to 
Company  *C'  ad  Battalion  i/th  Infy.  U.S.A.  and  bore  a  good  character  until 
Aug.  12.  1863  at  which  time  he  was  'absent  without  leave'  Aug  15,  1863, 
having  been  absent  three  days  he  was  reported  a  deserter.  Nothing  more  was 
known  of  him  until  Nov  15.  1863  when  notice  was  received  of  his  arrest  as  a 
deserter  and  Nov.  30,  1863  he  was  delivered  at  this  post.  About  the  ist.  of 
Jany.,  inst.  by  the  connivance  of  his  guard  he  escaped  from  confinement,  but 
a  few  days  after  was  arrested  at  Camp  Perry  (by  a  Sergt.  Geo.  F.  Adams  from 
this  command,  who  was  sent  in  search  of  him)  having  enlisted  and  received 
the  bounty  in  one  of  the  Maine  Cavalry  Regts.  about  leaving  for  the  field.  No 
information  as  regards  his  trial  or  sentence,  has  ever  been  received  at  this  post 
until  your  telegram  of  this  date;  and  he  has  been  held  as  awaiting  trial." 
(DLC-RTL). 

[155] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  pardons  in  these  cases. 
Jan.  28.  1864  A- 

1AES  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  James  E. 
Wright  and  G.  T.  Blakey,  Russellville,  Kentucky,  to  Representative  Henry 
Grider,  January  20,  1864,  asking  his  influence  to  obtain  pardons  for  William 
M.  Clark  and  James  McCallen,  indicted  for  treason. 

To  Salmon  P.  Chase1 

Executive  Mansion,  January  28,  1864. 

My  dear  Sir:  Herewith  I  return  this  proof-sheet  of  the  new 
rules.  I  suggest  two  points,  but  do  not  urge  them.  First,  that  as  the 
trust  and  emoluments  of  the  agents  are  to  be  increased,  should 
not  their  bonds  be  increased?2  Secondly,  might  it  not  be  well  to  fix 
a  maximum,  as  is  sometimes  done  in  acts  of  Congress,  beyond 
which  the  one  per  cent,  compensation  shall  not  go  in  a  year?3 

If  the  increase  of  business  should  necessitate  the  appointment  of 
an  additional  agent,  I  would  be  glad  for  Charles  K.  Hawkes  to  be 
appointed.  He  is  one  of  the  three  so  favorably  mentioned  by  the 
treasury  and  other  officers  at  New  Orleans,  in  the  letter  I  read  in 
your  hearing  twice  or  thrice,  I  believe.4  I  have  some  reason  to  be- 
lieve it  would  please  General  Banks,  though  he  has  not  said  so, 
that  I  have  heard.  I  have  heard  that  he  and  General  Banks  are  old 
acquaintances  and  friends.  Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  NH,  IX,  298.  See  the  Orders  of  January  26,  supra,  and  February  2,  infra. 

2  Chase  replied  on  the  same  day,  "I  have  prepared   the   amendments   sug- 
gested by  you.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL).  Regulation  LIII  as  revised  set  the  amount 
of  bond  required  of  supervising  special  agents  and  assistant  special   agents  at 
$50,000. 

8  Regulation  LIII  as  revised  provided  that  the  "aggregate  compensation  of 
no  Supervising  Special  Agent  or  Assistant  Special  Agent  shall  exceed  the  sum 
of  five  thousand  dollars  per  annum,  or  at  that  rate  for  a  less  period." 

4  See  note  to  Lincoln's  letter  to  Wright  and  Hawkes,  January  7,  supra.  No 
record  of  Hawkes'  appointment  has  been  discovered. 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

January  28,  1864 

This  boy  says  he  knows  Secretary  Chase,  and  would  like  to  have 
the  place  made  vacant  by  William  Johnson's  death.  I  believe  he 
is  a  good  boy  and  I  should  be  glad  for  him  to  have  the  place  if  it 
is  still  vacant.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  28,  1864 

[156] 


JANUARY      28,      1864 

iADS,  DNA  WR  RG  56,  Treasury  Department,  Personnel  Records.  The 
Negro  boy  was  Solomon  James  Johnson  (see  John  E.  Washington,  They  Knew 
Lincoln,  pp.  135-41).  See  also  Lincoln's  note  to  Chase  concerning  a  promotion 
for  Solomon  J.  Johnson,  March  15,  1865.  In  addition  to  working  as  messenger 
for  the  Treasury  Department,  William  H.  Johnson  had  been  Lincoln's  personal 
barber  and  valet. 


To  Commanding  Officer  at  Fort  Mifflin1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Commanding  Officer,  Fort  Mifflin:  January  28,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  Bernard  Develin,  Com- 
pany E,  Eighty-first  Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  until  further  orders, 
and  forward  record  for  examination.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.          JJNTO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  413.  No  reply  has  been  discovered.  AGO  Special 
Orders  No.  41,  January  27,  1864,  directed  that  the  original  order  for  Develin's 
execution  on  February  5,  1864,  issued  by  the  Department  of  the  Susquehanna 
(General  Orders  No.  25,  December  22,  1863)  "will  be  executed  under  the 
orders  of  the  Commanding  General  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac."  No  further 
record  has  been  found.  The  roster  of  Company  E  lists  Bernard  Develin  as 
absent  by  court-martial  at  muster-out  on  June  29,  1865. 


To  John  W.  Forney1 

Will  see  the  gentlemen  at  7.  P.M.  this  evening.          A.  LINCOLN 
Jan.  28.  1864 

1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  John  W. 
Forney,  January  28,  1864,  asking  for  an  interview  on  the  part  of  Simon  Cam- 
eron, Henry  C.  Johnson,  Speaker  of  the  Pennsylvania  House  of  Representatives, 
and  himself. 


To  Henry  W.  Halleck1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Maj  Genl  Halleck.  Jany  28th.   1864. 

Some  citizens  of  Missouri — vicinity  of  Kansas  City — are  appre- 
hensive that  there  is  special  danger  of  renewed  troubles  in  that 
neighbourhood  and  thence  on  the  route  toward  New-Mexico.  I  am 
not  impressed  that  the  danger  is  very  great  or  imminent,  but  I 
will  thank  you  to  give  Genls  Rosecrans  and  Curtis  respectively 

[157] 


JANUARY      28,      1864 

such  orders  as  may  turn  their  attention  thereto  and  prevent  as  far 
as  possible  the  apprehended  disturbances.  Yours  truly, 

A.  LiisrcoLiNr. 

3-Copy  DNA  WR  RG  108,  Headquarters  of  the  Army,  Letters  Received, 
Document  File  1864,  iSs/L.  General  Samuel  R.  Curtis  had  boon  assigned  to 
command  the  Department  of  Kansas  on  January  i,  1864,  and  General  William 
S.  Rosecrans  had  been  assigned  to  command  the  Department  of  the  Missouri 
on  January  22.  On  January  29,  Halleck  sent  the  following  despatch  to  each: 
"Some  citizens  of  Missouri  having  represented  to  the  President  that  there  is 
special  danger  of  renewed  troubles  in  the  neighborhood  of  Kansas  City  and 
on  the  route  toward  New  Mexico,  he  directs  that  your  attention  be  called  to 
the  matter,  so  that,  if  necessary,  measures  may  be  taken  to  prevent  the  ap- 
prehended disturbance."  (OR,  I,  XXXIV,  II,  184). 


To  Edward  Stanly1 

Hon.  Edward  Stanley  Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

San  Francisco.  Cal.  January  28,  1864. 

Yours  of  yesterday  received.  We  have  rumors  similar  to  the 
despatch  received  by  you,  but  nothing  very  definite  from  North 
Carolina.  Knowing  Mr.  Stanley  to  be  an  able  man,  and  not  doubt- 
ing that  he  is  a  patriot,  I  should  be  glad  for  him  to  be  \vith  his 
old  acquaintances  South  of  Virginia,  but  I  am  unable  to  suggest 
anything  definite  upon  the  subject.  A.  Liisrcomsr 

1 ALS,  RPB.  Edward  Stanly,  who  resigned  as  military  governor  of  North 
Carolina  on  January  15,  1863,  and  moved  to  San  Francisco,  telegraphorl  Lin- 
coln on  January  27,  1864:  "I  reed,  the  following  message  from  a  loyal,  well 
informed  man.  *Newburn  igth.  and  New  York  25th.  Jany.  Important  move- 
ments on  foot  in  interior.  Your  friends  want  you  to  come  here.  C.  B.  Dabblee.' 
When  the  Country  needs  my  service  not  as  Governor,  I  am  ready  to  come.*' 
(DLC-RTL). 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir  Washington,  Jan.  28.   1864. 

Col.  Thomas  C.  Devin  represents  that  Robert  Gill,  now  of  Co. 
D.  6th.  N.Y.  Cavalry,  of  which  he  Col.  D.  is  the  Colonel,  is  under 
sentence  of  death  for  desertion  &  that  since  his  desertion,  he  has 
fought  at  Gettysburg  and  in  several  other  battles,  &  has  otherwise 
behaved  well;  and  he  asks  that  said  Gill  may  be  pardoned  and 
sent  to  his  Regiment.  Let  it  be  done.  Yours  truly  A. 


owned  by  Charles  W.   Olsen,  Chicago,   Illinois.    Concerning   Robert 
Coll,  see  Lincoln  to  Meade,  January  25,    1864.   AGO  Special  Orders  No    43 
January  28,  1864,  announced  Gill's  pardon. 

[158] 


To  George  S.  Boutwell1 

Hon.  George  S.  Boutwell  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  January  29,  1864. 

Please  call  and  see  me  this  morning,  and  as  soon  after  receiv- 
ing this  as  convenient.  Yours  truly  A. 


1  ALS,  IHi.  No  clue  has  been  found  as  to  Lincoln's  business  with  Representa- 
tive Boutwell. 


To  Henry  W.  Halleck1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major  General  Halleck,  January  29,  1864. 

The  New  Mexico  people  here  understand  that  Gen.  Joseph  R. 
West,  has  asked  to  be  relieved  of  his  command  in  that  part  of  the 
country;  and  they  say  they  are  for  his  being  relieved.  Let  it  be 
done  unless  you  know  some  reason  to  the  contrary.  Yours  truly, 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Thomas  F.  Madigan,  A  Catalogue  of  Lincolniana  (1929),  p.  28.  AGO 
Special  Orders  No.  49,  February  i,  1864,  relieved  Joseph  R.  West  from  duty 
in  the  Department  of  New  Mexico  and  directed  him  to  report  for  duty  in  the 
Department  of  Arkansas. 

Memorandum  : 
Appointment  of  Henry  O.  Ryerson1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  Jan.  29,  1864. 
This  morning  I  am  impressed  with  the  belief  that  the  appointment 
of  Col.  Henry  O.  Ryerson  of  loth.  New-Jersey,  as  a  Brig.  Genl. 
would  be,  perhaps  the  best  that  can  be  made  for  the  State.  He  has 
been  in  the  war  almost  or  quite  from  the  beginning;  and  has  been 
severely  wounded,  having  been  in  nearly  all  the  battles  of  the  A.P. 

A.  LINCOLN 

iADS,  IHi.  No  appointment  is  of  record.  Ryerson  died  on  May  12,  1864, 
of  wounds  received  in  the  Battle  of  the  Wilderness  on  May  6. 

To  John  Sedgwick1 

Major  General  Sedgwick  Executive  Mansion 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington  D.C.  Jan.  29.  1864 

Suspend  execution  of  George  Sowers,  Co.  E.  4th.  Ohio  Vols.  & 
send  record.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  No  reply  has  been  found. 

[159] 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  January  29,  1864 

I  transmit  herewith  a  report  from  the  Secretary  of  State,  in  an- 
swer to  the  resolution  of  the  Senate,  respecting  the  correspondence 
with  the  authorities  of  Great  Britain,  in  relation  to  the  proposed 
pursuit  of  hostile  bands  of  the  Sioux  Indians  into  the  Hudson  Bay 
Territories  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Washington,  29th.  Jany.  1864. 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  FS.  The  enclosures  are  printed  in  Thirty- 
eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  Senate  Executive  Document  No.  13.  After  the 
uprising  in  Minnesota  in  1862,  the  Sioux  Indians  fled  to  the  Red  River  country 
in  Canada.  On  January  21,  1864,  Seward  asked  that  U.S.  troops  be  allowed 
to  pursue  them  or  that  the  British  use  U.S.  troops  to  restrain  them  from  raids 
across  the  border.  Lord  Lyons  replied  on  January  22  that  the  request  had  been 
forwarded  to  London. 

To  Daniel  E.  Sickles1 

Major  General  Sickles  Executive  Mansion, 

New- York:  Washington,  January  29,  1864. 

Could  you,  without  it's  being  inconvenient,  or  disagreeable  to 
yourself,  immediately  take  a  trip  to  Arkansas  for  me? 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1 ALS,  RPB.  General  Sickles  wrote  Lincoln  on  January  27,  1 864,,  that  he 
could  walk  without  crutches  by  use  of  an  artificial  leg  and  was  anxious  for 
duty  (DLC-RTL).  On  January  29  he  replied  to  Lincoln's  telegram,  *4Your 
telegram  received  this  afternoon.  I  am  ready  to  go  at  once.  Shall  I  wait  here 
for  orders  or  proceed  to  Washington?"  (Ibid.).  On  February  2,  he  wrote: 

"Since  replying  to  your  telegram  in  reference  to  Arkansas — to  the  effect  that 
I  was  ready  to  go — I  have  waited  here  for  orders  presuming  that  if  you  wished 
me  to  report  to  you  in  person  in  Washington  your  wish  would  be  made  known 
...  by  telegram  or  letter.  I  write  now  lest  there  might  be  a  different  ex- 
pectation on  your  part. 

"Here  I  am  making  good  use  of  my  time  in  learning  the  use  of  my  arti- 
ficial limb  .  .  .  and  ...  as  soon  as  I  am  advised  that  I  am  fit  for  .  .  .  duty 
will  proceed  to  Washington.  .  .  . 

"My  first  wish  is  to  resume  command  of  my  Corps — next  to  that,  the  com- 
mand of  Washington — but  I  shall  be  entirely  satisfied  to  undertake  any  duty 
which  you  think  I  can  be  most  useful  to  the  Government, — whether  in  the 
field,  or  at  Washington,  Arkansas  or  elsewhere."  (Ibid.). 

See  further,  Lincoln  to  Sickles,  February  10,  infra. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

January  30,  1864 

In   accordance   with   the   recommendation    of    Major    General 
Meade,  the  sentence  of  Capt.  Jesse  Armstrong,  /th  Indiana  Volun- 
teers is  commuted  to  forfeiture  of  one  months  pay  proper. 
Jan.  30,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

[160] 


JANUARY      31,      1864 

1ES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  810.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Jesse  B.  Armstrong,  Com- 
pany K,  Seventh  Indiana  Volunteers,  dismissed  for  conduct  prejudicial  to  good 
order  and  military  discipline  and  conduct  unbecoming  an  officer  and  gentle- 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

January  30,  1864 

In  consideration  of  the  recommendation  made  by  Major  General 
Schofield  and  the  long  period  of  time  this  officer  has  already  been 
under  arrest,  his  sentence  is  hereby  remitted.  A.  LIN-COLIST 

January  30,  1864 

1  ES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  905.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Captain  Samuel  M.  Logan, 
First  Colored  Cavalry,  cashiered  for  violation  of  Fourteenth  and  Fifteenth 
Articles  of  War. 


To  Frederick  Steele1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major  General  Steele  January  30.  1864. 

Since  writing  mine  of  the  27th.  seeing  still  further  accounts  of 
the  action  of  the  convention  in  Arkansas,  induces  me  to  write  you 
yet  again.  They  seem  to  be  doing  so  well,  that  possibly  the  best 
you  can  do  would  be  to  help  them  on  their  own  plan — but  of  this, 
you  must  confer  with  them,  and  be  the  judge.  Of  all  things,  avoid 
if  possible,  a  dividing  into  cliques  among  the  friends  of  the  com- 
mon object.  Be  firm  and  resolute  against  such  as  you  can  perceive 
would  make  confusion  and  division.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  William  W.  Steele,  Pescadero,  California;  ADfS,  DLC- 
RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Steele,  January  20  and  27,  supra, 

To  Nathaniel  P  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major  General  Banks  January  31,  1864. 

Yours  of  the  2 and.  Inst.  is  just  received.  In  the  proclamation  of 
Dec.  8.  and  which  contains  the  oath  that  you  say  some  loyal  peo- 
ple wish  to  avoid  taking,  I  said: 

And2  still  further,  that  this  proclamation  is  intended  to  present  the 
people  of  the  States  wherein  the  national  authority  has  been  sus- 
pended, and  loyal  State  governments  have  been  subverted,  a  mode  in 
and  by  which  the  national  authority  and  loyal  State  governments 
may  be  re-established  within  said  States,  or  in  any  of  them;  and, 

[161] 


JANUARY     31,      1864 

while  the  mode  presented  is  the  best  the  Executive  can  suggest,  with 
his  present  impressions,  it  must  not  be  understood  that  no  other  pos- 
sible mode  would  be  acceptable. 

And  speaking  of  this  in  the  Message,  I  said: 

Saying8  that  reconstruction  will  be  accepted  if  presented  in  a  specified 
way,  it  is  not  said  it  will  never  be  accepted  in  any  other  way. 

These  things  were  put  into  these  documents  on  ptirpose  that  some 
conformity  to  circumstances  should  be  admissable;  and  when  I 
have,  more  than  once,  said  to  you  in  my  letters  that  available  la- 
bor already  done  should  not  be  thrown  away,  I  had  in  my  mind 
the  very  class  of  cases  you  now  mention.  So  you  see  it  is  not  even 
a  modification  of  anything  I  have  heretofore  said  when  I  tell  you 
that  you  are  at  liberty  to  adopt  any  rule  which  shall  admit  to 
vote  any  unquestionably  loyal  free-state  men  and  none  others. 
And  yet  I  do  wish  they  would  all  take  the  oath.  Yours  truly, 

A.  LINCOLN 

*ALS,  IHi;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  On  January  22,  Banks  wrote  Lincoln: 
"It  gives  me  great  pleasure  to  report  the  progress  making  in  the  state  elec- 
tion. All  parties  participate  in  the  selection  of  candidates,  and  a  very  handsome 
vote  will  be  given.  Not  a  word  is  heard  from  any  one  in  favor  of  a  restoration 
of  slavery,  and  no  objection  is  made  to  the  free  state  basis  upon  which  the 
election  is  based.  The  indications  are  very  strong  that  Mr.  Hnhn  will  be 
elected  governor.  By  the  middle  of  April,  you  will  receive  a  full  delegation 
in  both  houses  of  Congress,  composed  not  only  of  loyal  men  hut  earnest  sup- 
porters of  your  administration.  This  will  be  accomplished  in  ninety  days  from 
the  receipt  of  your  letter  embracing  your  instructions  for  a  free  state  organ- 
ization in  the  shortest  possible  time,  and  it  will  give  in  its  results  I  am  sure 
satisfaction  to  the  People.  Officers  selected  will  be  from  the  established  resi- 
dents of  the  state.  The  only  part  I  take  in  the  affair  is  to  discourage  nomina- 
tions from  the  army  of  which  none  will  be  attempted. 

''The  only  ground  of  hesitation  on  the  part  of  the  most  conservative  men 
is  in  regard  to  the  oath  required  which  is  that  of  your  proclamation  of  the 
8th.  December.  Prominent  Union  men,  who  have  never  sympathized  with  or 
aided  the  rebellion  directly  or  indirectly,  .  .  .  who  support  your  administra- 
tion, .  .  .  have  taken  the  oath,  and  complied  with  the  conditions  of  your  proc- 
lamation .  .  ^say,  that  having  been  established  in  their  rights  as  citizens,  and 
voted  in  election  of  members  of  congress  they  ought  not  to  be  compelled  to 
take  an  additional  oath  in  order  to  vote  at  this  election.  The  exception  taken 
refers  ...  to  the  clauses  referring  to  the  laws  of  congress  &c.  relating  to 
slavery  and  the  confiscation  of  property.  There  is  perhaps  a  professional  in- 
terest in  the  case.  Some  of  the  most  prominent  and  steadfast  are  lawyers  of 
high  standing.  They  have  discussed  the  statutes  of  confiscation  in  the  District 
court  here  and  expect  to  argue  their  causes  in  Washington.  They  interpret 
the  oath  so  as  to  forbid  this  exercise  of  their  professional  privileges.  ...  It 
has  seemed  to  me  that  the  oath  prescribed  in  the  late  proclamation  was  in- 
tended to  apply  to  states  in  which  no  elections  have  been  held,  and  that  if  it 
were  so  construed  as  to  allow  loyal  men  to  vote  who  had  qualified  under  the 
conditions  of  the  Proclamation  of  no  harm  could  be  done.  It 

would  not  change  the  results  of  the  election,  but  affect  only  the  aggregate  of 
votes.  .  .  . 

[162] 


FEBRUART      1,      1864 

"You  will  have  heard  of  some  objections  to  the  speedy  organization  of  the 
state  which  I  have  proposed.  It  proceeds  .  .  .  from  those  who  did  not  desire 
an  immediate  restoration  of  the  state  .  .  .  but  the  mass  of  the  people  are  en- 
tirely satisfied.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

2  In  the  ALS  this  passage  is  a  printed  clipping  pasted  on  the  letter. 

3  Ditto. 


To  Thomas  E.  Bramlette1 

Governor  Bramlette  Executive  Mansion. 

Frankfort,  Ky.  Washington,  D.C.  Jan.  31.   1864 

Gen.  Boyles  resignation  is  accepted,  so  that  your  Excellency  can 
give  him  the  appointment  proposed.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  January  11,  supra.  On  January  30, 
Governor  Bramlette  telegraphed  Lincoln:  "Has  Brig  Genl  Boyles  resignation 
been  accepted.  If  so  I  wish  to  give  him  an  appointment.  Answer."  (DLC-RTL) . 
Boyle's  resignation  took  effect  on  January  26.  Afterwards  he  helped  organize 
the  Louisville  City  Railroad  and  became  president  of  the  company. 


To  John  A.  Dix1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major-General  Dix,  New  York:  February  i,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  Frank  W.  Parker,  of  one 
of  the  Maine  regiments,  sentenced  to  be  shot  for  desertion  on  the 
5th  instant,  and  forward  record  for  examination.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

i  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  414.  No  reply  has  been  found.  Lincoln  returned 
the  record  in  the  case  to  Judge  Advocate  General  Holt  on  April  16,  1864, 
under  the  order  of  February  26,  infra  (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate 
General,  NN  802). 


To  Caleb  Lyon1 

Hon.  Caleb  Lyon  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  February  i,  1864 

Gov.  Wallace  of  Idaho  is  very  anxious  for  a  different  man  to  be 
appointed  Gov.  of  that  Territory.  I  told  him  my  promise  to  you 
was  absolute,  but  if  he  could  persuade  you  out  of  it,  all  right,  but 
that  I  should  keep  my  word  with  you.  See  the  Governor,  and  then 
call  and  see  me.  Yours  truly  A. 

[163] 


FEBRUARY      1,      1864 

1ALS  THaroL  No  reply  has  been  found,  but  ex-congressman  Lyon  was 
appointed  to  succeed  William  H.  Wallace.  See  Lincoln  to  Seward,  February  2, 
infra. 

Order  for  Draft  of  500,000  Men1 

Executive  Mansion 
Ordered:  February  ist.   1864. 

That  a  draft  for  five  hundred  thousand  men  to  serve  for  three 
years  or  during  the  war,  be  made  on  the  tenth  day  of  March  next, 
for  the  military  service  of  the  United  States,  crediting  and  dedxict- 
ing  therefrom,  so  many  as  may  have  been  enlisted  or  drafted  into 
the  service  prior  to  the  first  day  of  March,  and  not  heretofore 
credited.  ABRAHAM: 


*  DS,  owned  by  Harry  MacNeill  Bland,  New  York  City.  The  original  order- 
is  in  the  hand  of  a  clerk  with  emendations  by  Stanton  and  signed  by  Lincoln. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Executive  Mansion,  February  i,  1864. 

Sir:  You  are  directed  to  have  a  transport  (either  a  steam  or  sail- 
ing vessel  as  may  be  deemed  proper  by  the  Quartermaster-Gen- 
eral) sent  to  the  colored  colony  established  by  the  United  States  at 
the  island  of  Vache,  on  the  coast  of  San  Domingo,  to  bring  back  to 
this  country  such  of  the  colonists  there  as  desire  to  return.  You 
will  have  the  transport  furnished  with  suitable  supplies  for  that 
purpose,  and  detail  an  officer  of  the  Quartermaster's  Department 
who,  tinder  special  instructions  to  be  given,  shall  have  charge  of 
the  business.  The  colonists  will  be  brought  to  Washington,  xxnless 
otherwise  hereafter  directed,  and  be  employed  and  provided  for 
at  the  camps  for  colored  persons  around  that  city.  Those  only 
will  be  brought  from  the  island  who  desire  to  return,  and  their 
effects  will  be  brought  with  them.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

1  OR>  m>  IV,  75.  This  order  was  enclosed  by  Stanton  to  Meigs  on  February 
3,  1864.  On  February  4,  Meigs  reported  to  Stanton: 

"The  ship  Maria  L.  Day  has  been  chartered  in  the  port  of  New  York.  She 
is  being  fitted,  victualed,  and  watered  as  for  a  voyage  to  Aspinwall  by  the 
Windward  Passage,  to  bring  to  Boston  500  troops. 

"I  have  directed  Major  Van  Vliet,  quartermaster  at  New  York,  to  hold  the 
ship  ready  to  take  on  board  the  officer  who  may  be  designated  to  go  in  her, 
and  to  obey  his  orders  to  stop  at  any  other  port  than  Aspinwall,  and  to  pro- 
ceed in  any  direction  he  may  order. 

"I  respectfully  name  Edward  L.  Hartz,  assistant  quartermaster,  U.S.  Army, 
as^the  officer  to  receive  the  special  instructions.  .  .  . 

"I  propose  to  order  Captain  Hartz  to  proceed  at  once  to  New  York  to  re- 
port to  Major  Van  Vliet  and  receive  from  him  the  charge  of  the  ship.  . 

[164] 


FEBRUARY      2,      ±864 

"I  respectfully  suggest  the  propriety  of  ordering  an  assistant  surgeon  and  a 
guard  of  a  subaltern  and  twenty  men  and  non-commissioned  officers  of  the 
Invalid  Corps  to  proceed  on  the  ship.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.,  p.  76). 

Concerning  the  colonization  of  Isle  A'Vache  see  Lincoln  to  Seward,  January 
6,  1863,  and  the  proclamation  of  April  16,  1863,  supra. 

To  Kamehameha  V1 

To  His  Majesty  Kamehameha,  V,  February  2,  1864 

King  of  the  Hawaiian  Islands. 

Great  and  Good  Friend:  I  have  read  -with  feelings  of  profound 
sorrow  your  Majesty's  letter  of  the  5th.  December  last  announc- 
ing the  death  on  the  soth.  of  the  preceding  month,  of  His  Majesty, 
your  Brother,  Kamehameha  IV,  and  conveying  also  the  pleasing 
intelligence  of  your  Majesty's  constitutional  succession  to  the 
Throne  of  the  Hawaiian  Kingdom. 

Your  Majesty's  anticipations  of  sympathy  from  me  in  the  double 
bereavement  which  you  have  experienced  in  the  decease  of  your 
Sovereign  and  Brother  are  fully  realized.  Not  only  I,  but  the  whole 
American  People  are  deeply  moved  by  the  intelligence  of  the 
event  with  which  God  in  His  infinite  wisdom  has  afflicted  your 
Majesty  and  the  Hawaiian  nation;  for  whom  this  Government 
and  people  have  ever  entertained  sentiments  of  almost  paternal 
regard,  as  well  as  of  sincere  friendship  and  unchanging  interest. 

It  is  gratifying  to  know  that  His  Majesty's  place  on  the  Throne 
and  in  the  hearts  of  the  Hawaiian  people  is  occupied  by  one  who 
was  allied  to  him  by  the  closest  ties  of  blood,  and  by  a  long  partic- 
ipation in  the  affairs  of  the  Kingdom.  These  influences,  controlled 
by  the  Supreme  Ruler  of  the  Universe  whose  guidance  your  Maj- 
esty invokes,  and  by  those  aspirations  which  your  Majesty  cher- 
ishes for  the  good  of  your  subjects,  cannot  fail  to  assure  the  well- 
being  and  prosperity  of  the  Hawaiian  Kingdom. 

Your  Majesty  may  ever  firmly  rely  upon  my  sincere  sympathy 
and  cordial  support  and  upon  the  abiding  friendship  of  the  people 
of  the  United  States  in  the  execution  of  the  lofty  mission  entrusted 
to  you  by  Providence. 

Commending  your  Majesty,  and  the  bereaved  Widow  and  Peo- 
ple of  the  late  King  to  the  Fatherly  protection  and  comfort  of  the 
Almighty,  I  remain  Your  Majesty's  Good  Friend, 

By  the  President:  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD,  Secretary  of  State. 

Washington,  February  2d.  1864. 

1  Copy,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Communications  to  Foreign  Sovereigns  and  States, 
III,  211-12. 

[165] 


Order  Approving  Regulations  of  Trade1 

Executive  Mansion 
Washington,  February  2,  1864. 

I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President  of  the  United  States,  having  seen 
and  considered  the  Additional  Regulation  of  Trade  prescribed  by 
the  Secretary  of  the  Treasury,  and  numberd  LVII,  do  hereby  ap- 
prove the  same.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

l  Additional  Regulations  Concerning  Commercial  Intercourse  with  and  in 
States  Declared  in  Insurrection,  January  26,  1864.  Additional  Regulation  LVII 
modified  the  Twenty-sixth  Regulation  established  on  September  11,  1863,  in 
so  far  as  to  annul  restrictions  on  trade  in  the  State  of  West  Virginia  within 
the  Union  lines,  with  the  exception  that  no  products  could  be  shipped  into 
any  state  in  insurrection.  See  Lincoln's  orders  of  January  26,  supra,  and  May 
20,  infra. 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  State,  Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Sir:  Washington,  Feb.  2,  1864. 

Please  send  me  a  nomination  for  Hon.  Caleb  Lyon,  as  Governor 
of  Idaho  Territory.  Yours  truly,  A.  LiisrcoLisr. 

1  Thomas  F.  Madigan,  A  Catalogue  of  Lincolniana  (1929),  p.  28,  See  Lin- 
coln to  Lyon,  February  i,  supra.  Lyon's  nomination  went  to  the  Senate  on 
February  2,  and  was  confirmed  on  February  26,  1864.  See  Lincoln  to  Roscoe 
Conkling,  February  19,  infra. 

To  Charles  A.  Dana1 

[Febrxiary  3,  1864] 

Will  Mr.  Dana  please  see  and  hear  this  man  and  do  the  best  for 
him  he  can?  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Personnel  Appointments,  Box 
29.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Francis  S.  Macnamara, 
Washington,  D.C.,  February  3,  1864,  reminding  the  president  of  a  promise 
made  at  Judiciary  Square  Hospital  after  the  Seven  Days  Battle,  to  give  him 
an  appointment.  F.  G.  McNamara,  listed  in  the  U.S.  Official  Register,  1865,  as 
a  clerk  in  the  pay  department,  may  or  may  not  be  the  same  man. 

Endorsement1 

Upon  the  refunding  all  bounties  and  other  expenses,  let  this  boy 
be  discharged.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  3.  1864 

1AES,  owned  by  Mrs.  Ethel  M.  Nauman,  Baltimore,  Maryland.  The  en- 
dorsement has  been  removed  from  attendant  papers  and  cannot  be  further 
identified. 

[166] 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington, 

Judge  Advocate  General  Feb.  3.  1864 

Please  obtain  the  record,  examine  &  report  upon  it,  in  the  case 

of  Yocum,  mentioned  in  the  accompanying  letter.  Yours 

truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1217.  William 
Yocum,  employee  in  charge  of  contrabands  at  Cairo,  Illinois,  had  been  sen- 
tenced to  five  years  at  hard  labor  for  aiding  in  kidnapping  employees  of  the 
U.S.  See  Lincoln's  endorsements,  January  22,  supra,  and  February  16,  infra. 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  State  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  February  3,  1864. 

Please  see  Hon.  Win.  R.  Morrison,  and  oblige  him  about  the 
pass-ports  for  Mr.  Merrick  if  you  consistently  can.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  Merrick  has  not  been  positively  identified,  but  as  a  guess,  Dem- 
ocratic Representative  William  R.  Morrison  may  have  sought  passports  for 
Democrat  Richard  T.  Merrick  of  Chicago,  who  moved  to  Washington  in  1864. 

To  Richard  Yates1 

Gov.  Yates  Executive  Mansion, 

Springfield,  Ills.  Washington,  Feb.  3,  1864. 

The  U.S.  government  lot  in  Springfield,  can  be  used  for  a  Sol- 
diers Home,  with  the  understanding  that  the  government  does 
not  incur  any  expence  in  the  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Governor  Yates  telegraphed  on  January  28:  "A  Soldier's  home 
is  very  much  needed  here  &  the  San.  Com.  have  donated  two  thousand  dolls, 
for  that  purpose.  Can  the  Commission  have  for  that  purpose  the  use  of  lot 
purchased  of  Maj.  lies  by  the  Govt.  for  Court  house?"  (DLC-RTL). 

The  site  of  the  present  Federal  Building  at  Sixth  and  Monroe  Streets  in 
Springfield  was  the  lot  in  question.  A  frame  building,  with  lounge  and  sleep- 
ing rooms  for  furloughed  soldiers,  was  promptly  erected  after  receipt  of  Lin- 
coln's telegram.  See  Lincoln  to  Woods,  April  25,  infra. 

To  Edward  Everett1 

Executive  Mansion, 
My  dear  Sir  Washington,  February  4,  1864. 

Yours  of  Jan.  3oth.  was  received  four  days  ago;  and  since  then 
the  address  mentioned  has  arrived.  Thank  you  for  it.  I  send  here- 

[167] 


FEBRUARY     4,      1864 

with  the  manuscript  of  my  remarks  at  Gettysburg,  which,  with 
my  note  to  you  of  Nov.  2Oth.  you  are  at  liberty  to  use  for  the 
benefit  of  our  soldiers  as  you  have  requested.  Yours  very  truly 

Hon.  Edward  Everett.  A.  LINCOLN. 

i  ALS,  MHi;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  Edward  Everett  wrote  on  January  30: 

"I  shall  have  the  honor  of  forwarding  to  you  by  Express  ...  a  copy  of  the 
Authorized  E'dition  of  my  Gettysburg  Address  &  of  the  Remarks  made  by  your- 
self, &  the  other  matters  connected  with  the  Ceremonial  of  the  Dedication  of 
the 'Cemetery.  It  appeared,  owing  to  unavoidable  delays,  only  yesterday. 

"I  have  promised  to  give  the  Manuscript  of  my  address  to  Mrs.  Governor 
[Hamilton]  Fish  of  New-York,  who  is  at  the  head  of  the  Ladies'  Committee 
of  the  Metropolitan  fair.  It  would  add  very  greatly  to  its  value,  if  I  could 
bind  up  with  it  the  manuscript  of  your  dedicatory  Remarks,  if  you  happen 
to  have  preserved  them. 

"I  would  further  venture  to  request,  that  you  would  allow  me  also  to  bind 
up  in  the  volume  the  very  obliging  letter  of  the  20  Nov.  '63,  which  you  did 
me  the  favor  to  write  to  me  ....  as  its  insertion  would  greatly  enhance  the 
value  of  the  volume.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

The  manuscript  of  Lincoln's  letter  of  November  20  was  not  bound  up  with 
the  manuscripts  of  the  two  addresses  as  proposed,  but  is  in  the  Everett  Papers 
at  the  Massachusetts  Historical  Society.  The  manuscript  address  which  Lin- 
coln enclosed  on  February  4,  known  as  "the  Everett  Copy,"  was  probably  pre- 
pared in  November,  1863,  shortly  after  the  ceremony.  See  the  notes  to  the 
Gettysburg  Address,  November  19,  1863,  supra. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

If  the  Judge  Advocate  General  has  made  report  as  within   in- 
dicated, please  send  me  the  report  and  record.  A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  4.  1864. 

1  AES,  OFH.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Richard  M. 
Corwine,  February  4,  1864,  asking  the  president  to  review  the  case  of  E.  A. 
Smith,  convicted  of  fraud  against  the  government.  See  Lincoln  to  Eastman, 
November  24,  1863,  supra,  and  to  Corwine,  March  30,  infra. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate:  February  4,  1864 

In  compliance  with  the  Resolution  of  the  Senate  of  the  26th 
ultimo,  requesting  "a  copy  of  all  the  correspondence  between  the 
authorities  of  the  United  States  and  the  Rebel  authorities  on  the 
exchange  of  prisoners,  and  the  different  propositions  connected 
with  that  subject,"  I  transmit  herewith  a  report  from  the  Secre- 
tary of  War,  and  the  papers  with  which  it  is  accompanied. 

Washington,  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

February  4,  1864. 

IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38 A  F2.  Stanton's  report  of  February  4  with  en- 
closures is  printed  in  Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  Senate  Executive 
Document  No.  17. 

[168] 


To  Green  Adams1 

February  5,  1864 

You  see  the  ladys  name  is  not  given  in  this  letter.  Judge  Adams, 
may,  in  his  discretion,  send  the  enclosed  card — blank  to  be  filled 
by  who  can.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  5,  1864 

1AES,  owned  by  John  S.  Adams,  Sr.,  Wayne,  Pennsylvania.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  letter  of  Hiram  Shaw,  Jr.,  Lexington,  Kentucky,  to 
Green  Adams,  January  27,  1864,  asking  a  pass  for  his  sister  in  Macon,  Georgia, 
"allowing  her  to  come,  with  her  two  small  children"  A  note,  not  by  Lincoln, 
Shaw,  or  Adams,  is  written  on  the  top  of  the  letter:  "Sent  pass  in  letter  Feb. 
6.  1864," 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States.  February  5,  1864 

In  answer  to  the  Resolution  of  the  Senate  of  yesterday  on  the 
subject  of  a  Reciprocity  Treaty  with  the  Sandwich  Islands,  I  trans- 
mit a  Report  from  the  Secretary  of  State,  to  whom  the  Resolution 
was  referred.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Washington,  5  February  1864. 

*  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  FS.  Seward's  report  of  February  5  indicated 
that  "application  has  been  made  for  a  revival  of  a  similar  treaty  which  was 
negotiated  here  during  the  administration  of  President  Pierce,  but  which  was 
not  approved  by  the  Senate.  After  due  consideration,  however,  especially  in 
connexion  with  the  probable  effect  of  such  a  measure  on  the  public  revenue 
at  this  juncture,  it  has  not  been  deemed  advisable  further  to  entertain  the 
subject.  It  is  not  deemed  expedient  at  present  to  communicate  the  correspond- 
ence called  for  by  the  resolution.  .  .  ."  (Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session, 
Senate  Executive  Document  No.  16). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

February  5,  1864 

Submitted  to  the  Sec.  of  War.  On  principle  I  dislike  an  oath  which 
requires  a  man  to  swear  he  has  not  done  wrong.  It  rejects  the 
Christian  principle  of  forgiveness  on  terms  of  repentance.  I  think 
it  is  enough  if  the  man  does  no  wrong  hereafter.       A.  LINCOLIST 
Feb.  5.  1864 

1  AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Colonel 
Richard  M.  Edwards,  Fourth  Tennessee  Cavalry,  to  Stanton,  January  29,  1864, 
as  follows: 

"Sir:  Under  authority  of  Gov  Johnson  of  Tennessee  I  have  raised  a  Regi- 
ment of  cavalry  known  as  the  4th  East  Tennessee  cavalry.  I  began  the  organ- 
ization of  the  Regiment  at  Cumberland  Gap  previous  to  receiving  a  copy  of 
the  newly  prescribed  oath  of  office  requiring  persons  to  swear  that  they  have 
'not  sought  nor  accepted  nor  attempted  to  exercise  the  functions  of  any  office 
whatever  under  any  authority  or  pretended  authority  in  hostility  to  the 

[169] 


FEBRUARY      6,      1864 

United  States.'  As  I  had  held  the  position  of  Representative  in  the  state  legis- 
lature of  Tennessee  after  the  so-called  act  of  secession  it  has  been  seriously 
urged  by  some,  that  the  terms  of  the  oath  were  intended  to  debar  all  holding 
state  offices  in  a  seceded  state  as  well  as  those  holding  confederate  offices.  Hence 
desiring  to  be  mustered  in  as  Colonel  of  my  Regiment,  I  desire  a  settlement  of 
the  question  as  to  rny  eligibility  to  that  position 

"About  twenty  other  union  men  served  in  the  same  legislature  with  me  who 
have  maintained  their  positions  as  loyal  men  to  the  present  time.  Some  of  them 
in  fact  like  myself  are  organizing  Regiments  for  our  service,  and  I  suppose 
the  same  question  will  be  presented  in  their  behalf.  The  question  is  one  of 
very  great  importance  to  a  very  large  portion  of  the  loyal  men  of  Tennessee, 
reaching  as  it  does  from  a  constable  or  justice  of  a  civil  district  to  the  Judge 
of  the  supreme  court.  The  Union  men  of  East  Tennessee,  held  nearly  all  the 
state  offices  in  that  section,  maintaining  as  we  all  do,  that  the  state  was  not 
out  of  the  Union;  and  that  only  a  portion  of  her  citizens  were  in  hostility  to 
the  Government.  Nearly  all  those  officers  were  forced  by  the  Rebel  authorities 
to  take  an  oath  'to  support  the  confederate  constitution,  and  the  constitution  of 
Tennessee,'  a  very  extraordinary  oath  considering  the  constitution  of  Ten- 
nessee not  changed  according  to  its  own  provisions,  which  expressly  provides 
that  members  of  the  legislature  &  other  officers  shall  take  an  oath  to  support 
the  constitution  of  the  United  States.  The  two  clauses  of  their  oath,  being  in- 
consistent were  of  course  void.  Further  there  was  no  law  of  Tennessee  requir- 
ing such  an  oath  we  having  succeeded  in  defeating  that  measure  in  the  legis- 
lature. The  oath  then  was  not  only  void  on  account  of  inconsistent  terms,  and 
in  direct  conflict  with  the  provisions  of  our  own  constitution  of  Tennessee,  but 
also  wanting  legal  sanction.  Yet  the  so  called  confederate  Government  through 
their  military  control  of  the  state,  required  all  civil  officers  as  well  as  military 
to  take  said  oath;  in  default  of  which  the  offender  was  forced  off  to  Tuscaloosa, 
there  to  lie  and  sicken  and  die  as  numbers  from  East  Tennessee  have  done,  in 
a  prison,  the  loathsomeness  of  which  was  scarce  equalled  by  the  famous  Black- 
hole  of  Calcutta.  Having  then  held  a  state  office,  in  a  state  not  out  of  the 
Union  (for  if  out  the  doctrine  of  secession  must  be  true  which  we  can  not 
agree  to)  and  having  been  forced  under  military  power  to  take  an  illegal  un- 
constitutional, void  oath,  am  I  as  well  as  all  other  state  officers  of  Tennessee 
disqualified  for  holding  a  Federal  office?  Having  raised  a  good  Regiment  many 
of  whom  voted  for  me  for  the  aforesaid  office,  &  now  desire  me  to  lead  them 
I  only  await  a  decision  of  the  above  question  I  am  Very  Respy." 

Charles  A.  Dana  returned  the  letter  to  the  president  on  February  19,  1864, 
with  the  following  conimunication: 

"In  regard  to  the  case  of  R.  M.  Edwards  Colonel  of  the  4th.  Tennessee 
Cavalry  whose  letter,  objecting  to  the  oath  of  allegiance  was  by  you  submitted 
to  the  Secretary  of  War  on  the  5th  instant.  ...  I  am  directed  to  say  that 
the  oath  to  which  Colonel  Edwards  objects  is  verbally  the  same  as  that  pre- 
scribed by  Act  of  Congress  approved  July  2d  1862  to  be  taken  by  'every  per- 
son elected  or  appointed  to  any  office  of  honor  or  profit  under  the  government 
of  the  United  States,  either  in  the  civil,  military  or  naval  departments  of  the 
public  service  excepting  the  President  of  the  United  States.'"  (Ibid.). 

Final  disposition  of  the  problem  has  not  been  learned. 

To  Nathaniel  P.  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Majr.  Gen.  N.  E  Banks:  February  6th,  1864. 

The  bearer,  Gen.  G.  A.  Scroggs,  of  Buffalo,  has  been  appointed 
colonel  of  a  colored  regiment,  and  is  to  report  with  it  to  you  at 

[170] 


FEBRUARY      7,      ±864 

New  Orleans.  The  object  of  moving  in  this  matter  is  to  have  Col. 
Scroggs  sent  by  you,  with  his  regiment,  to  Texas,  charged  to  col- 
lect and  organize  the  colored  men  of  that  State,  it  being  believed 
that  such  a  nucleus  as  this  regiment,  and  such  an  experienced  or- 
ganizer of  troops  as  Col.  Scroggs  has  shown  himself,  will  prove 
highly  successful.  I  hope  this  purpose  will  meet  with  your  ap- 
proval, and  that,  by  such  orders  as  your  judgment  will  dictate, 
you  will  put  Col.  S.  in  the  way  of  executing  his  mission.  Yours 
truly,  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  George  H.  Stowits,  History  of  the  One  Hundredth  Regiment  of  New  York 
Volunteers  (1870),  p.  385.  Brigadier  General  Scroggs  of  the  New  York  Militia 
and  provost  marshal  of  the  Thirtieth  District  of  New  York,  arrived  in  New 
Orleans  on  May  5,  1864,  but  upon  the  withdrawal  of  Union  troops  from  Texas, 
resigned  on  July  6,  1864. 

To  Henry  D.  Terry1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington,  February  6,  1864. 
Commanding  Officer  at  Sandusky,  Ohio: 

Suspend  the  execution  of  death  sentence  of  George  Samuel 
Goodrich,  Jr.,  One  hundred  and  twenty- second  Regiment  New 
York  Volunteers,  and  forward  record  for  examination. 

T*/T    •         T^I    i     __^  A.   LINCOLN. 

Ma)or  Eckert: 

Send  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  415.  No  reply  or  further  reference  has  been  dis- 
covered: Brigadier  General  Henry  D.  Terry  assumed  command  of  the  post  at 
Sandusky  and  Johnson's  Island,  Ohio,  on  January  14,  1864. 

Endorsement:  Release  of  A.  H.  Gray1 

Mr.  Baxter  of  Vermont  is  very  anxious  to  have  the  request  granted 
at  once.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feby  7,  1864 

1  Stan.  V.  Henkels  Catalog  1373,  May  19,  1925,  No.  140.  According  to  the 
catalog  description  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  A.  H.  Gray, 
a  Union  man  impressed  into  service  by  the  Confederates,  asking  for  his  re- 
lease from  prison.  No  further  reference  has  teen  found. 

Endorsement:  Request  of  C.  T.  Benton1 

This  is  the  Canada  lady's  case  about  which  Mr.  Baxter  is  so  anx- 
ious as  I  told  Sec.  of  War.  A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  7.  1864 

[171] 


FEBRUARY     8,      1864 

i  AES,  owned  by  Harold  L.  Watt,  Los  Angeles,  California.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  letter  of  C.  T.  Benton  to  Representative  Portus 
Baxter  of  Vermont,  Rock  Island,  Illinois,  February  2,  1864.  Benton  s  son,  a 
rebel  prisoner  at  Rock  Island,  had  been  in  Kentucky  at  the  outbreak  of  war 
and  "was  caught  there  and  thinking  it  would  be  better  to  enter  as  a  volunteer 
than  as  a  conscript"  had  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  forces.  No  further  refer- 
ence has  been  found. 

To  George  L.  Andrews1 

Executive  Mansion, 

Commanding  Officer,  Portland,  Me.,  Washington, 

care  of  Israel  Washburne,  Jr.:  February  8,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  James  Taylor  until  fur- 
ther orders,  and  forward  record  of  trial  for  examination. 

A.  LINCOLN. 
Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  415.  No  reply  from  Colonel  George  L.  Andrews, 
commanding  officer  at  Portland,  Maine,  has  been  located,  and  James  Taylor 
has  not  been  positively  identified.  The  death  sentence  of  one  James  Taylor,  for 
disloyalty  and  for  being  a  spy,  was  commuted  to  imprisonment  on  recommend- 
ation of  General  Schofield  on  April  27,  1864  (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advo- 
cate General  MM  959),  but  the  James  Taylor  referred  to  in  Lincoln's  tele- 
grams to  Dix  and  Cabot,  February  12,  infra,  was  sentenced  for  desertion.  See 
also  Lincoln  to  Sedgwick,  infra. 

To  John  D.  Defrees1 

Our  own  friends  have  this  under  consideration  now,  and  will  do 
as  much  without  a  Message  as  with  it  A.  L. 

Feb.  8.  1864 

1  AES,  owned  by  F.  L.  Pleadwell,  Honolulu,  Hawaii.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  from  John  D.  Defrees,  February  7,  1864: 

"The  last  Session  of  the  s6th.  Congress  proposed  to  so  amend  the  Constitu- 
tion of  the  U.S.  as  to  prohibit  any  interference  with  slavery,  (by  the  General 
Government)  where  it  then  existed. 

"It  was  disregarded,  and  the  slave  states  resorted  to  war  to  separate  from 
the  free  states. 

"Now,  why  not  send  a  message  to  Congress  recommending  the  passage  of  a 
joint  resolution  proposing  an  amendment  to  the  Constitution  forever  prohibit- 
ing slavery  in  the  States  and  territories? 

"It  would  be  your  measure  and  would  be  passed  by  a  two  thirds  vote,  and, 
eventually,  three  fourths  of  the  states,  through  their  Legislatures,  would  con- 
sent to  it. 

"If  not  done  very  soon  the  proposition  will  be  presented  by  the  Democracy 
and  claimed  by  them  as  their  proposition.  This  may  look  strange  to  those  who 
do  not  remember  with  what  facility  that  party  can  change  front. 

*^Is  it  not  right  in  itself  and  the  best  way  to  end  Slavery! 

*|It  would  have  a  beneficial  influence  on  our  election  next  fall. 

"Those  who  deny  the  justice  of  a   second  term  to  you   are   attempting  to 

[172] 


FEBRUART      8,      1864 

weaken  the  faith  of  the  people  in  your  plan  of  reorganizing  the  state  Govern- 
ments of  the  rebel  states.  They  say,  suppose  a  state  does  so  change  its  consti- 
tution as  to  prohibit  slavery,  why  may  it  not,  in  a  few  years,  hereafter,  change 
back  again? 

"The  proposed  amendment  would  answer  that  cavil. 

"A  single  amendment,  thus  submitted  to  the  Legislatures  of  the  several 
states,  would  not  open  the  whole  constitution  to  amendment — and  no  harm 
can  come  of  it,  even  should  it  fail  to  receive  the  sanction  of  the  constitutional 
number  of  states. 

"If  done,  it  would  be  in  accordance  with  the  mode  provided  by  the  con- 
stitution itself  for  its  amendment — to  which  no  one  could  reasonably  object. 

"Many  reasons  could  be  given  in  its  favor — but  I  only  desire  to  call  your 
attention  to  the  subject,  and  not  to  trouble  you  with  an  argument. 

"Should  you  submit  such  a  proposition  I  think  it  would  be  heartily  endorsed 
by  our  State  Convention  on  the  22d.  inst. 

"I  think  it  a   great  move  on  the  political  chess-board." 

A  joint  resolution  (S.  16),  introduced  by  Senator  John  B.  Henderson  on 
January  11,  1864,  was  amended  and  passed  by  the  Senate  on  April  11.  In  the 
House  it  failed  to  receive  the  necessary  two-thirds  majority  until  January  31, 
1865.  Approved  by  President  Lincoln  on  February  i,  1865,  the  resolution  was 
adopted  by  the  requisite  three-fourths  of  the  states  and  became  the  Thirteenth 
Amendment  to  the  Constitution. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

February  8,  1864 

In  consederation  of  the  recommendation  referred  to,  and  that  the 
party  has  already  suffered  much  he  is  hereby  pardoned  for  the 
rest.  A.  LmcoLixr 

Feb.  8.  1864 

*  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  LL  506.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Private  Michael  Nash, 
Sixty-fifth  Ohio  Volunteers,  sentenced  to  be  shot  for  desertion.  Officers  of  his 
regiment  testified  to  his  good  conduct  and  questioned  the  severity  of  the  pen- 
alty. 

To  Isaac  Murphy1 

Gov.  Isaac  Murphy  Washington,  D.C., 

Little-Rock,  Arkansas  February  8.  1864 

My  order  to  Gen.  Steele  about  an  election  was  made  in  igno- 
rance of  the  action  your  convention  had  taken  or  would  take.  A 
subsequent  letter  directs  Gen.  Steele  to  aid  you  on  your  own  plan, 
and  not  to  thwart  or  hinder  you.  Show  this  to  him. 

A.  LINCOLN*. 

1  ALS,  RPB.  This  telegram  is  misdated  by  Nicolay  and  Hay  "February  6, 
1864"  (NH,  IX,  304).  A  telegram  signed  by  Isaac  Murphy,  William  M.  Fish- 
back,  Lafayette  Gregg,  and  E.  D.  Mayers  was  received  at  7:35  P.M.  on  Febru- 
ary 8:  "We  understand  that  you  have  authorized  Maj  Gen.  Steele  to  order 
an  election  on  the  24th  of  March  as  you  have  doubtless  seen  the  convention 
had  appointed  the  fourteenth  This  call  has  gone  into  parts  of  the  state  to 

[173] 


FEBRUARY     8,      1864 

which  a  new  call  cannot  go  before  the  24th  unless  you  change  to  the  four- 
teenth Neither  election  will  have  one  tenth  Please  change  by  telegraph" 
(DLC-RTL). 

To  John  Sedgwick1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major-General  Sedgwick:  February  8,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  James  Taylor  until  fur- 
ther orders  and  forward  record  of  trial  for  examination. 

A.  LINCOLN. 
Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  above  dispatch.         JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  415.  No  reply  has  been  located.  See  telegrams  to 
Andrews,  supra,  and  to  Dix,  February  12,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Feb.  8,  1864. 

Allow  Gen.  Benham  to  simply  publish  Mr.  Holt's  report  in  his 
case.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  THaroL.  Stanton  endorsed  on  the  bottom  of  the  letter  "Approved  & 
referred  to  the  Adjt  Genl  to  furnish  copy  for  publication.*'  Concerning  General 
Henry  W.  Benham's  case  see  Lincoln  to  Holt,  January  3,  1863,  supra, 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War:  Executive  Mansion- 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington.  Feb.  8.  1864. 

I  saw  Doolittle  and  made  your  views  known  to  him.  He  is  al- 
together tractable  on  the  question  and  thinks  there  is  no  danger  of 
precipitate  action.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Copy,  DLC-RTL.  No  clue  has  been  found  as  to  the  import  of  this  note. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Lieut.  Monroe  is  a  son  of  an  old  friend  of  mine,  and  I  desire  him 
to  have  the  promotion  sought,  if  the  service  admits  of  it. 

Feb.  8,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  Copy,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  of  Brigadier  Gen- 
eral Nathan  Kimball  recommending  First  Lieutenant  George  Monroe  of  the 
Fifty-fourth  Illinois  Volunteers  for  promotion  to  captain  and  assistant  quarter- 
master. George  Monroe,  son  of  Byrd  Monroe  of  Coles  County,  Illinois,  was  ap- 
pointed captain  to  rank  from  September  30,  1864.  The  appointment  was  con- 
firmed by  the  Senate  on  February  ao,  1865. 

[174] 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

Action  to  relieve  in  this  declined         A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  9.  1864 

1AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General  NN  111.  Concerning 
Joseph  M.  Bushfield,  see  Lincoln  to  Holt,  August  28,  1863,  supra,  and  March 
31,  1864,  infra.  Only  one  of  sixty-three  court-martial  cases  reviewed  by  Lin- 
coln on  this  date,  this  one  is  included  because  of  previous  references.  Sentences 
in  other  cases  were  approved,  remitted,  commuted,  or  pardons  were  ordered 
in  routine  endorsements. 


To  John  Brough1 

Gov.  Brough  Washington,  D.C., 

Columbus,  Ohio  Feb.  10  1864 

Robert  Johnson,  mentioned  by  you,  is  hereby  fully  pardoned, 
for  any  supposed  desertion,  up  to  date  A.  LINCOLN 

*ALS,  RPB.  Governor  Brough  telegraphed  on  February  9,  1864:  "Robert 
Johnson  a  private  in  the  ninety  second  regt.  O.V.I,  surrenders  himself  to  me 
as  a  deserter.  The  circumstances  are  peculiar  &  I  respectfully  ask  his  full 
pardon.  Please  send  by  telegraph  as  he  is  now  in  custody.  I  send  papers  by 
mail  showing  an  interesting  case."  (DLC-RTL).  No  further  reference  has 
been  found. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Order  of  dismissal  set  aside,  and  party  to  stand  as  honorably  dis- 
charged. A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  10.  1864 

1AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1214.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  -written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Captain  Conrad  Eber- 
hardt,  First  Battalion,  Pennsylvania  Six-Months  Cavalry,  sentenced  to  be  dis- 
missed for  signing  muster  rolls  containing  false  statements  and  misapplying 
provisions.  The  record  showed  that  Eberhardt  could  not  read  English.  In  ad- 
dition to  the  three  court-martial  endorsements  reproduced  of  this  date  there  are 
forty- three  other  cases  reviewed  by  Lincoln  on  February  10,  bearing  routine 
endorsements  of  pardon,  approval,  remission,  or  commutation  of  sentence. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Dennis  McCarty —  February  10,  1864 

Sentence  of  death  at  Cumberland,  Md. 

Sentence  commuted  to  imprisonment  at  hard  labor  in  the  Peniten- 
tiary for  five  years.  A.  LINCOLN* 
Feb.  10.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  372.  See  Lincoln 
to  Kretz,  October  15,  1863,  supra.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the 

[175] 


FEBRUARY      1  O,      ±864 

sr  ^zfrsti^ 

ution  of  McCaVs  sentence,   to   be    done   at   Albany, 


New  York. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Boy  discharged  and  mustering  officer  rebuked 
Feb'y  10,  1864.  A  LINCOLN 

i  ES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  LL  334-  Lincoln's  endorse- 
ment is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Private  John  S.  Lounsberry, 
Company  I,  Second  U.S.  Artillery,  sentenced  for  desertion.  An  appeal  for 
clemency  sets  forth  that  the  boy  was  a  minor  under  seventeen  years  of  age. 

To  Daniel  Sickles1 

Major  General  Sickles  Washington,  B.C., 

New-York  Feb-   10  1864 

Please  come  on  at  your  earliest  convenience,  prepared  to  make 
the  contemplated  trip  for  me.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  RPB,  ALS.  See  Lincoln  to  Sickles,  January  29,  supra,  and  to  Steele,  Febru- 
ary 11,  to  Sickles,  February  15,  and  to  Steele,  February  25,  infra.  Sickles'  reply 
was  received  at  8  P.M.:  "Your  telegram  reed.  Will  go  on  tomorrow  afternoon.'1 
(DLC-RTL). 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Sec.  of  War,  please  see  Col.  Alger,  who  has  come  up  on  our  in- 
vitation in  regard  to  the  proclamation.  A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  10.  1864 

1ALS,  MiU-C.  Colonel  Russell  A.  Alger,  Fifth  Michigan  Cavalry,  wrote 
Nicolay  on  February  9,  1864: 

"Obeying  your  instructions  of  this  date,  I  have  the  honor  to  submit  the  fol- 
lowing suggestion,  together  with  plan,  of  carrying  into  effect,  the  circulation 
of  the  Presidents  Amnesty  Proclamation  within  the  enemy's  lines. 

"Almost  invariably,  the  first  questions  asked  by  deserters  coming  within 
our  lines,  are,  'What  are  you  going  to  do  with  us?'  'Are  we  to  be  shut  up  in 
prison?'  'Are  we  to  be  pressed  into  your  army?'  &c. 

"This,  they  are  taught  by  their  officers,  will  be,  if  they  desert  to  us. 

"They  also  ask,  'What  privileges  can  we  have,  if  we  take  the  oath.   .   .   .' 

"These  questions  the  Proclamation  does  not  answer  so  plainly  to  all  as  not 
to  admit  of  a  doubt. 

"Could  an  order  be  made,  and  affixed  to  the  Proclamation,  answering  them 
as  far  as  possible.  .  .  . 

"The  plan  I  would  suggest  for  distributing  is:  let  scouts  carry  it  within  the 
Enemy's  lines;  let  Cavalry  expeditions  be  sent  out,  supplied  with  it;  leave 
copies  at  every  house  possible,  and  scatter  wherever  the  enemy  will  be  likely 

[176] 


FEBRUARY      11,      1864 

to  find  it.  ...  Many  will  be  found  by  rebel  soldiers,  and  many  will  be  sent 
to  them  by  mail  from  their  friends.  .  .  . 

"If  a  Reg't  of  Cavalry  can  be  furnished  to  me,  at  different  points  along  the 
enemy  front,  I  will,  if  permitted,  volunteer  to,  as  far  as  is  in  my  power,  see 
this  carried  into  effect  personally."  (DLC-RTL) . 

Edward  D.  Townsend  wrote  Nicolay  on  February  23  that  "Col.  Alger  has 
gone  to  Genl.  Butler's  Department  with  some  of  those  small  print  Proclama- 
tions. .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 


To  Lyman  Trumbull1 

Hon.  Lyman  Trumbull  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Feb.  10,  1864. 

This  morning  I  sent  the  nomination  of  Pieper  to  the 

Senate  for  Assessor  in  the  12th.  District  of  Illinois.  If  you  see  no 
objection,  I  wish  you  would  write  to  Mr.  Flagg,  asking  him  to 
give  Shiel  the  place  Pieper  now  has.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  On  February  12,  1864,  Senator  Trumbull  endorsed  on  the  bot- 
tom of  the  page  to  Willard  C.  Flagg,  collector  of  internal  revenue:  "If  young 
Mr  Schiel  is  competent,  &  qualified  in  all  respects,  I  hope  you  -will  consult 
the  President's  wishes." 

John  Schiel  (Scheil,  Scheel,  or  Schell),  deceased  brother-in-law  of  Gustave 
Koerner,  was  followed  by  Frederick  Pieper  of  Belleville,  Illinois,  as  assessor. 
Presumably  Lincoln's  reference  to  giving  Schiel  the  place  formerly  held  by 
Pieper  meant  Schiel's  son,  Frederick  E.  Schiel,  and  referred  to  a  minor  position 
as  clerk. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Let  a  pardon  be  made  out  in  this  case.          A. 
Feb.  11.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  496.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  from  Judge  A.  B.  Orin,  of  Washington,  D.C.,  February 
10,  1864,  asking  pardon  for  D.  Henry  Burtinett  (Burtnete),  imprisoned  for 
keeping  a  bawdy  house:  "In  consequence  of  his  good  behavior  since  he  has 
been  imprisoned  and  for  other  reasons,  I  ask  his  immediate  and  unconditional 
pardon.  I  presided  at  the  trial  of  his  case  is  the  reason  I  sign  this  application." 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  and  send  me  a  pardon  in  this 
case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  11.  1864. 

1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  envelope  marked  in  a 
different  hand  "James  Speed  asks  pardon  of  Combs."  The  case  has  not  been 
further  identified. 

[177] 


To  Salmon  R  Chase1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Treasury,  please  see  &  hear  my  townsman  &  friend 
Mr.  Van  Duyn.  A-  LINCOLN 

Feb.  11.  1864 

1ALS-P,  ISLA.  Robert  Irwin  of  Springfield  wrote  Lincoln  on  February  6, 
1864,  "The  bearer  Mr.  G.  A.  Van  Duyn,  of  our  city  visits  Washington  to  try 
and  get  a  permit  to  trade  South.  Mr.  Van  Duyn  is  of  the  firm  of  G.  A.  Van 
Duyn  &  Co.  a  House  of  good  standing  here.  (I  have  no  doubt  you  will  recol- 
lect him).  Any  assistance  you  can  render  him  will  be  appreciated  by  Your 
Friend  Robt.  Irwin"  (DLC-RTL). 

Endorsement  Concerning  Pennsylvania  Militia1 

I  fully  indorse  the  within  statement,  and  shall  be  glad  if  Congress 
shall  see  fit  to  act  promptly  in  the  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  11,  1864 

1  Parke-Bernet  Catalog  223,  October  ao-November  i,  194°'  No.  584.  Accord- 
ing to  the  catalog  description,  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from 
Stanton  as  follows:  "The  Department  has  this  day  received  returns  of  the 
amounts  required  for  the  payment  of  the  militia  called  out  for  the  defence  of 
the  State  of  Pennsylvania  on  the  26th  of  June  1863,  against  the  invasion  of 
the  rebel  forces  under  command  of  General  Lee.  There  being  no  appropria- 
tion out  of  which  these  payments  could  be  made  at  the  time  they  were  re- 
quired patriotic  citizens  of  Philadelphia  advanced  the  money,  and  it  is  proper 
that  they  should  be  reimbursed  without  delay.  I  would  respectfully  recom- 
mend therefore  that  an  immediate  appropriation  for  that  purpose  be 
made.  .  .  ."  An  act  approved  April  12,  1866,  appropriated  $800,000  to  reim- 
burse Pennsylvania  for  expenditures  in  payment  of  militia  in  the  U.S.  service. 

To  John  Sedgwick1 

Major  Gen.  Sedgwick  Washington, 

Army  of  Potomac  Feb.  11.  1864 

Unless  there  be  strong  reason  to  the  contrary,  please  send  Gen. 
Kilpatrick  to  us  here,  for  two  or  three  days.  A.  LUNTCOLIST 

1 ALS-P,  ISLA.  General  Sedgwick  replied  to  Lincoln's  telegram  at  9:25  P.M., 
"Gen.  [Judson]  Kilpatrick  has  been  ordered  to  proceed  at  once  to  Washington 
and  report  to  you."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Feb.  11,  1864. 

In  January  1863,  the  Provost-Marshal  at  St.  Louis,  having  taken 
the  control  of  a  certain  church  from  one  set  of  men  and  given  it 
to  another,  I  wrote  Gen.  Curtis  on  the  subject,  as  follows: 

"the  U.S.  Government  must  not,  as  by  this  order,  undertake  to 

[178] 


FEBRUARY      11,      1864 

run  the  churches.  When  an  individual,  in  a  church  or  out  of  it, 
becomes  dangerous  to  the  public  interest,  he  must  be  checked; 
but  the  churches,  as  such,  must  take  care  of  themselves.  It  will  not 
do  for  the  U.S.  to  appoint  trustees.  Supervisors,  or  other  agents  for 
the  churches." 

Some  trouble  remaining  in  this  same  case,  I,  on  the  22nd.  of 
Dec.  1863,  in  a  letter  to  Mr.  O.  D.  Filley,  repeated  the  above  lan- 
guage; and,  among  other  things,  added  "I  have  never  interfered, 
nor  thought  of  interfering  as  to  who  shall  or  shall  not  preach  in 
any  church;  nor  have  I  knowingly,  or  believingly,  tolerated  any 
one  else  to  so  interfere  by  my  authority.  If  any  one  is  so  inter- 
fering by  color  of  my  authority,  I  would  like  to  have  it  specifically 
made  known  to  me.  .  .  ,  I  will  not  have  control  of  any  church  on 
any  side." 

After  having  made  these  declarations  in  good  faith,  and  in  writ- 
ing, you  can  conceive  of  my  embarrassment  at  now  having  brought 
to  me  what  purports  to  be  a  formal  order  of  the  War  Department, 
bearing  date  Nov.  3Oth.  1863,  giving  Bishop  Ames  control  and 
possession  of  all  the  Methodist  churches  in  certain  Southern  Mili- 
tary Departments,  whose  pastors  have  not  been  appointed  by  a 
loyal  Bishop  or  Bishops,  and  ordering  the  Military  to  aid  him 
against  any  resistance  which  may  be  made  to  his  taking  such 
possession  and  control.  What2  is  to  be  done  about  it?  Yours  truly 

A. 


1  ALS,  DLC-Stanton  Papers;  LS  copy,  DLC-RTL.  The  circular  letter  of  No- 
vember 30,  1863,  signed  by  Edward  D.  Townsend  by  order  of  the  Secretary 
of  War,  is  as  follows: 

"To  the  Generals  commanding  the  Departments  of  the  Missouri,  the  Ten- 
nessee, and  the  Gulf,  and  all  Generals  and  officers  commanding  armies,  detach- 
ments, and  posts,  and  all  officers  in  the  service  of  the  United  States  in  the 
above  mentioned  Departments: 

"You  are  hereby  directed  to  place  at  the  disposal  of  Rev.  Bishop  Ames  all 
houses  of  worship  belonging  to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church  South  in  which 
a  loyal  minister,  who  has  been  appointed  by  a  loyal  Bishop  of  said  church,  does 
not  now  officiate. 

"It  is  a  matter  of  great  importance  to  the  Government,  in  its  efforts  to  re- 
store tranquility  to  the  community  and  peace  to  the  nation,  that  Christian 
ministers  should,  by  example  and  precept,  support  and  foster  the  loyal  senti- 
ment of  the  people. 

"Bishop  Ames  enjoys  the  entire  confidence  of  this  Department,  and  no  doubt 
is  entertained  that  all  ministers  who  may  be  appointed  by  him  will  be  entirely 
loyal.  You  are  expected  to  give  him  all  the  aid,  countenance,  and  support  prac- 
ticable in  the  execution  of  his  important  mission. 

"You  are  also  authorized  and  directed  to  furnish  Bishop  Ames  and  his  clerk 
with  transportation  and  subsistence  when  it  can  be  done  without  prejudice  to 
the  service,  and  will  afford  them  courtesy,  assistance  and  protection."  (Edward 
McPherson,  The  Political  History  of  the  United  States  .  .  .  During  the  Great 
Rebellion,  p.  521). 

According  to  McPherson,  the  Reverend  John  Hogan,  acting  for  the  loyal 

[179] 


FEBRUARY      11,      1864 

Methodists  of  Missouri,  brought  the  matter  to  Lincoln's  attention  and  pro- 
cured an  explanatory  order  to  General  William  S.  Rosecrans  from  Townsend 
on  February  13,  as  follows: 

"I  am  directed  by  the  Secretary  of  War  to  say  that  the  orders  from  the 
Department  placing  at  the  disposal  of  the  constituted  Church  authorities  in 
the  Northern  States  houses  of  worship  in  other  States,  is  designed  to  apply  only 
to  such  States  as  are  by  the  President's  Proclamation  designated  as  being  in 
rebellion  and  is  not  designed  to  operate  in  loyal  States,  nor  in  cases  where 
loyal  congregations  in  rebel  States  shall  be  organized  and  worship  upon  the 
terms  prescribed  by  the  President's  Amnesty."  (Ibid.,  p.  523)- 

See  further  Lincoln's  endorsement  to  John  Hogan,  February  13,  infra. 

2  Lincoln  originally  wrote:  "Is  this  supposed  order  genuine?  And  if  so,  what 
is  to  be  done  about  it?"  It  appears  deleted  in  both  the  ALS  and  LS  copy. 


To  John  B.  Steele1 

February  11,  1864 

It  is  not  proposed  to  send  Gen.  Sickles,  with  any  authority  to 
control  Gen.  Steele  in  any  matter;  but  only  to  confer  with  him 
and  give  him  my  views  more  fully  than  I  can  do  by  writing  or 
by  telegraph.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  11,  1864 

1 AES,  owned  by  Frederick  M.  Dearborn,  New  York  City.  Lincoln's  endorse- 
ment is  written  on  the  back  of  a  note  reading  as  follows:  "I  want  to  state  why 
I  think  it  would  not  be  wise  to  send  Gen  Sickles  to  Arkansas — John  B.  Steele." 
See  communications  to  Sickles,  February  10,  supra,  and  February  15,  infra. 
John  B.  Steele  was  the  brother  of  General  Frederick  Steele. 


To  John  P.  Usher1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Interior — Please  see  and  hear  my  friend,  S.  M.  Cul- 
lom.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb  11,  1864 

i  Copy,  ISLA. 


To  Stephen  Cabot1 

Military  Commander  Executive  Mansion 

Boston,  Mass.  Washington  Feb.  12.  1864 

If  there  is  anywhere  in  your  command,  a  man  by  the  name  of 
James  Taylor  under  sentence  of  death  for  desertion,  suspend  exe- 
cution till  further  order  A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  from  Major  Stephen  Cabot,  commanding  at  Fort 
Warren,  Boston,  Massachusetts,  has  been  discovered.  See  Lincoln's  telegram  to 
Andrews,  February  8,  supra,  and  to  Dix,  infra, 

[180] 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  [February  12],  1864. 

I  have  felt  considerable  anxiety  concerning  the  Custom  House 
at  New- York.  Mr.  Barney  has  suffered  no  abatement  of  my  con- 
fidence in  his  honor  and  integrity;  and  yet  I  am  convinced  that 
he  has  ceased  to  be  master  of  his  position.  A  man  by  the  name  of 
Bailey,2  whom  I  am  unconscious  of  ever  having  seen,  or  even 
having  heard  of,  except  in  this  connection,  expects  to  be,  and  even 
now  assumes  to  be,  Collector  de  facto.,  while  Mr.  Barney  remains 
nominally  so.  This  Mr.  Bailey  as  I  understand  having  been  sum- 
moned as  a  witness  to  testify  before  a  committee  of  the  House  of 
Representatives  which  purposed  investigating  the  affairs  of  the 
New- York  Custom-House,  took  occasion  to  call  on  the  Chairman 
in  advance,  and  to  endeavor  to  smother  the  investigation,  saying 
among  other  things,  that  whatever  might  be  developed,  the  Presi- 
dent would  take  no  action,  and  the  committee  would  thereby  be 
placed  unpleasantly.  The  public  interest  can  not  fail  to  suffer  in 
the  hands  of  this  irresponsible  and  unscrupulous  man.8  I  propose 
sending  Mr.  Barney  Minister  to  Portugal,  as  evidence  of  my 
continued  confidence  in  him;  and  I  further  propose  appointing 

4  Collector  of  the  Customs  at  New- York.  I  wrote  the  draft 

of  this  letter  two  weeks  ago,  but  delayed  sending  it  for  a  reason 
which  I  will  state  when  I  see  you.  Yours  truly          A.  LINCOLN 

1  ADf  S,  DLC-RTL.  Although  the  bracketed  portion  of  the  date  does  not  ap- 
pear on  the  draft,  the  envelope  in  which  the  draft  was  filed  bears  Lincoln's 
endorsement  "To  Sec.  of  Treasury.  Feb.  12,  1863."  The  year  date  in  the  en- 
dorsement is  Lincoln's  obvious  error.  Chase  replied  on  February  13,  1864:  "I 
was  surprised  and  pained  by  your  letter  this  morning.  Misrepresentations,  I 
am  sure,  must  have  been  made  to  you  about  the  New  York  Custom  House. 
I  regret  that  I  was  not  earlier  consulted  in  a  matter  which  so  deeply  concerns 
this  Department  &  still  trust,  that  before  you  take  any  definitive  action,  you 
will  confer  with  me  fully  on  the  subject.  I  shall  be  ready  at  any  hour  which 
may  suit  your  convenience."  (DLC-RTL).  See  further  letters  to  Chase,  Feb- 
ruary 13,  15,  20,  and  25,  infra. 

2J.  F.  Bailey,  special  agent  of  the  Treasury  at  New  York. 

3  The  following  sentence  was  deleted  by  Lincoln  at  this  point:  "This  can 
go  no  further."  4  "Hon.  Preston  King"  was  deleted  by  Lincoln. 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Executive  Mansion, 
To  the  Secretary  of  War  [szc].  Washington,  Feby  12,  1864. 

Dear  Sir:  Herewith  is  the  resignation  of  Mr.  McElroth  [sz'c],  as 
General  Appraiser  at  New  York.  Send  me  a  nomination  for  James 

[181] 


FEBRUARY      12,      1864 

Freeland  as  his  successor  unless  you  know  some  reason  to  the  con- 
trary. Yours  truly,  A-  LINCOU* 

ES.  The  recommendations  of  Mr.  Freeland  which  seem  good 
and  ample  are  herewith.  A.  L. 

1  Tracy,  p.  238.  The  source  is  obviously  in  error  in  giving  this  letter  as  "To 
the  Secretary  of  War."  Thomas  McElrath  was  succeeded  by  John  T.  Hoge- 
boom,  not  by  James  Freeland,  but  no  reply  from  Chase  (or  Stanton)  has  been 
discovered. 


To  John  A.  Dix1 

Major  Gen.  Dix  Executive  Mansion, 

New- York  Washington,  Feb.  12,  1864. 

If  there  is  anywhere  in  your  command,  a  man  by  the  name  of 
James  Taylor  under  sentence  of  death  for  desertion,  suspend  exe- 
cution till  further  order.  A  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  has  been  discovered.  See  the  telegrams  to  Andrews 
and  Sedgwick,  February  8,  supra.  In  this  telegram  and  the  one  to  Cabot,  supra, 
the  specification  "for  desertion"  further  complicates  the  identification  of  Tay- 
lor. No  such  case  has  been  discovered. 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Executive  Mansion,   Washington, 
Hon.  Secretary  of  Treasury:  February  13,   1864. 

My  dear  Sir:  On  coming  up  from  the  reception,  I  found  your 
note  of  to-day.  I  am  unwell,  even  now,  and  shall  be  worse  this 
afternoon.  If  you  please,  we  will  have  an  interview  Monday. 
Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLINT 

1  Robert  B.  Warden,  Account  of  the  Private  Life  and  Public  Services  of  Sal- 
mon Portland  Chase  (1874),  p.  572.  See  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  12,  supra, 
and  February  15,  infra. 


Endorsement  to  John  Hogan1 

February  13,  1864 

Indorsed  on  the  modifying  Methodist  order  &  sent  to  Rev  John 
Hogan. 

"As  you  see  within,  the  Secretary  of  War  modifies  his  order  so 
as  to  exempt  Missouri  from  it.  Kentucky  was  never  within  it;  nor, 
as  I  learn  from  the  Secretary,  was  it  ever  intended  for  any  more 

[182] 


FEBRUARY      13,      ±864 

than  a  means  of  rallying  the  Methodist  people  in  favor  of  the 
Union,  in  localities  where  the  rebellion  had  disorganized  and  scat- 
tered them.  Even  in  that  view,  I  fear  it  is  liable  to  some  abuses, 
but  it  is  not  quite  easy  to  withdraw  it  entirely,  and  at  once. 
["]Feb.  13.  1864  A.  LINCOLN ["] 

1  ADS,  DLC-RTL.  The  original  endorsement  written  on  an  order  of  Febru- 
ary 13  has  not  been  discovered,  and  there  is  some  question  as  to  the  precise 
document  which  Lincoln  endorsed  and  gave  to  Hogan.  On  February  28  Gen- 
eral Rosecrans  notified  Stanton  as  follows: 

"On  the  i2th  of  the  present  month  the  Rev.  Bishop  Ames  presented  at  these 
headquarters  a  circular  letter  from  War  Department,  dated  November  30,  1863, 
copy  of  which  is  hereto  annexed,  marked  A,  directing  that —  'All  houses  of 
worship  belonging  to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church  South,  in  which  a  loyal 
minister  appointed  by  a  loyal  bishop  of  said  church  does  not  now  officiate,  are 
placed  at  the  disposal  of  the  Right  Rev.  Bishop  Ames — '  and  asked  that  an 
order  be  issued  in  conformity  thereto.  I  immediately  issued  a  circular  to  com- 
manding officers  of  troops  of  the  department  .  .  .  directing  that  'they  furnish 
Bishop  Ames  every  facility  and  assistance  compatible  with  the  interests  of 
the  service'  under  the  order  mentioned.  Saturday,  Mr.  John  Hogan  called  with 
a  letter  dated  February  13,  1864  (copy  inclosed,  marked  C),  bearing  the  offi- 
cial signature  of  James  A.  Hardie  .  .  .  directed  to  Major-General  Rosecrans 
.  .  .  with  an  indorsement  in  the  handwriting  and  bearing  the  signature  of 
the  President  .  .  .  intended,  as  he  (Hogan)  claimed,  to  abrogate  entirely  in 
this  State  the  circular  order  printed  by  Bishop  Ames.  As  no  official  copy  of 
the  letter  to  me  of  the  ±3th  .  .  .  has  been  received  .  .  .  and  as  there  is  a 
doubt  in  my  mind  as  to  the  policy  the  War  Department  intends  to  adopt  as 
regards  church  property  in  this  State  ...  I  would  respectfully  request  that 
more  definite  instructions  be  furnished.  .  .  ."  (OR,  I,  XXXIV,  II,  452-53). 

A  footnote  in  the  source  states  that  neither  the  order  of  November  30,  1863, 
nor  the  letter  from  Hardie  of  February  13,  1864,  could  be  found  at  the  time 
the  Official  Records  were  compiled.  As  given  by  McPherson  (see  note  to  Lin- 
coln's letter  to  Stanton,  February  11,  supra) ,  both  the  order  of  November  30 
and  the  modifying  order  of  February  13,  were  issued  over  the  signature  of 
Edward  D.  Townsend  rather  than  that  of  James  A.  Hardie.  It  seems  probable, 
however,  from  the  contents  of  Lincoln's  endorsement,  that  the  order  was 
substantially  the  same. 


To  Horace  Maynard1 

Hon.  Horace  Maynard  Executive  Mansion 

Nashville,  Tenn.  Washington,  Feb.  13.   1864 

Your  letter  of  and.  received.  Of  course  Gov.  Johnson  will  pro- 
ceed with  re-organization  as  the  exigencies  of  the  case  appear  to 
him  to  require.  I  do  not  apprehend  he  will  think  it  necessary  to 
deviate  from  my  views  to  any  ruinous  extent.  On  one  hasty  read- 
ing, I  see  no  such  deviation  in  his  programme  which  you  send 

A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  On  February  2,  Tennessee's  Attorney  General  Maynard  wrote 
Lincoln: 

"In  the  first  interview  I  had  the  honor  to  hold  with  your  Excellency,  during 

[183] 


FEBRUARY      14?      1864 

my  recent  visit  to  Washington,  I  informed  you  feat  during ^t^  brief  inte^al 
between  the  arrival  here  of  your  Proclamation  of  Deer.  8,  &  my  departure,  I 
had  heard  two  criticisms  .  .  . 

"i.  Its  excessive  liberality  to  rebels. 

"2.  Its  placing  in  the  same  category  repentant  rebels  &  men  always  loyal. 

"Since  nay  return  I  found  the  same  criticisms  .  .  .  especially  the  latter.  .  .  . 
The  expressions  of  repugnance  are  too  strong  to  be  disregarded. 

"Gov  Johnson  has  attempted,  in  solution  of  the  difficulty,  in  a  manner  quite 
satisfactory  to  the  Union  men,  but  greatly  to  the  disgust  of  secesh  &  semi- 
secesh.  I  will  enclose  you  a  copy  of  his  Proclamation  for  our  March  election. 
In  all  probability  you  will  be  solicited  to  interfere.  This  I  hope  you  ivill  not 
do."  (DLC-RTL). 


Pass  for  Mrs.  Samuel  P.  Hamilton1 

Allow  this  lady  to  pass  to  Nashville  Tenn.  to  report  to  Gov.  John- 
son, and  be  heard  by  him  &  be  disposed  of  as  he  shall  decide. 
[Feby]  14,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1AES-F,  Louisville,  Kentucky,  Times,  February  12,  1945-  The  facsimile 
shows  the  month  blotted,  but  seems  to  read  "Feby."  According  to  the  account 
given  in  the  source,  Mrs.  Samuel  P.  Hamilton  had  been  dispossessed  of  her 
home  for  refusing  to  give  up  a  Confederate  flag  which  she  had  flown  from 
her  roof  during  the  occupation  of  Knoxville  by  Federal  forces  in  September, 
1863. 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  Treasury:  February  15,  1864 

My  Dear  Sir:  I  have  just  called  to  see  you  on  the  matter  men- 
tioned Saturday,  and  am  pained  to  learn  you  are  suffering  too 
much  to  be  out.  I  hope  you  will  soon  be  relieved;  meanwhile,  have 
no  uneasiness  as  to  the  thing  to  which  I  am  alluding,  as  I  shall 
do  nothing  in  it  until  I  shall  [have]  fully  conferred  with  you. 
Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Robert  B.  Warden,  Account  of  the  Private  Life  and  Public  Services  of  Sal- 
mon Portland  Chase  (1874),  p.  573.  See  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  12  and  13, 
supra.  Chase  replied  on  February  15: 

"I  thank  you  for  your  very  kind  note  &  the  assurance  it  contains. 

"I  was  coming  to  see  you  this  morning;  for  really  I  do  not  suffer  at  all.  My 
right  eye  won't  bear  much  light;  but  I  can  get  on  pretty  well  with  the  left. 
So  I  could  come  with  no  other  inconvenience  than  having  one  eye  under 
bandage.  With  the  permission  of  your  note,  however,  I  will  wait  till  tomor- 
row." (DLC-RTL). 

On  February  18,  Chase  wrote  again:  "My  eye  is  so  much  better  that  I  was 
able  to  do  a  little  work  at  the  Department  yesterday,  and  am  here  again  this 
afternoon.  Whenever  you  summon  me  I  shall  attend  you  for  conference  about 
New  York  matters  or  any  other."  (Ibid}. 

See  further  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  20  and  25,  infra. 

[184] 


To  Daniel  E.  Sickles1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major  General  Sickles:  February  15.  1864. 

I  wish  you  to  make  a  tour  for  me  (principally  for  observation 
and  information)  by  way  of  Cairo  and  New-Orleans,  and  return- 
ing by  the  Gulf  and  Ocean.  All  Military  and  Naval  officers  are  to 
facilitate  you  with  suitable  transportation,  and  by  conferring  with 
you,  and  imparting,  so  far  as  they  can,  the  information  herein 
indicated,  but  you  are  not  to  command  any  of  them.  You  will  call 
at  Memphis,  Helena,  Vicksburg,  New-Orleans,  Pensacola,  Key- 
West,  Charleston-Harbor,  and  such  intermediate  points  as  you 
may  think  important.  Please  ascertain  at  each  place  what  is  being 
done,  if  anything,  for  reconstruction  —  how  the  Amnesty  procla- 
mation works,  if  at  all  —  what  practical  hitches,  if  any,  there  are 
about  it  —  whether  deserters  come  in  from  the  enemy,  what  num- 
ber has  come  in  at  each  point  since  the  Amnesty,  and  whether  the 
ratio  of  their  arrival  is  any  greater  since  than  before  the  Amnesty 
—  what  deserters  report  generally,  and  particularly,  whether,  and 
to  what  extent,  the  Amnesty  is  known  within  the  rebel  lines.  Also 
learn  what  you  can  as  to  the  colored  people  —  how  they  get  along 
as  soldiers,  as  laborers  in  our  service,  on  leased  plantations,  and 
as  hired  laborers  with  their  old  masters,  if  there  be  such  cases. 
Also  learn  what  you  can  about  the  colored  people  within  the  rebel 
lines.  Also  get  any  other  information  you  may  consider  interest- 
ing, and,  from  time  to  time,  send  me  what  you  may  deem  im- 
portant to  be  known  here  at  once,  and  be  ready  to  make  a  general 
report  on  your  return.  Yours  truly  A. 


1  ALS-P,  ISLA;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Steele,  February  11,  supra, 
and  February  25,  infra. 

To  John  M.  Thayer1 

Gen.  Thayer  Washington,  B.C., 

Fort  Smith,  Arkansas  Feb.  15.  1864 

Yours  received.  Whatever  of  conflict  there  is  between  the  con- 
vention and  me  is  accidental,  not  designed,  I  having  acted  in 
ignorance  that  the  convention  would  act.  I  yield  to  the  convention, 
and  have  so  notified  Gen.  Steele,  who  is  master,  and  is  to  cut  any 
knots  which  can  not  be  untied.  Correspond  with  him. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  General  Thayer,  in  command  at  Fort  Smith,  Arkansas,  tele- 
graphed on  February  14:  "The  state  convention  which  formed  a  free  constitu- 

[185] 


FEBRUARY      1  6,      1864 

tion  for  Arkansas  appointed  a  General  Election  on  the  fourteenth  of  March 
next  The  people  of  Western  Arkansas  respectfully  request  you  to  modify  your 
order,  so  as  to  have  the  election  on  the  fourteenth,  for  the  reason  that  notice 
has  been  circulated,  through  Arkansas  that,  it  will  be  held  on  that  day  They 
desire  to  know,  at  the  earliest  moment  if  you  make  the  change.  (JJ1A.-.KI  JL). 
See  Lincoln  to  Murphy,  February  8,  supra,  and  to  Steele,  February  17,  infra. 

To  Nathaniel  E  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Major  General  Banks.  February  16,  1864. 

Mrs.  J.  Q.  A.  Fellows  has  come  all  the  way  here  to  make  com- 
plaint about  a  certain  dwelling  house  from  which  she  says  she 
has  been  ejected.  Of  course  I  can  have  no  accurate  knowledge  of 
the  merits  of  the  case.  I  can  do  no  more  than  ask  you,  which  I 
cheerfully  do,  that  you  will  have  the  case  carefully  investigated, 
and  do  justice  in  it.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 


1ALS,  IHi.  General  Banks  replied  on  March  26,  1864: 

"Your  letter  relating  to  the  case  of  Mrs.  J.  Q.  A.  Fellows,  who  was  dis- 
possessed of  her  House  by  order  of  the  Treasury  Agent  in  New  Orleans,  was 
given  to  me  by  Mrs  Fellows,  before  I  left  New  Orleans.  The  case  is  as  follows: 
—  All  the  real  estate  in  New  Orleans  belonging  to  active  Rebels  -was  seized  by 
the  military  authorities  as  far  as  it  could  be  identified.  It  was  all  made  to  pay 
rent  to  the  government,  when  not  in  use  by  the  government  itself:  and  care- 
fully protected,  until  the  courts  under  the  law  of  confiscation  should  decide 
the  rights  of  the  claimants  for  repossession.  Pending  this  decision,  by  an  order 
from  the  war  department,  I  turned  over  all  this  property  in  the  Department, 
Plantations  and  other  estates  to  Honble.  B.  F.  Flanders,  Treasury  agent,  who 
assumed  possession,  collected  the  rents,  controlled  the  occupancy,  and  when  it 
seemed  to  him  proper,  restored  these  estates  ...  to  the  Rebels  who  claimed 
them:  —  the  cases  still  pending  in  the  District  court  of  the  United  States.  The 
only  control  over  any  of  this  property  that  I  have  relates  to  that  which  is 
required  for  miliary  uses.  The  rest  is  under  the  exclusive  control  of  the 
Treasury  Agent,  and  I  am  required  to  assist  with  military  force,  the  execution 
of  any  order  he  gives  concerning  the  disposition  of  this  property  by  the  same 
general  order  No:  88  of  the  War  Department. 

"Mr:  Fellows  is  an  honorable  and  perfectly  loyal  man,  as  thoroughly  so 
as  Mr:  Flanders  or  any  man  in  New  Orleans,  but  he  is  weak  enough  to  be- 
lieve that  the  constitution  of  Louisiana  can  be  restored  as  it  was.  .  .  .  He  was 
active  in  the  Riddell  election  which  took  place  when  I  was  in  Texas.  .  .  . 
There  can  be  ...  no  other  cause  for  the  ejectment  of  his  family,  than  that  this 
course  was  politically  unacceptable  to  Mr:  Flanders,  and  his  friends.  He  as- 
signed this  house  to  an  officer  of  the  army  who  was  to  pay  rent  as  Mr  Fel- 
lows had  done,  and  made  a  demand  upon  me  in  writing  for  the  support  I  was 
required  to  give  him  by  war  Dept:  orders  No:  88,  which  with  the  greatest 
reluctance  I  gave  him  —  hence  the  visit  of  Mrs  Fellows  to  Washington.  She 
had  a  good  case,  but  it  concerns  the  Treasury  officers,  not  the  war  Department. 
When  she  presented  me  your  letter  directing  an  investigation  of  the  case,  I 
immediately  requested  Brigadier  General  [James]  Bowen  to  present  the  case 
in  person  to  Mr  Flanders,  and  requested  his  attention  to  your  request.  He 
replied  that  when  Colonel  Dudley,  the  occupant  surrendered  the  house,  he 
would  assign  it  to  Mrs  Fellows,  and  not  till  then.  Colonel  Dudley  is  now 
commanding  a  Brigade  of  Cavalry  in  front  of  the  enemy  here  It  is  very  hard 

[186] 


FEBRUARY      1  6,      1864 

for  me  to  order  the  family  of  a  soldier,  who  is  in  the  field,  out  of  a  house 
which  is  assigned  to  him  by  the  officers  of  the  Treasury  who  have  by  orders 
of  the  War  &  Treasury  Departments  exclusive  control  over  it. 

"The  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  should  be  required  to  give  such  orders  to 
his  agent  in  New  Orleans  as  may  be  required  in  this  case.  ...  I  enclose 
copies  of  all  the  papers  in  this  case,  and  have  written  to  Mrs  Fellows,  and 
to  Senator  Foote,  a  full  statement  of  the  facts  involved.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

Endorsement  Concerning  W.  Marshall  Swayne1 

I  indorse  what  is  said  above  of  Mr.  Swayne.       A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  16.  1864 

1AES,  owned  by  Mrs.  Isaac  G.  Roberts,  West  Chester,  Pennsylvania.  Lin- 
coln's endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Salmon  P.  Chase,  January  17,  1864: 
"Mr.  W.  Marshall  Swayne,  a  clerk  in  the  Internal  Revenue  Bureau,  wishes  to 
contribute  to  the  Fair  to  be  held  in  this  city  for  the  benefit  of  the  Christian 
Commission  a  Series  of  bas  reliefs  heads  of  the  President  and  the  Heads  of 
Departments.  Mr.  Swayne  has  modeled  a  head  of  myself  and  I  think  of  Gov- 
ernor Seward,  which  are  said  to  be  good.  His  object  is  certainly  a  good  one, 
and  if  you  will  give  him  a  sitting  or  two  to  enable  him  to  accomplish  it,  you  will 
help  it  and  at  the  same  time  gratify  a  very  worthy  gentlemen  [szc] .  He  devotes 
only  his  spare  hours  to  the  work,  not  allowing  it  to  interfere  at  all  with  his 
official  duties."  The  bust  sculptured  by  Swayne  was  finally  sent  to  the  Great 
Central  Fair  at  Philadelphia  (New  York  Tribune,  June  15,  1864). 

Endorsement  Concerning  William  Yocum1 

William  Yocum,  within  named,  is  hereby  pardoned. 

February  16,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  Senate  Executive  "Document  No.  51, 
p.  20.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  given  as  appearing  on  a  petition  signed  by 
Lucian  Anderson,  Brutus  J.  Clay,  W.  H.  Randall,  S.  L.  Casey,  and  G.  Clay 
Smith.  See  Lincoln  to  Holt,  February  3,  supra,  and  to  the  Senate,  June  13,  infra. 

To  the  House  of  Representatives1 

February  16,  1864 
To  the  House  of  Representatives,  of  the  United  States. 

In  answer  to  the  resolution  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of 
the  8th  instant  requesting  information  touching  the  arrest  of  the 
United  States  Consul  General  to  the  British  North  American  Prov- 
inces, and  certain  official  communications  respecting  Canadian 
commerce,  I  transmit  a  report  from  the  Secretary  of  State,  and  the 
documents  by  which  it  was  accompanied. 

[Washington,  February  16,  1864.]          [ABRAHAM  LUNTCOLTST.] 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  39.  The  date  and  sig- 
nature have  been  cut  off  the  document.  The  enclosures  are  printed  in  Thirty- 
eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  House  Executive  Document  No.  59.  William 

[187] 


FEBRUARY      1  6,      ±864 

G  L  Redpath  of  New  York  brought  suit  against  Joshua  R.  Giddings,  consul 
general  at  Montreal,  charging  kidnapping,  imprisonment,  and  forcible  return 
to  the  United  States  from  Canada.  Giddings  was  arrested  upon  returning  to 
Ohio  on  leave  of  absence. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

February  16,  1864 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives: 

I  transmit  to  Congress  a  Report  from  the  Secretary  of  State, 
with  the  accompanying  papers,  relative  to  the  claim  on  this  Gov- 
ernment of  the  owners  of  the  French  ship  "La  Manche";  and 
recommend  an  appropriation  for  the  satisfaction  of  the  claim,  pur- 
suant to  the  award  of  the  arbitrators.  ABRAHAM  LIISTCOLTST 

Washington,  i6th.  February,  1864. 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  a8A  FS;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  Original  Executive 
Document.  An  act  approved  March  22,  1864,  appropriated  "a  sufficient  amount 
to  purchase  a  bill  of  exchange  .  .  .  for  the  sum  of  one  hundred  and  forty 
thousand  seven  hundred  and  thirty-five  and  fifteen  one-hundredths  francs,  with 
interest  .  .  ."  as  indemnity  to  the  owners  of  the  La  Manche,  seized  on  August 
23,  1862,  and  released  by  the  Prize  Court. 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  State  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir:  Washington.  Feb.  16.  1864. 

Hon.  W.  H.  Wallace,  formerly  of  Washington  Territory,  and 
now  of  Idaho,  says  that  Elwood  Evans,  Secretary  of  Washington 
T.  was  appointed  at  his  —  Mr.  W's.  recommendation,  and  that  he 
has  gone  wholly  over  to  the  enemy,  using  the  patronage  to  estab- 
lish and  uphold  a  paper  to  oppose  &  embarrass  the  Administra- 
tion.2 

1  AL  and  AES,  NAuE.  No  reply  has  been  discovered.  Evans  remained  in  office 
as  secretary  of  Washington  Territory. 

2  The  letter  is  unsigned,  but  a  small  slip  bearing  "File  —  A.L.  Sep.  27.  1864," 
is  pasted  on  the  bottom. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

February  16,   1864 

Will  the  Sec.  of  War  please  oblige  Judge  Catron  in  the  matter. 

A. 


1  Parke-Bernet  Catalog  611,  December  4-5,  1944,  No.  269.  According  to  the 
catalog  description,  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written   on   a   letter   from   John 


^  an  °rder  from  the  War  Department  for   release   of    a   prisoner 

which  had  been  wrongly  directed.  No  further  reference  has  been  discovered. 

[188] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War,  please  see  and  hear  Mr.  Marshall,  of  St. 
Louis.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  ±69  1864. 

!Copy,  ISLA.  Representative  William  R.  Morrison  wrote  on  February  11, 
1864:  "I  write  this  to  introduce  to  you  the  bearer  George  Marshall  Esqr  of  St. 
Louis  in  the  absence  of  Mr.  Blair  his  representative  &  friend.  Mr.  Marshall  is 
a  friend  of  yours  &  desires  to  see  you  on  business.  See  him  if  possible."  (DLC- 
RTL). 


To  Edward  Bates1 

I  will  thank  the  Attorney  General  to  enquire  into  this  case  and 
report  upon  it.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb  17.  1864 

Let  the  pardon  be  made  out.          A.  LINCOLN. 
March.  2,  1864. 

1  AES,  CSmH.  Lincoln's  endorsements  are  written  on  a  letter  from  James 
S.  Rollins  and  others,  February  8,  1864,  asking  pardon  of  Porter  Jackman  of 
Howard  County,  Missouri,  imprisoned  and  fined  by  a  military  commission  for 
disloyalty.  Bates  endorsed  on  March  2,  1864,  "I  have  no  doubt  of  your  pouter 
to  exonerate  the  man  by  a  pardon.  And,  in  view  of  the  within  Statement,  I 
advise  it  to  be  done. 

"If  you  determine  to  grant  the  pardon,  please  send  your  order,  endorsed  on 
this  paper." 


To  William  M.  Fishback1 

William  Fishback  Washington,  B.C., 

Little  Rock,  Arkansas  Feb.  17  1864 

When  I  fixed  a  plan  for  an  election  in  Arkansas  I  did  it  in  ig- 
norance that  your  convention  was  doing  the  same  work.  Since  I 
learned  the  latter  fact,  I  have  been  constantly  trying  to  yield  my 
plan  to  them.  I  have  sent  two  letters  to  Gen.  Steele,  and  three  or 
four  despatches  to  you  and  others,  saying  that  he — Gen.  Steele — 
must  be  master,  but  that  it  will  probably  be  best  for  him  to  merely 
help  the  convention  on  it's  own  plan.  Some  single  mind  must  be 
master,  else  there  will  be  no  agreement  in  anything,  &  Gen.  Steele, 
commanding  the  Military,  and  being  on  the  ground,  is  the  best 
man  to  be  that  master.  Even  now,  citizens  are  telegraphing  me  to 
postpone  the  election  to  a  later  day  than  either  that  fixed  by  the 
convention  or  by  me.  This  discord  must  be  silenced. 

A.  LINCOLN* 

[189] 


FEBRUARY      1  7,      1864 

*  ALS  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Murphy,  February  8,  supra,  and  to  Steele,  infra. 
Fishback  was  elected  U.S.  Senator  when  the  Arkansas  legislature  convened  on 
April  25  under  the  new  constitution. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Please  see  and  hear  Mr.  Gibbs,  on  the  subject  of  the  within  letter 
of  Gov.  Andrew.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  17,  1864 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War 

1AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  following  letter 
from  Governor  John  A.  Andrew,  February  12,  1864: 

"I  respectfully  introduce  .  .  .  Mr.  O [liver].  C.  Gibbs,  Postmaster  of  Ware- 
ham,  Mass,  who  on  many  occasions  during  the  past  three  years  hns  been  de- 
tailed to  visit  various  camps  and  Hospitals  of  the  army,  as  a  Messenger  of 
charity  and  relief  to  Massachusetts  soldiers.  I  have  learned  through  Mr  Gibbs 
and  otherwise,  that  persons  of  color,  both  freemen  and  refugees  from  slavery, 
desiring  to  pass  northward  from  Washington,  seeking  to  bettor  their  fortunes 
and  support  their  families  by  reaching  Massachusetts,  are  forcibly  and  against 
their  will  detained.  I  am  at  a  loss  to  understand  by  what  color  of  pretended 
authority  people  not  charged  with  crime,  and  not  being  engaged  in  the  mili- 
tary service,  and  being  in  the  peace  of  the  law,  are  thus  subjected  to  hardship 
and  wrong.  Aside  from  the  oppressiveness  of  such  treatment  against  which  I 
respectfully  remonstrate,  I  appeal  in  behalf  of  the  Commonwealth  of  Massa- 
chusetts, whose  right  to  receive  immigrants  from  all  parts  of  the  Union  choos- 
ing to  come  here  is  thus  unlawfully  interfered  with.  Suppose  the  passage  of 
Germans  and  Irishmen  seeking  to  buy  land  and  make  their  homes  in  the  great 
land  states  of  the  West  was  denied,  and  they  were  compelled  to  remain  in  New 
England  or  New  York,  how  long  would  such  an  embargo  on  population  bo 
endured  by  Illinois,  and  her  neighboring  States.  .  .  .  The  industry  of  Massa- 
chusetts imperatively  demands  every  laborer  now  on  her  soil  or  willing  to 
come.  The  people  of  Massachusetts,  in  addition  to  furnishing  her  quota  of  sol- 
diers, manufacture  one  third  of  all  the  woollen  goods  in  the  country,  without 
which  the  army  cannot  live  a  day.  And  notwithstanding  the  shoo  contracts  in 
which  she  directly  participates,  many  of  the  shoes  contracted  for  by  .  .  .  other 
States  are  farmed  out  at  a  profit  to  her  shoemakers  .  .  .  hold  at.  least  one 
twelfth  of  the  National  Loan,  How  long  then  can  we  continue  to  furnish  sol- 
diers, help  clothe  the  army,  fabricate  ships,  machinery  and  munitions  of  war, 
subscribe  to  the  National  Loans,  and  furnish  internal  revenue  if  persons  de- 
siring to  make  their  way  hither  are  forbidden  to  come?  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

See  Lincoln's  reply  to  Andrew,  February  18,  infra. 


To  Frederick  Steele1 

Major  General  Steele  Executive  Mansion, 

Little,-Rock,  Ark.  Washington,  Feb.  17,  1864. 

The  day  fixed  by  the  Convention  for  the  election  is  probably 
the  best,  but  you,  on  the  ground,  and  in  consultation  with  gentle- 
men there,  are  to  decide.  I  should  have  fixed  no  day  for  an  election 

[190] 


FEBRUARY      1  8,      ±864 

—  presented  no  plan  for  reconstruction  —  had  I  known  the  conven- 
tion was  doing  the  same  things.  It  is  probably  best  that  you  merely 
assist  the  convention  on  their  own  plan,  as  to  election  day  &  all 
other  matters.  I  have  already  written  and  telegraphed  this  half  a 
dozen  times.  A. 


1ALS,  RPB.  General  Steele  telegraphed  on  February  16:  "On  what  day 
have  you  ordered  the  election  in  this  State  &  do  your  instructions  to  me  cor- 
respond -with  the  action  of  the  Convention?"  (DLC-RTL).  See  Lincoln  to 
Murphy,  February  8,  supra. 


To  John  A.  Andrew1 

His  Excellency.  John  A.  Andrew  Executive  Mansion, 

Governor  of  Massachusetts         Washington,  February  18.  1864. 

Yours  of  the  12th.  was  received  yesterday.  If  I  were  to  judge 
from  the  letter,  without  any  external  knowledge,  I  should  suppose 
that  all  the  colored  people  South  of  Washington  were  struggling  to 
get  to  Massachusetts;  that  Massachusetts  was  anxious  to  receive 
and  retain  the  whole  of  them  as  permanent  citizens;  and  that  the 
United  States  Government  here  was  interposing  and  preventing 
this.  But  I  suppose  these  are  neither  really  the  facts,  nor  meant  to 
be  asserted  as  true  by  you.  Coming  down  to  what  I  suppose  to  be 
the  real  facts,  you  are  engaged  in  trying  to  raise  colored  troops  for 
the  U.S.  and  wish  to  take  recruits  from  Virginia,  through  Wash- 
ington, to  Massachusetts  for  that  object;  and  the  loyal  Governor 
of  Virginia,  also  trying  to  raise  troops  for  us,  objects  to  your  taking 
his  material  away;  while  we,  having  to  care  for  all,  and  being 
responsible  alike  to  all,  have  to  do  as  much  for  him,  as  we  would 
have  to  do  for  you,  if  he  was,  by  our  authority,  taking  men  from 
Massachusetts  to  fill  up  Virginia  regiments.  No  more  than  this 
has  been  intended  by  me;  nor,  as  I  think,  by  the  Secretary  of  War. 
There  may  have  been  some  abuses  of  this,  as  a  rule,  which,  if 
known,  should  be  prevented  in  future. 

If,  however,  it  be  really  true  that  Massachusetts  wishes  to  afford 
a  permanent  home  within  her  borders,  for  all,  or  even  a  large 
number  of  colored  persons  who  will  come  to  her,  I  shall  be  only 
too  glad  to  know  it.  It  would  give  relief  in  a  very  difficult  point; 
and  I  would  not  for  a  moment  hinder  from  going,  any  person  who 
is  free  by  the  terms  of  the  proclamation  or  any  of  the  acts  of 
Congress. 

1  ADf,  DLC-RTL.  Andrew's  letter  of  February  12  is  given  in  the  note  to 
Lincoln's  endorsement  to  Stanton,  February  17,  supra.  See  also  Lincoln  to 
Stanton,  February  25,  infra. 

[191] 


Memorandum  Concerning  John  A.  Andrew1 

[c.  February  18,  1864  ?] 
I  have  not  yet  my  letter  ready  for  Gov.  Andrew.          A.  L. 

i  ADS  DLC-Nicolay  Papers.  The  date  has  been  supplied  on  the  supposition 
that  this  memorandum  refers  to  the  unfinished  draft  of  Lincoln's  letter  to  Andrew, 
supra. 

Proclamation  Concerning  Blockade1 

February  18,  1864 
By  the  President  of  the  United  States  of  America: 

A  Proclamation. 

Whereas,  by  my  Proclamation  of  the  nineteenth  of  April,  one 
thousand  eight  hundred  and  sixty-one,  the  ports  of  the  States  of 
South  Carolina,  Georgia,  Alabama,  Florida,  Mississippi,  Louisiana 
and  Texas,  were,  for  reasons  therein  set  forth,  placed  under 
blockade;  and  whereas,  the  port  of  Brownsville  in  the  district  of 
Brazos  Santiago  in  the  State  of  Texas,  has  since  been  blockaded, 
but  as  the  blockade  of  said  port  may  now  be  safely  relaxed  with 
advantage  to  the  interests  of  commerce: 

Now,  therefore,  be  it  known  that  I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President 
of  the  United  States,  pursuant  to  the  authority  in  me  vested  by  the 
fifth  section  of  the  act  of  Congress  approved  on  the  13th.  of  July 
1861,  entitled,  "an  act  further  to  provide  for  the  collection  of  du- 
ties on  imports,  and  for  other  purposes,"  do  hereby  declare  that 
the  blockade  of  the  said  port  of  Brownsville  shall  so  far  cease  and 
determine  from  and  after  this  date,  that  commercial  intercourse 
with  said  port,  except  as  to  persons,  things  and  information  here- 
inafter specified,  may,  from  this  date,  be  carried  on,  subject  to  the 
laws  of  the  United  States,  to  the  regulations  prescribed  by  the 
Secretary  of  the  Treasury,  and  until  the  rebellion  shall  have  been 
suppressed,  to  such  orders  as  may  be  promulgated  by  the  General 
Commanding  the  Department,  or  by  an  officer  duly  authorized  by 
him  and  commanding  at  said  port.  This  Proclamation  does  not  au- 
thorize or  allow  the  shipment  or  conveyance  of  persons  in  or  in- 
tending to  enter  the  service  of  the  insurgents,  or  of  things  or  in- 
formation intended  for  their  use,  or  for  their  aid  or  comfort,  nor 
except  upon  the  permission  of  the  Secretary  of  War  or  of  some 
officer  duly  authorized  by  him,  of  the  following  prohibited  articles, 
namely — cannon,  mortars,  firearms,  pistols,  bombs,  grenades, 
powder,  saltpetre,  sulphur,  balls,  bullets,  pikes,  swords,  boarding- 

[192] 


FEBRUARY      1  8,      1864 

caps,  (always  excepting  the  quantity  of  the  said  articles  which 
may  be  necessary  for  the  defence  of  the  ship  and  those  who  com- 
pose the  crew)  saddles,  bridles,  cartridge-bag  material,  percussion 
and  other  caps,  clothing  adapted  for  uniforms,  sail  cloth  of  all 
kinds,  hemp  and  cordage,  intoxicating  drinks,  other  than  beer  and 
light  native  wines. 

To  vessels  clearing  from,  foreign  ports,  and  destined  to  the  port 
of  Brownsville,  opened  by  this  Proclamation,  licenses  will  be 
granted  by  Consuls  of  the  United  States  upon  satisfactory  evidence 
that  the  vessels  so  licensed  will  convey  no  persons,  property  or 
information  excepted  or  prohibited  above,  either  to  or  from  the 
said  port;  which  licenses  shall  be  exhibited  to  the  Collector  of  said 
port  immediately  on  arrival,  and  if  required,  to  any  officer  in 
charge  of  the  blockade;  and  on  leaving  said  port,  every  vessel  will 
be  required  to  have  a  clearance  from  the  Collector  of  the  Customs, 
according  to  law,  showing  no  violation  of  the  conditions  of  the  li- 
cense. Any  violations  of  said  conditions  will  involve  the  forfeiture 
and  condemnation  of  the  vessel  and  cargo,  and  the  exclusion  of  all 
parties  concerned  from  any  further  privilege  of  entering  the 
United  States  during  the  war  for  any  purpose  whatever. 

In  all  respects,  except  as  herein  specified,  the  existing  blockade 
remains  in  full  force  and  effect  as  hitherto  established  and  main- 
tained, nor  is  it  relaxed  by  this  Proclamation  except  in  regard  to 
the  port  to  which  relaxation  is  or  has  been  expressely  applied. 

In  witness  whereof,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand,  and  caused 
the  seal  of  the  United  States  to  be  affixed. 

Done  at  the  city  of  Washington,  this  eighteenth  day  of  Febru- 
ary, in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred 
[L.S.]          and  sixty-four,  and  of  the  Independence  of  the  United 
States  the  eighty-eighth.  ABRAHAM 

By  the  President: 

WILLIAM:  H.  SEWARD,  Secretary  of  State. 

1  DS,  DNA  FS  RG  11,  Proclamations. 


To  A.  Robinson1 

A.  Robinson:  Executive  Mansion 

Leroy,  N.Y.  Washington,  Feb.  18.  1864 

The  law  only  obliges  us  to  keep  accounts  with  States,  or,  at 
most,  Congressional  Districts;  and  it  would  overwhelm  us  to  at- 
tempt in  counties,  cities  and  towns.  Nevertheless  we  do  what  we 
can  to  oblige  in  particular  cases.  In  this  view  I  send  your  despatch 

[193] 


FEBRUARY      1  Q,      ±864 

to  the  Provost-Marshall-General,  asking  him  to  do  the  best  he  can 
for  you.  A-  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  RPB.  Robinson's  message  has  not  been  discovered.  It  probably  had  to 
do  with  draft  quotas. 

To  George  S.  Blake1 

Com.  Geo.  S.  Blake.  Executive  Mansion. 

Comdt.  Naval  Academy  *9  Feb.   1864. 

Newport,  R.I. 

I  desire  the  case  o£  Midshipman  C.  Lyon  re-examined  and  if  not 
clearly  inconsistent  I  shall  be  much  obliged  to  have  the  recom- 
mendation changed.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1LS,  RPB.  Acting  Midshipman  Caleb  Lyon  (Jr.?)  is  listed  as  having  re- 
signed at  Annapolis,  February  10,  1862.  No  further  reference  has  been  found. 


To  Roscoe  Conkling1 

Hon.  R.  Conkling  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  February  19,  1864. 

I  have  just  received  the  letter  of  yourself  and  others  in  relation 
to  Caleb  Lyon.  I  understood  he  was  once  a  member  of  Congress; 
his  nomination  to  some  respectable  office  was  repeatedly  urged 
upon  me  certainly  by  two,  if  not  three  Senators  of  the  highest 
standing;  and  your  letter  contains  the  first  imputation  I  ever  heard 
against  his  moral  character.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LIN  COLIN" 

1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  Ex-congressman  Roscoe  Conkling's  letter  has  not  been  dis- 
covered. See  Lincoln's  letter  to  Lyon,  February  i,  and  to  Seward,  February  2, 
supra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

February  19,   1864 

The  writer  of  this,  Hon.  Mr.  Nelson  of  Tennessee,  is  a  man  of 
mark,  and  one  whom  I  would  like  to  have  obliged.  I  am  in  favor 
of  discharging  his  son,  with  pledge  that  he  shall  not  be  conscripted, 
upon  his  taking  the  oath  of  December  8.  A.  LINCOLN. 

February  19,  1864. 

1  Leslie  J.  Perry,  "Appeals  to  Lincoln's  Clemency,"  The  Century  Magazine, 
LI  ^  (December,  1895),  253.  According  to  Perry,  Lincoln's  endorsement  was 
written  on  the  back  of  a  letter  from  Thomas  A.  R.  Nelson,  but  the  name  of 
Nelson's  confederate  son  is  not  given. 

[194] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  make  out  a  pardon  in  this  case. 
Feb.  20.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 


DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  517.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  letter  from  George  F.  Brown,  D.D.,  "Moral  Instructor  to  the 
N.J.  State  Prison,"  Trenton,  New  Jersey,  December  23,  1863,  recommending 
pardon  of  James  Ackerman  serving  sentence  for  making  counterfeit  coin. 


To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Hon.  Secretary  of  Treasury:  February  20,  1864. 

My  Dear  Sir:  Herewith  I  return  the  affidavit  you  handed  me. 
In  glancing  it  over  I  do  not  perceive  anything  necessarily  incon- 
sistent with  the  practice  of  detectives,  and  others,  engaged  in  the 
business  of  "rascal-catching;"  but  a  closer  consideration  might 
show  it.  It  seems  to  me  that  August.,  the  month  within  which  the 
affiant  fixes  his  first  interview  with  Hanscomb,  was  really  before 
Hanscomb  left  Boston  and  came  to  New  York.  Yours  truly, 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Robert  B.  Warden,  Account  of  the  Private  Life  and  Public  Services  of  Sal- 
mon Portland  Chase  (1864),  p.  573.  Chase  replied  on  February  22: 

"The  Solicitor  informs  me  that  Hanscomb  went  to  New  York  before  August: 
but,  also,  shows  me  a  letter  from  Mr.  Bailey  in  which  he  says  he  does  not  put 
much  confidence  in  its  statements. 

"You  were  kind  enough  to  say  you  would  see  Mr.  Bailey:  but  he  will  not 
be  here  till  the  latter  part  of  this  week  or  the  first  of  next."  (DLC-RTL). 

Albert  Hanscom,  deputy  collector  in  the  Boston  Custom  House,  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  same  post  in  the  New  York  Custom  House  in  1863.  The  affidavit 
referred  to  has  not  been  discovered.  See  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  25,  infra. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

I  specially  request  that  you  will  see  Judge  Cooper  and  allow  him 
to  take  his  brother  home  with  him.  A.  LINCOLN* 

Feb.  20.  1864 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War. 

Feb.  20.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  DLC-Hitchcock  Papers.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  •written  on  a  letter 
from  Edward  Cooper  and  Judge  Henry  Cooper  of  Shelbyville,  Tennessee,  Feb- 
ruary 19,  1864,  asking  release  of  their  brother  F.  F.  Cooper,  a  prisoner  of  war 
at  Camp  Morton,  Indiana,  ill  with  tuberculosis.  Stanton  endorsed  directing 
General  Ethan  A.  Hitchcock  to  "issue  the  order  for  discharge  of  the  within 
named  prisoner  on  his  taking  the  oath." 

[195] 


To  Warren  Jordan1 

Warren  Jordan  Washington   DC., 

Nashville,  Tenn.  February  21   [20?]   1864 

In  county  elections  you  had  better  stand  by  Gov.  Johnson's 
plan  Otherwise  you  will  have  conflict  and  confusion.  I  have  seen 
his  plan.  A-  LINCOLN 

i  ALS  RPB.  The  date  numeral  "21"  of  this  manuscript  is  not  in  Lincoln's 
handwriting.  As  printed  by  Nicolay  and  Hay  (X,ir)  the  date  of  the  telegram 
is  "February  20."  Since  February  21  was  Sunday,  Nicolay  and  Hay  may  have 
the  correct  date,  but  no  corroboration  has  been  discovered.  Concerning  Warren 
Jordan,  see  further  Lincoln's  communication  to  East,  February  27,  infra. 

To  George  S.  BoutwelF 

Thanks  for  the  privilege  of  reading. 
Feb.  22.  1864.  A.  L. 

1  AES,  owned  by  L.  E.  Dicke,  Evanston,  Illinois.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on 
an  envelope  addressed  to  George  S.  Boutwell  from  Nathaniel  P.  Banks,  post- 
marked at  New  York,  February  20,  contents  unknown. 

To  John  Brough1 

His  Excellency  Executive  Mansion, 

Governor  Brough  Washington, 

Columbus,  Ohio  Feb.  22.  1864. 

As  you  request,  Clinton  Fuller,  charged  as  a  deserter,  is  par- 
doned. A. 


1  ALS,  RPB.  No  conrmunication  from  Governor  Brough  in   this  connection 
has  been  discovered,  and  Clinton  Fuller  has  not  been  identified. 


To  William  P.  Dole1 

Commissioner  of  Indian  Affairs,  please  examine  and  report  upon 
this  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  22.  1864 

*  AES,  ORB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  John  Ross, 
Principal  Chief  of  the  Cherokee  Nation,  February  18,  1864,  presenting  a  pe- 
tition of  the  Cherokees  "sent  ...  by  the  hands  of  the  Hon.  Lewis  Ross,  the 
Treasurer  of  the  Nation"  asking  government  aid  in  alleviating  "the  extreme 
destitution  to  which  the  people  of  the  Cherokee  Nation  have  been  reduced  by 
the  disasters  of  the  present  war.  .  .  ."  The  appropriation  approved  June  25, 
1864,  for  expenses  of  the  Indian  Department,  authorized  the  Secretary  of  In- 
terior to  extend  relief  to  refugee  Indians,  including  Cherokees,  "reduced  to 
want  on  account  of  their  friendship  to  the  United  States." 

[196] 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

This  is  a  peculiar  case,  &  I  will  thank  the  Judge  Advocate  Gen- 
eral to  have  made  for  me  a  good  abstract  of  the  evidence 
Feb.  22.  1864  A, 


i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1277.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  papers  in  the  case  of  Captain  Charles  C.  Moore, 
tried  by  a  military  commission  on  Lincoln's  order  to  Robert  C.  Schenck,  No- 
vember 20,  1863,  supra.  Captain  Moore  was  acquitted  and  died  a  prisoner  of 
the  enemy  on  August  31,  1864. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Loan1 

Hon.  B.  Loan  War  Department 

Dear  Sir:  Washington,  Feb.  22,  1864 

At  your  instance  I  directed  a  part  of  the  advertising  for  this 
Department  to  be  done  in  the  St.  Joseph  Tribune.  I  have  just  been 
informed  that  the  Tribune  openly  avows  it's  determination  that 
in  no  event  will  it  support  the  re-election  of  the  President.  As  you 
probably  know',  please  inform  me  whether  this  is  true.  The  Presi- 
dent's wish  is  that  no  objection  shall  be  made  to  any  paper  re- 
spectfully expressing  it's  preference  for  the  nomination  of  any 
candidate;  but  that  the  patronage  of  the  government  shall  be 
given  to  none  which  engages  in  cultivating  a  sentiment  to  oppose 
the  election  of  any  when  he  shall  have  been  fairly  nominated  by 
the  regular  Union  National  Convention. 

1  ADf,  DLC-Stanton  Papers.  Lincoln  presumably  drafted  this  letter  for 
Stanton  to  sign.  A  complimentary  close  "Yrs  truly"  has  been  added  to  the 
document  in  Stanton's  handwriting.  It  has  not  been  established  that  Stanton 
sent  the  message.  No  reply  from  Representative  Loan  or  from  D.  K.  Abeel, 
proprietor  of  the  St.  Joseph,  Missouri,  Tribune,  has  been  discovered. 

Remarks  at  Opening  of  Patent  Office  Fair1 

February  22,  1864 

Loud  calls  being  made  then  for  the  President,  Mr.  Lincoln 
stepped  forward,  and  said  that  he  appeared  before  the  audience  to 
apologize  for  not  speaking  rather  than  to  speak. 

He  thought  that  the  Committee  had  practiced  a  little  fraud  on 
him,  for  they  did  not  intimate  when  they  came  to  see  him  in  the 
morning,  that  they  expected  him  to  speak,  therefore  he  had  come 
before  the  audience  totally  unprepared  to  say  anything;  that  was 
taking  one  at  great  disadvantage  after  the  eloquent  speech  of  Mr. 
Chittenden  and  the  poem  of  Mr.  French. 

There  was  great  objection  to  his  saying  anything,  for  necessar- 

[197] 


FEBRUARY      22,      ±864 

ily,  in  consequence  of  his  position,  everything  went  into  print. 
[Laughter  and  applause.]  If  he  made  any  mistake  it  might  do 
both  himself  and  the  nation  harm.  [Applause.]  It  was  very  diffi- 
cult to  say  sensible  things.  [Laughter.]  He  therefore  hoped  that 
the  audience  would  excuse  him  after  expressing  his  desire  that 
the  charitable  enterprise  in  which  we  were  engaged  might  be 
abundantly  successful.  [Applause.] 

1  New  York  Tribune,  February  24,  1864.  Lincoln's  remarks  followed  a  speech 
by  Lucius  E.  Chittenden  and  a  patriotic  poem  read  by  Benjamin  B.  French. 

To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Major  General  Rosecrans  Washington,  D.C., 

St.  Louis,  Mo  Feb.  22  1864 

Col.  Sanderson  will  be  ordered  to  you  to-day — a  mere  omission 
that  it  was  not  done  before.  The  other  questions  in  your  despatch 
I  am  not  yet  prepared  to  answer  A.  LUSTCOLIST 

!ALS,  RPB.  General  Rosecrans  telegraphed  on  February  12,  asking  that 
Colonel  John  P.  Sanderson  of  the  Thirteenth  Infantry  "now  on  recruiting 
service  at  Newport,  Ky.  be  ordered  to  report  to  me"  for  duty  as  provost  mar- 
shal (DLC-RTL).  On  February  20,  Rosecrans  telegraphed  again:  "Will  the  law 
provide  that  the  pay  of  colored  troops  shall  be  the  same  as  for  other?  Will  the 
families  of  these  men  be  made  free?  It  is  important  and  just  that  they  should 
be  so.  Will  you  give  me  Colonel  Sanderson?  I  beg  an  early  reply."  (OR,  I, 
XXXIV,  II,  381).  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  88,  February  23,  1864,  directed 
Colonel  Sanderson  to  report  to  General  Rosecrans  without  delay. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

February  22,   1864 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives: 

I  transmit  to  Congress  the  copy  of  a  correspondence  which  has 
recently  taken  place  between  Her  Britannic  Majesty's  Minister 
accredited  to  this  Government  and  the  Secretary  of  State,  in  order 
that  the  expediency  of  sanctioning  the  acceptance,  by  the  Master 
of  the  American  schooner  "Highlander,"  of  a  present  of  a  watch 
which  the  Lords  of  the  Committee  of  Her  Majesty's  Privy  Council 
for  Trade  propose  to  present  to  him  in  recognition  of  services 
rendered  by  him  to  the  crew  of  the  British  vessel  "Pearl,"  may 
be  taken  into  consideration.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  22d.  Feby.  1864. 

IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38A  Fa;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive 
Document  No.  43.  The  correspondence  transmitted  concerned  the  request  (De- 
cember 31,  1863)  of  the  British  Privy  Council  for  Trade  for  permission  to  pre- 
sent a  gold  watch  to  the  master  of  the  Highlander  (unnamed),  in  recognition 
of  his  rescue  of  the  crew  of  the  British  vessel  Pearl.  Secretary  Seward  replied 

[198] 


FEBRUARY      22,      1864 

on  February  20,  1864,  that  congressional  assent  was  necessary  (Thirty-eighth 
Congress,  First  Session,  Executive  Document  No.  43).  On  March  i,  Senator 
Sumner  reported  a  joint  resolution  giving  assent,  which  was  tabled  on  March  3. 
On  March  9,  Sumner  offered  a  resolution  which  was  passed,  to  the  effect  that 
the  master  of  the  Highlander  was  not  an  officer  of  the  U.S.  Navy  and  held  no 
office  of  trust  or  profit  such  as  contemplated  by  the  Constitution  for  congres- 
sional consent  for  acceptance  of  gifts. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

I  believe  it  was  agreed  some  days  ago  that  Gen.  Sigel  should  be 
assigned  to  West- Virginia.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  22.  1864. 

1  AES,  DLC-Stanton  Papers.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter 
from  Sigismund  Kaufman  and  others,  New  York,  February  12,  1864,  urging 
assignment  of  General  Franz  Sigel. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

[c.  February  22,  1864] 

I  propose  that  the  husband's  parole  be  enlarged  so  that  he  may  oc- 
casionally visit  Washington. 

1  Copy,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  123,  Reg- 
ister notation.  Although  the  letter  bearing  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  missing,  a 
notation  on  the  register  quotes  the  above  as  appearing  on  the  application  of 
Mrs.  V.  C.  K.  Neagle. 

To  Frederick  Steele1 

Major  General  Steele  Washington,  D.C., 

Little  Rock,  Arkansas  Feb.  22.  1864 

Yours  of  yesterday  received.  Your  conferrence  with  citizens  ap- 
proved. Let  the  election  be  on  the  fourteenth  of  March,  as  they 
agreed.  A.  LINCOLN 

l  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Steele,  February  17,  supra.  General  Steele's  tele- 
gram of  February  21  is  as  follows:  "I  called  together  the  prominent  citizens 
who  telegraphed  you  opposite  opinions  in  regard  to  the  day  on  which  the  elec- 
tion should  be  held  and  they  agree  unanimously  on  the  fourteenth  (14)  of 
March.  Your  written  instructions  are  not  yet  rec'd.  It  is  probable  that  several 
thousand  votes  will  be  polled  in  excess  of  the  required  number.  A.  A.  C.  Rogers 
of  Pine  Bluff  is  announced  as  opposing  candidate  for  governor."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Gideon  Welles1 

February  22,  1864 

These  extracts  from  letters  of  Admiral  Foote  show  Commander 
Stembel  to  be  a  very  meritorious  officer;  unless  the  Sec.  of  the 
Navy  knows  some  reason  to  the  contrary,  I  propose  that  a  vote  of 

[199] 


FEBRUARY      23,      1864 

thanks  be  asked  of  Congress  for  him.  If  there  be  nothing  in  the 
way,  please  send  me  the  papers  to  sign.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  22,  1864. 

i  Stan  V.  Henkels  Catalog  1328,  May  25,  1923,  No.  271.  According  to  the 
catalog  description,  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  back  of  extracts 
from  letters  of  Admiral  Andrew  H.  Foote,  recommending  Commander  Roger 
N.  StembeL  No  record  has  been  found  of  Stembel's  having  received  a  con- 
gressional vote  of  thanks. 

To  Montgomery  Blair1 

February  23,  1864 

Post-Master  General  please  see  the  bearer  Mr.  Miller,  now  of 
Washington  Territory,  and  son  of  an  old  friend  of  mine  in  Illinois, 
who  originally  went  from  Kentucky.  He  conies  well  recommended 
by  his  neighbors  on  the  Pacific.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  23.  1864 

1ALS-P,  ISLA.  This  note  is  written  on  both  sides  of  a  small  card.  On  No- 
vember 18,  1863,  Anson  G.  Henry  wrote  to  Lincoln,  introducing  Miller:  "This 
will  be  handed  you  by  my  good  friend  Genl.  W.  W.  Miller  of  this  place.  He 
is  a  son  of  our  old  friend  Major  [William]  Miller  of  Jacksonville.  He  is  the 
best  specimen  of  a  Union  Democrat  of  the  Andy  Johnson  stamp,  we  have  in 
this  Territory,  and  I  know  you  will  like  to  make  his  acquaintance."  (DLC- 
RTL). 

To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Treasury  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  Feb.  23.  1864. 

Yours  of  yesterday  in  relation  to  the  paper  issued  by  Senator 
Pomeroy  was  duly  received;  and  I  write  this  note  merely  to  say 
I  will  answer  a  little  more  fully  when  I  can  find  the  leisure  to  do 
so.  Yours  truly  A.  LITNTCOLIST 

^•ALS  (copy  or  ADfS?),  DLC-RTL.  The  printed  circular  opposing  the  re- 
nomination  of  President  Lincoln  and  advocating  nomination  of  Secretary  Chase 
was  issued  over  the  signature  of  Samuel  C.  Pomeroy.  On  February  22  Chase 
wrote  ^  Lincoln : 

^  "It  'is  probable  that  you  have  already  seen  a  letter  printed  in  the  Constitu- 
tional Union  Saturday  afternoon,  &  reprinted  in  the  Intelligencer  this  morning, 
written  by  Senator  Pomeroy,  as  Chairman  of  a  Committee  of  my  political 
friends. 

"I  had  no  knowledge  of  the  existence  of  this  letter  before  I  saw  it  in  the 
Union. 

"A  few  weeks  ago  several  gentlemen  called  on  me  &  expressed  their  desire, 
which,  they  said,  was  shared  by  many  earnest  friends  of  our  common  cause, 
that  I  would  allow  my  name  to  be  submitted  to  the  consideration  of  the  people 
in  connexion  with  the  approaching  election  of  Chief  Magistrate.  I  replied  that 
I  feared  that  any  such  use  of  my  name  might  impair  my  usefulness  as  Head 
of  the  Treasury  Department  &  that  I  much  preferred  to  continue  my  labors 
where  I  am  &  free  from  distracting  influences,  until  I  could  honorably  retire 

[200] 


FEBRUARY      23,      1864 

from  them.  We  had  several  interviews.  After  consultation,  and  conference  with 
others,  they  expressed  their  united  judgment  that  the  use  of  my  name  as  pro- 
posed would  not  affect  my  usefulness  in  my  present  position,  and  that  I  ought 
to  consent  to  it.  I  accepted  their  judgment  as  decisive;  but  at  the  same  time 
told  them  distinctly  that  I  could  render  them  no  help,  except  what  might 
come  incidentally  from  the  faithful  discharge  of  public  duties,  for  these  must 
have  my  whole  time.  I  said  also  that  I  desired  them  to  regard  themselves  as 
not  only  entirely  at  liberty,  but  as  requested,  to  withdraw  my  name  from  con- 
sideration wherever,  in  their  judgment  the  public  interest  would  be  promoted 
by  so  doing. 

"The  organization  of  the  Committee,  I  presume,  followed  these  conversa- 
tions; but  I  was  not  consulted  about  it;  nor  have  I  been  consulted  as  to  its 
action;  nor  do  I  even  know  who  compose  it.  I  have  never  wished  that  my  name 
should  have  a  moment's  thought  in  comparison  with  the  common  cause  of  en- 
franchisement &  restoration  or  be  continued  before  public  a  moment  after  the 
indication  of  a  preference  by  the  friends  of  that  cause  for  another. 

"I  have  thought  this  explanation  due  to  you  as  well  as  to  myself.  If  there  is 
anything  in  my  action  or  position  which,  in  your  judgment,  will  prejudice  the 
public  interest  under  my  charge  I  beg  you  to  say  so.  I  do  not  wish  to  admin- 
ister the  Treasury  Department  one  day  without  your  entire  confidence. 

"For  yourself  I  cherish  sincere  respect  and  esteem;  and,  permit  me  to  add, 
affection.  Differences  of  opinion  as  to  administrative  action  have  not  changed 
these  sentiments;  nor  have  they  been  changed  by  assault  upon  me  by  persons 
who  profess  themselves  to  spread  representations  of  your  views  and  policy. 
You  are  not  responsible  for  acts  not  your  own;  nor  will  you  hold  me  respon- 
sible except  for  what  I  do  or  say  myself. 

"Great  numbers  now  desire  your  reelection.  Should  their  wishes  be  fulfilled 
by  the  suffrages  of  the  people  I  hope  to  carry  with  me,  into  private  life  the 
sentiments  I  now  cherish,  whole  and  unimpaired."  (DLC-RTL). 

Chase's  statement  that  he  had  no  knowledge  of  the  circular  before  it  ap- 
peared in  print  is  contradicted  by  a  statement  of  James  M.  Winchell,  author- 
in-fact  of  the  circular,  who  wrote,  in  reply  to  Jacob  W.  Schuckers*  Life  and 
Public  Services  of  Salmon  Portland  Chase  (1874),  a  detailed  account  of  the 
Pomeroy  Committee  which  included  the  following:  "Mr.  Chase  was  informed 
of  this  proposed  action  and  approved  it  fully.  He  told  me  himself  that  the  ar- 
raignment of  the  Administration  .  .  .  was  one  which  he  thoroughly  indorsed 
and  would  sustain.  The  circular  was,  therefore,  sent  out."  (J.  M.  Winchell  to 
editor,  September  14,  1874,  New  York  Times,  September  15,  1874.  Italics  are 
in  the  source.) 

See  further,  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  29,  infra. 

To  Ozias  M.  Hatch1 

"Cypher" 

Hon.  O.  M.  Hatch  Executive  Mansion, 

Springfield,  Ills.  Washington,  Feb.  23,  1864. 

I  would  be  very  glad,  but  really  I  do  not  perceive  how  I  can 
reconcile  the  difficulty  you  mention.  Will  try  to  write  you  soon. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Lincoln's  telegram  was  sent  in  reply  to  a  "confidential"  letter 
from  Hatch,  February  16,  1864: 

"Several  of  the  friends  of  General  [Richard  J.]  Oglesby,  and  Mr  Dubois, 
— Uncle  Jesse — would  dislike  very  much  to  see  an  ugly  contest  between  them, 
before  the  convention,  for  the  nomination  as  candidate  for  governor. 

[201] 


FEBRUARY      23,      1864 

"They  now  appear  to  be  more  prominent  than  other  candidates, — both  are 
qualified  but  one  can  be  nominated.  The  succeeding  four  years  may  be 

as  pregnant  with  great  events  as  the  last  three  years  .  .  .  and  it  is  of  the  ut- 
most importance  to  the  Government  as  well  as  to  the  State,  that  the  interests  of 
both,  be  entrusted  to  experienced  hands.  ... 

"For  me,  I  feel  certain,  that  Illinois  is  loyal,  and  will  demonstrate  it,  not 
only  in  the'  convention,  but  at  the  polls — in  November.  I  am  certain  that  Jesse 
desires  the  nomination  much, — and  knowing  .  .  .  there  is  no  man  more  con- 
versant, with  the  affairs,  or  interests,  of  the  state  than  he  is — I  feel  that  they 
would  be  entirely  safe,  in  his  hands.  .  .  .  We  are  certain  that  you  can,  if  you 
will,  reconcile  these  difficulties,  and  hope  you  will  do  so.  I  say  ive,  because  I 
have  conversed  with  many  of  our  friends  upon  the  subject.'*  (DLC-RTL). 

General  Oglesby  was  nominated  on  May  25  by  the  Republican  state  conven- 
tion and  was  subsequently  elected  governor  of  Illinois  over  the  Democratic 
candidate  James  C.  Robinson. 

To  Willie  Smith1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Master  Willie  Smith:  February  23,   1864 

Your  friend,  Leroy  C.  Driggs,  tells  me  you  are  a  very  earnest 
friend  of  mine,  for  which  please  allow  me  to  thank  you.  You  and 
those  of  your  age  are  to  take  charge  of  this  country  when  we 
older  ones  shall  have  gone;  and  I  am  glad  to  learn  that  you  al- 
ready take  so  lively  an  interest  in  what  just  now  so  deeply  con- 
cerns us.  Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLN* 

1  Angle,  p.  343.  Angle's  note  is  as  follows:  "Willie  Smith  was  a  lad  some 
twelve  years  of  age  who  had  conceived  an  unusually  strong  admiration  for 
Lincoln.  Among  his  father's  friends  was  Leroy  C.  Driggs,  who  told  Lincoln  of 
the  boy's  feeling  for  him."  No  further  information  has  been  found. 

Endorsement  Concerning  John  Dickson1 

February  24,  1864 

Owing  to  Mr.  Dickson  being  a  respectable  citizen  of  Illinois,  I  sup- 
pose it  was,  that  this  claim  or  case,  was  brought  to  my  notice  even 
before  the  receipt  of  the  corn  was  finally  refused.  I  only  remem- 
ber generally  that  my  impression  was  that  Mr.  D.  was  being 
hardly  dealt  with.  I  think  Major  Belger  himself  so  represented  to 
me.  I  can  only  say  now  that  I  wish  full  and  speedy  justice  to  be 
done  him.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  24.  1864 

1  AES,  owned  by  Harold  C.  Brooks,  Marshall,  Michigan.  Lincoln's  endorse- 
ment is  written  on  a  copy  of  H.R.  756,  "A  Bill  for  the  benefit  of  John  Dickson, 
of  Illinois.  .  .  .  That  the  sum  of  twenty-three  thousand  dollars  be  paid  to  John 
Dickson  ...  to  compensate  him  for  the  damages  he  sustained  by  reason  of 
the  failure  of  J.  W.  Belger,  quartermaster  of  United  States  volunteers,  to  re- 
ceive one  hundred  thousand  bushels  of  corn  tendered  .  .  .  under  a  contract 
therefor.  .  .  ."  The  bill  passed  and  was  approved  by  the  president  on  March 
11,  1864. 

[202] 


Pass  for  Simon  Cameron1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  February  24,  1864. 

Pass  Hon.  Simon  Cameron  and  friends  to  Fortress  Monroe  and 
return.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  DS,  DLC-Cameron  Papers.  On  February  8,  Cameron  wrote  General  Ben- 
jamin F.  Butler,  "Your  letter  of  the  15th  did  not  reach  me  till  the  a8th,  and 
since  my  return  home  I  have  not  been  well  enough  to  say  when  I  can  make 
you  a  visit.  But  I  will  try  to  come  some  time  before  this  month  ends.  .  .  ." 
(Private  and  Official  Correspondence  of  Benjamin  F.  Butler,  III,  395.  Butler's 
letter  of  the  15th  has  not  been  located.) 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Sir.  Washington,  Feb.  24.  1864. 

I  will  be  personally  obliged  if  the  appointment  of  an  Additional 
PayMaster  shall  be  given  to  J.  R.  Freese,  of  New- Jersey.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  THaroL.  No  record  of  an  appointment  for  Freese  has  been  found. 

To  Joseph  K.  Barnes1 

February  25,  1864 

Surgeon  General  please  have  an  examination  made  of  Michael 
Mullins,  Co.  C  Harris  Light  Cavalry,  now  at  Army  Square  Hos- 
pital, with  reference  to  his  discharge  for  disability. 

Feb.  25.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  NHi.  No  reply  or  further  reference  has  been  found. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

February  25,  1864 

Major  General  Butler  please  see  and  hear  Judge  Pitts  of  Eastern 
Shore  of  Virginia.  He  wishes  to  do  right,  but  meets  some  difficulty 
at  a  point  which  it  is  probable  you  can  obviate.          A.  LINCOLN 
Feb.  25.  1864 

i  ALS,  RPB.  Reverdy  Johnson  wrote  Lincoln  on  February  24:  "I  take  pleas- 
ure in  introducing  to  you,  Judge  E.  P.  Pitts,  of  Va.  who  desires  to  see  you  on 
official  business  that  he  will  explain.  As  a  loyal  gentleman  he  is  most  deserv- 
ing of  your  regard."  (DLC-RTL).  Judge  Edward  P  Pitts  of  Northampton 
County,  Virginia,  had  sent  a  memorial  to  the  rebel  legislature  of  Virginia  in 
1861  stating  his  loyalty  to  the  South  (see  OR,  II,  II,  IV,  39-40,  and  passim), 

[203] 


To  Salmon  P.  Chase1 

Will  see  Mr.  Bailey  at  7.  this  evening 
Feb.  25,  1864  A-L- 

i  AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  note  from  Secretary- 
Chase  "Mr.  Bailey  has  arrived  and  will  wait  on  you  this  morning.  I  hope  it 
will  be  convenient  for  you  to  see  him."  See  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  12  and 
20,  supra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

February  25,  1864 

Let  John  Hatton,  within  alluded  to,  and  in  prison  at  Alton,  be 
discharged. 

iCopy,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  101,  Reg- 
ister notation.  This  missing  endorsement,  according  to  the  notation  in  the 
register,  referred  a  letter  of  Francis  P.  Blair,  Jr.,  requesting  Hatton's  release. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

February  25,  1864 

I  am  told  there  are  one  hundred  colored  men  at  Alexandria,  Va. 
who  wish  to  go  to  Massachusetts;  with  their  own  consent  and  the 
consent  of  Gov.  Pierpoint,  let  them  go.  A.  LiisrcoLisr 

Feby  25.  1864. 

1  Copy,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  AGO,  Colored  Troops  Division,  W  456.  The  copy 
of  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  preserved  on  a  copy  of  the  following  letter  from 
Governor  Francis  H.  Peirpoint  February  23,  1864: 

"Oliver  C.  Gibbs  Esq  of  Massachusetts,  by  request  of  Gov.  Andrew  as  he 
informs  me,  desires  to  recruit  colored  troops  in  Virginia:  to  fill  a  Massachu- 
setts regiment  in  that  state.  I  dont  see  that  I  ought  to  object  to  it.  I  have  no 
means  to  pay  this  or  any  other  class  of  soldiers  a  bounty;  and  Mr  Gibbs  in- 
forms me  that  Massachusetts  will  pay  them  $300.  Bounty. 

"There  are  other  parties  here,  recruiting  for  other  states,  who  I  learn,  ap- 
propriate or  receive  one  half  of  the  bounty  given  by  their  states,  for  enlisting. 
I  think  I  ought  to  require  all  these  parties  to  report  to  me  and  make  satisfac- 
tory arrangements  to  secure  to  these  helpless  men  their  full  bounty.  Unless 
you  advise  otherwise  I  shall  issue  a  notice  to  this  effect — and  will  respectfully 
ask  that  you  will  give  aid  in  carrying  it  out  if  the  parties  prove  refractory." 

See  Lincoln  to  Andrew,  February  18,  supra. 

To  Frederick  Steele1 

Major  General  Steele  Washington,  B.C., 

Little  Rock,  Arkansas.  Feb.  25  1864 

General  Sickles  is  not  going  to  Arkansas.  He  probably  will  make 
a  tour  down  the  Mississippi,  and  home  by  the  Gulf  and  ocean,  but 

[204] 


FEBRUARY      26,      ±864 

he  will  not  meddle  in  your  affairs.  At  one  time  I  did  intend  to 
have  him  call  on  you  and  explain  more  fully  than  I  could  do, 
by  letter  or  Telegraph,  so  as  to  avoid  a  difficulty  coming  of  my 
having  made  a  plan  here  while  the  convention  made  one  there, 
for  re-organizing  Arkansas,  but  even  his  doing  that,  has  been 
given  up  for  more  than  two  weeks.  Please  show  this  to  Gov. 
Murphy  to  save  me  Telegraphing  him.  A.  LirsrcoLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Sickles,  February  15,  supra.  On  February  24, 
Provisional  Governor  Isaac  Murphy  telegraphed  Lincoln,  "I  hope  you  will  not 
send  General  Sickles  here,  and  if  an  order  has  been  made  to  that  effect  that  it 
may  be  revoked.  His  coming  here  would  only  be  an  annoyance  and  will  do  no 
good.  Everything  is  working  well.  General  Steele  is  doing  everything  that  can 
be  done."  (OR,  III,  IV,  127-28).  A  second  telegram  of  the  same  date  signed  by 
Murphy  and  Freeman  Warner,  chairman  of  the  Executive  Committee  of 
Arkansas,  reiterated  the  request  (ibid.). 

To  Telegraph  Office1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Telegraph  Office  Washington,  Feb.  25,  1864. 

Please  show  Gov.  Johnson  my  despatch  to  some  at  at  [sz'c] 
Nashville,  Tenn.  saying  the  oath  prescribed  by  Gov.  Johnson  was 
to  be  followed — &  let  the  Gov.  have  a  copy  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DLC- Johnson  Papers.  See  Lincoln's  telegram  to  Jordan,  February  21, 
supra. 

To  Henry  D.  Terry1 

Commanding  Officer,  Executive  Mansion, 

Johnson's  Island:  Washington,  February  25,   1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  John  Marrs  until  further 
orders  and  forward  record  for  examination.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  417.  No  reply  or  further  reference  has  been  found. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington,  Feb.  26,  1864 

I  can  not  remember  at  whose  request  it  was  that  I  gave  the  pass 
to  Mrs.  Bulkley.  Of  course  detain  her,  if  the  evidence  of  her  be- 
ing a  spy  is  strong  against  her.  A.  LINCOLN 

[205] 


FEBRUARY      26,      1864 

1  ALS  RPB  General  Butler  telegraphed  on  February  25:  "Mrs  Bulldey,  to 
whom  you  gave  a  pass  to  go  through  the  lines,  is  charged  upon  strong  evi- 
dence of  being  a  spy.  I  have  detained  her  for  investigation.  Is  this  right?'* 
(DLC-RTL).  Mrs.  Bulkley  has  not  been  identified. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major-General  Butler,  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort  Monroe:  Washington,  February  26,  1864. 

If  it  has  not  already  been  done,  suspend  execution  of  death 
sentence  of  William  K.  Stearns,  Tenth  New  Hampshire  Volun- 
teers, until  further  orders  and  forward  record.  A.  LiisrcoLisr. 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch.         JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  418.  Butler  replied  on  the  same  day:  "The  Pres.  is 
respy  informed  that  no  death  sentence  will  be  executed  in  this  Dept.  for  deser- 
tion only  without  his  assent 

"As  I  understand  it  to  be  his  policy  not  to  have  such  executions 

"The  record  in  the  Stearns  case  is  already  forwarded."  (DLC-Butler  Papers). 

The  roster  of  Company  A,  Tenth  New  Hampshire  Volunteers,  lists  William 
KL.  Stearns  as  mustered  out  June  21,  1865. 

Endorsements  Concerning  Robert  T.  Van  Horn1 

Submitted  to  Gen.  Rosecrans.          A.  LiisrcoLisr 
Feb.  26.  1864 

As  the  Sec.  of  War  does  not  approve  the  above  submission,  let  the 
paper  be  filed.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  2.  1864 

*  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsements  are  written  on  a  letter  from  Governor 
Willard  P.  Hall  of  Missouri,  February  9,  1864,  asking  that  Lieutenant  Colonel 
Robert  T.  Van  Horn,  Twenty-fifth  Missouri  Infantry,  who  was  also  a  member 
of  the  State  senate  from  Jackson  County,  be  authorized  to  raise  a  brigade. 

To  William  Jayne1 

Hon.  W.  Jayne  Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Sir:  Washington,  February  26,  1864. 

I  dislike  to  make  changes  in  office  so  long  as  they  can  be  avoided. 
It  multiplies  my  trouble  and  harrassment  immensely.  I  dislike  to 
make  two  appointments  when  one  will  do.  Send  me  the  name  of 
some  man,  not  the  present  Marshal,  and  I  will  nominate  him  to 
be  Provost-Marshal  for  Dakota.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

[206] 


FEBRUARY      26,      1864 

i  ALS,  owned  by  Perry  Jayne,  Springfield,  Illinois.  Petitions  for  the  removal 
of  George  P.  Waldron,  provost  marshal  for  Dakota  Territory,  were  submitted 
by  unconditional  Union  men  of  Dakota  on  September  9,  1863,  and  January  11, 
1864  (DLC-RTL).  Letters  from  William  Jayne,  congressional  delegate  from 
the  territory  (February  3),  Representative  Asahel  W.  Hubbard  of  Iowa  (Feb- 
ruary 27),  and  James  M.  Edmunds  of  the  General  Land  Office  (February  28), 
recommended  appointment  of  George  M.  Pinney,  U.S.  Marshal  for  the  Ter- 
ritory, to  replace  Waldron  as  provost  marshal.  Although  orders  removing 
Waldron  and  appointing  Pinney  under  date  of  March  2  were  sent  to  Lincoln 
by  James  B.  Fry  on  March  4,  Lincoln  merely  filed  the  letter  with  the  endorse- 
ment "William  Jayne — about  Dakotah  affairs."  On  April  21,  Fry  wrote  Nico- 
lay,  "I  enclose  herewith,  a  letter  from  Capt.  George  M.  Pinney,  dated  Yankton 
D.T.  April  ist.  1864,  by  which  it  will  be  seen,  that  his  appointment  as  Provost 
Marshal,  Dakota  Territory,  had  not  reached  him  at  that  date.  It  was  forwarded 
to  His  Excellency  the  Present,  on  the  4th.  of  March  last,  and  the  revocation 
of  the  appointment  of  Mr  Waldron  as  Provost  Marshal  of  Dakota  Territory, 
was  also  forwarded  at  the  same  time,  as  directed  by  the  President.  Can  you 
give  me  any  information  as  to  when  and  where  they  were  mailed.  .  .  ." 
(Ibid.). 

No  reply  has  been  found,  but  Waldron  remained  in  office  until  honorably 
discharged  on  May  20,  1865.  See  Lincoln  to  Bates,  March  i,  infra,  concerning 
the  replacement  of  Pinney  as  U.S.  marshal. 


Memorandum  Concerning  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

February  26,  1864 

Col  Shaffer  has  been  conversing  with  me  and  I  have  said  to  him 
that  Genl  Butler  has  my  confidence  in  his  ability  and  fidelity  to 
the  country  and  to  ra#  and  I  wish  him  sustained  in  all  his  efforts 
in  our  great  common  cause  subject  only  to  the  same  supervisions 
which  the  Government  must  take  with  all  Department  Command- 
ers A  LINCOLN 
Feby  26.  1864 

1  Copy,  DLC-Butler  Papers.  The  copy  of  Lincoln's  memorandum  'was  en- 
closed with  a  letter  to  Butler  from  Colonel  John  W.  Shaffer,  Butler's  chief  of 
staff,  dated  "Saturday  Morning"  (February  27,  1864): 

"I  yester[day]  had  a  long  and  very  satisfactory  talk  with  Mr  Lincoln  and  I 
think  I  have  done  all  I  came  to  do.  I  inclose  you  a  copy  of  the  statement 
Mr  L.  made  on  paper,  he  talked  very  decidedly  in  your  favor 

"I  will  try  and  arrange  business  at  War  Office  to  day,  and  get  home  Monday 
or  Tuesday." 

As  printed  in  Private  and  Official  Correspondence  of  Benjamin  F.  Butler, 
IV,  547-48,  Shaffer's  letter  is  dated  July  27,  1864,  and  Lincoln's  enclosure  July 
26,  1864.  In  the  absence  of  Lincoln's  original  memorandum,  the  date  cannot 
be  certified,  but  a  letter  from  Butler  to  Lincoln,  February  24,  1864,  seems  to 
confirm  the  February  date  by  requesting  a  statement  of  Lincoln's  confidence. 
Jared  D.  Thompson  of  New  Haven,  Connecticut,  had  sworn  under  oath  that 
Lincoln  said  "I  think  you  agree  with  me  that  General  Butler  is  not  fit  to  have 
a  command."  Butler  continued,  "My  only  desire  is  that  the  President  will  say 
that  this  supposed  conversation  did  not  take  place,  so  that  I  may  properly  pun- 
ish this  retailer  of  slander.  .  .  ."  (Op.  cit.9  III,  464-65). 

[207] 


Order  Commuting  Sentence  of  Deserters1 

General  Orders,  No.  76. 
War  Department,  Adjutant-General's  Off! 

Washington,  February  26,   1864. 

Sentence  of  Deserters. 

The  President  directs  that  the  sentences  of  all  deserters,  who 
have  been  condemned  by  Court  Martial  to  death,  and  that  have 
not  been  otherwise  acted  upon  by  him,  be  mitigated  to  imprison- 
ment during  the  war,  at  the  Dry  Tortugas,  Florida,  where  they 
will  be  sent  under  suitable  guards  by  orders  from  army  command- 
ers. 

The  Commanding  Generals,  who  have  power  to  act  on  pro- 
ceedings of  Courts  Martial  in  such  cases,  are  authorized  in  special 
cases  to  restore  to  duty  deserters  under  sentence,  when  in  their 
judgment  the  service  will  be  thereby  benefited. 

Copies  of  all  orders  issued  under  the  foregoing  instructions  will 
be  immediately  forwarded  to  the  Adjutant  General  and  to  the 
Judge  Advocate  General. 

By  order  of  the  Secretary  of  War:          E.  D.  TOWNSEND, 

Assistant  Adjutant-General. 

1  AGO  General  Orders  No.  76,  February  26,  1864.  If  Lincoln  issued  his  di- 
rection in  writing,  the  document  has  not  been  discovered,  but  the  explicit  nature 
of  the  order  dictates  its  inclusion  here. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir.  Washington,  Feb.  26,  1864. 

Allow  Howard  D.  O'Neill,  now  a  prisoner  at  Old  Capitol  Prison 
to  take  the  oath  of  Dec.  8.  and  be  discharged.  Yours  truly 

A. 


1  ALS,  DLC-Hitchcock  Papers.  The  letter  is  endorsed  by  Stanton  referring 
to  "Major  Genl  Hitchcock  to  execute  this  order."  Howard  D.  O'Neill  of  Ohio 
was  a  supporter  of  Clement  L.  Vallandigham. 

To  John  W.  Davidson1 

Gen.  Davidson  Washington,  B.C., 

Cairo,  Ills.  Feb.  27.  1864 

Whether  you  shall  visit  Washington  I  must  submit  to  the  Gen- 
eral-in-chief  A 


1  ALS,  RPB.  Brigadier  General  John  W.  Davidson  was  relieved  of  his  com- 
mand at  Little  Rock,  Arkansas,  by  request  of  General  Frederick  Steele  to  Hal- 
leek,  January  28,  1864:  "...  I  ask  authority  to  relieve  General  Davidson 

[208] 


FEBRUARY      27,      1864 

from  my  command.  He  is  the  only  discordant  element  in  it.  He  will  intrigue 
against  me."  (OR,  I,  XXXIV,  II,  175).  On  February  26,  Davidson  telegraphed 
Lincoln  from  Cairo,  Illinois: 

"I  desire  to  come  to  Washn.  I  have  facts  to  lay  before  the  Judge  Advo- 
cate General  I  have  been  relieved  of  a  command  I  had  formed  &  no  reason 
assigned  known  to  me.  I  have  to  send  you  the  following  telegram  from  Gov. 
Murphy  I  did  not  send  it  from  Little  Rock  because  I  did  not  wish  to  add  to 

your  anxiety  about  the  discords  there — 'Little  Rock  Ark,  Feby  15th.  1864 

To  A.  Lincoln  Prest  U.S. — 

"  'Genl  Davidson  is  a  true  man  &  soldier  a  patriot  in  whom  the  uncondi- 
tional Union  men  of  Arkansas  trust  with  unlimited  confidence  any  action 
against  him  will  be  against  the  Union  Element  here  &  against  your  own  pol- 
icy. This,  an  investigation  will  show.  Isaac  Murphy  Pro.  Gover.  of  Arkansas'  I 
cannot  do  duty  with  Honor  until  this  question  of  the  insult  put  upon  me  by 
Genl  Steele  be  investigated.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

On  June  26,  1864,  General  Davidson  was  placed  in  command  as  chief  of 
cavalry  in  the  Military  Division  of  the  West  Mississippi. 

To  Edward  H.  East1 

Hon  E.  H.  East  Washington, 

Secretary  of  State,  Nashville,  Tenn.:  February  27,  1864. 

Your  telegram  of  the  26th  instant  asking  for  a  copy  of  my  dis- 
patch to  Warren  Jordan,  esq.,  at  Nashville  Press  office,  has  just 
been  referred  to  me  by  Governor  Johnson.  In  my  reply  to  Mr. 
Jordan,  which  was  brief  and  hurried,  I  intended  to  say  that  in  the 
county  and  State  elections  of  Tennessee  the  oath  prescribed  in 
the  proclamation  of  Governor  Johnson  on  the  26th  of  January, 
1864,  ordering  an  election  in  Tennessee  on  the  first  Saturday  in 
March  next,  is  entirely  satisfactory  to  me  as  a  test  of  loyalty  of 
all  persons  proposing  or  offering  to  vote  in  said  elections,  and 
coming  from  him  would  better  be  observed  and  followed.  There 
is  no  conflict  between  the  oath  of  amnesty  in  my  proclamation  of 
8th  December,  1863,  and  that  prescribed  by  Governor  Johnson  in 
his  proclamation  of  the  26th  ultimo.  No  person  -who  has  taken  the 
oath  of  amnesty  of  8th  December,  1863,  and  obtained  a  pardon 
thereby,  and  who  intends  to  observe  the  same  in  good  faith,  should 
have  any  objection  to  taking  that  prescribed  by  Governor  Johnson 
as  a  test  of  loyalty.  I  have  seen  and  examined  Governor  Johnson's 
proclamation,  and  am  entirely  satisfied  with  his  plan,  which  is  to 
restore  the  State  government  and  place  it  under  the  control  of  citi- 
zens truly  loyal  to  the  Government  of  the  United  States. 

A.  LmcoLisr. 

Please  send  above  for  Governor  Johnson.2          A.  L. 

1  OR,  III,  IV,  141.  See  Lincoln's  note  to  the  Telegraph  Office,  February  25, 
and  telegram  to  Jordan,  February  21,  supra. 

2  In   the   source   Lincoln's   telegram  to   East   is   followed  by   a   certification 

[209] 


FEBRUARY      27,      1864 

signed  by  Charles  A.   Tinker,  March   i,    1864,   and   a   postscript  by  Andrew 

Johnson:  .  ,.  , 

"I  certify  that  the  above  telegram  is  a  verbatim  copy  of  a  dispatch  for- 
warded this  day  to  Nashville,  Tenn.,  and  now  on  file  in  this  office. 

"CHAS.  A.   TINKER, 

"Cipher  Clerk. 

"P.S Please  send  copy  of  foregoing  telegram  to  James  B.  Bingham,  Memphis, 

Tenn.,  and  oblige,  ANDREW  JOHNSON 

"Military  Governor  of  Tennessee." 

Memorandum:  Appointment  of  George  W.  Pyle1 

I  specially  desire  this  case  to  be  called  to  my  attention  when  we 
act  upon  this  class  of  cases.  A.  LINCOLN 

Feb.  27.  1864 
West-Point. 

1AES,  DNA  WB  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1864,  No.  128.  George 
W.  Pyle  of  College  Hill,  Ohio,  appointed  at  large,  entered  \Vest  Point  on  July 
i,  1864,  and  graduated  in  1868. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

Sir  Washington,  Feb.  27,   1864. 

You  ask  some  instruction  from  me  in  relation  to  the  Report  of 
Special  Commission,2  constituted  by  an  order  of  the  War  Depart- 
ment, dated  Dec.  5  1863,  "to  revise  the  enrolment  &  quotas  of 
the  City  &  State  of  New- York,  &  report  whether  there  be  any  & 
what  errors,  or  irregularities  therein,  and  what  corrections,  if  any 
should  be  made."  [The  aspect  of  this  case,  as  presented  by  this 
order  and  report,  is  entirely  new  to  me,  I  having  personally  known 
nothing  of  the  order,  commission,  or  report,  until  now  presented 
for  my  consideration.]  In  the  correspondence  between  the  Gov- 
ernor of  New- York  and  myself  last  summer,  I  understood  him  to 
complain  that  the  enrolments  in  several  of  the  Districts  of  that 
State  had  been  neither  accurately  nor  honestly  made;  and,  in 
view  of  this  I  for  the  draft  then  immediately  ensuing,  ordered  an 
arbitrary  reduction  of  the  quotas  in  several  of  the  Districts,  where- 
in they  seemed  too  large,  [for  the  draft  then  immediately  ensu- 
ing,] and  said  "After  this  drawing  these  four  Districts  and  also  the 
seventeenth  and  twentyninth  shall  be  carefully  re-enrolled,  and,  if 
you  please,  agents  of  yours  may  witness  every  step  of  the  process" 
In  a  subsequent  letter  I  believe  some  additional  Districts  were  put 
into  the  list  of  those  to  be  re-enrolled.  My  idea  was  to  do  the  work 
over,  according  to  the  law,  in  presence  of  the  complaining  party, 
and  thereby  to  correct  anything  which  might  be  found  amiss.  The 

[210] 


FEBRUARY      27,      ±864 

Commission,  whose  work  I  am  considering,  seem  to  have  pro- 
ceeded upon  a  totally  different  idea.  Not  going  forth  to  find  men 
at  all,  they  have  proceeded  altogether  upon  paper  examinations 
and  mental  processes.  One  of  their  conclusions,  as  I  understand  is, 
that  as  the  law  stands,  and  attempting  to  follow  it,  the  e[n]  rolling 
officers  could  not  have  made  the  enrolments  much  more  accurately 
than  they  did.  The  report,  on  this  point,  might  be  useful  to  Con- 
gress. 

The  Commission  conclude  that  the  quotas  for  the  draft  should 
be  based  upon  entire  population,  and  they  proceed  upon  this  basis 
to  give  a  table  for  the  State  of  New- York,  in  which  some  districts 
are  reduced,  and  some  increased.  For  the  now  ensuing  draft,  let 
the  quotas  stand  as  made  by  the  enrolling  officers,  in  the  Districts 
wherein  this  table  requires  them  to  be  increased;  and  let  them  be 
reduced  according  to  the  table,  in  the  others.  This  to  be  no  prece- 
dent for  subsequent  action;  but  as  I  think  this  report  may,  on  full 
consideration,  be  shown  to  have  much  that  is  valuable  in  it,  I 
suggest  that  such  consideration  be  given  it;  and  that  it  be  especial- 
ly considered  whether  it's  suggestions  can  be  conformed  to  without 
an  alteration  of  the  law.  Yours  truly  A.  LIN-COLT* 

1  ALS,  DLC-Stanton  Papers.  Portions  enclosed  in  brackets  appear  as  deleted 
in  the  manuscript,  presumably  by  Lincoln.  As  printed  in  the  Official  Records 
(III,  IV,   139-40)    this  letter  is  endorsed  by   Stanton   on  February  27,    1864: 
"Referred  to  Colonel   Fry  .  .  .  with  directions  to  make  the  ensuing  draft  in 
New  York  in  conformity  with  the  instructions  of  the  President,  herein  con- 
tained." 

2  Members  of  the  commission  were:  William  F.  Allen  of  New  York,  John 
Love  of  Indiana,  and  Chauncey  Smith  of  Massachusetts. 

To  George  H.  Thomas1 

Maj.  Gen.  George  H.  Thomas,  Executive  Mansion, 

Department  of  Cumberland:       Washington,  February  27,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  F.  W.  Lanferseick,  first2 
corporal,  Company  D,  One  hundred  and  sixth  Regiment  Ohio 
Volunteers,  until  further  orders,  and  forward  record  for  examin- 
ation. A.  LINCOLN. 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  418.  Headquarters  Department  of  the  Cumberland, 
General  Orders  No.  *o9  January  10,  1864,  lists  Corporal  F.  W.  Lanferseick  to 
be  shot  for  desertion. 

2  An  error  which  occurred  because  Corporal  Lanferseick  was  listed  first  of 
the  two  men  sentenced:  "ist.  Cpl.  F.  W.  Lanferseick." 

[211] 


To  Lorenzo  Thomas1 

Gen.  L.  Thomas  Washington,  B.C., 

Louisville,  Ky.  Feb-  28*  l864- 

I  see  your  despatch  of  yesterday  to  the  Sec.  of  War.  I  wish  you 
would  go  to  the  Mississippi  river  at  once,  and  take  hold  of,  and  be 
master  in,  the  contraband  and  leasing  business.  You  understand 
it  better  than  any  other  man  does.  Mr.  Mellen's2  system  doubtless 
is  well  intended;  but,  from  what  I  hear,  I  fear  that,  if  persisted 
in,  it  would  fall  dead  within  it's  own  entangling  details.  Go  there, 
and  be  the  judge.  A  Mr.  Lewis8  will  probably  follow  you  with 
something  from  me  on  this  subject,  but  do  not  wait  for  him.  Nor 
is  this  to  induce  you  to  violate  or  neglect  any  Military  order  from 
the  General-in-Chief,  or  Secretary  of  War.  A.  LINTCOLTST 

1  ALS,  RPB.  On  February  27,  Lorenzo  Thomas  telegraphed  Stanton:   "I  ar- 
rived here  this  morning.  In  my  letter  of  the  ist  instant  I  requested  instruc- 
tions respecting  the  First  Artillery  Regiment  Colored  Troops,  to  be  raised  at 
Paducah,  Ky.  Shall  I  proceed  with  its  organization?  I  will  await  your  instruc- 
tions here.  It  is  very  important  that  I  should  proceed  down  the  Mississippi  as 
soon  as  possible.  ...  If  the  Treasury  agent  should  insist  on  carrying  out  his 
regulations  for  leasing  abandoned  plantations  and  furnishing  hands,   none  of 
the  blacks  can  be  provided  for.  If,  however,  the  scale  of  wages  and  the  rogula- 
tions  adopted  by  Superintendent  Eaton  [John  Eaton,  superintendent  of  Freed- 
men],   approved  by  Major-General   Grant   and  myself,   be    adopted,    and   the 
control  be  continued  by  the  military  authorities,   there   is   yet   time   to   lease 
plantations  by  the  Treasury  agent  and  provide  for  a  vast  amount  of  labor.  May 
I  request  an  early  reply?  .  .  ."  (OR,  III,  IV,  138). 

2  William  P.  Mellen,  treasury  agent. 

8  See  Lincoln's  letter  to  Alpheus  Lewis,  January  23,  supra. 

To  George  Bancroft1 

Hon.  George  Bancroft  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  Feb.  29.  1864. 

Herewith  is  the  copy  of  the  manuscript  which  you  did  me  the 
honor  to  request.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN*. 

1 ALS-P,  ISLA.  No  letter  of  Bancroft  requesting  the  manuscript  of  the 
Gettysburg  Address  has  been  discovered.  Perhaps  he  made  the  request  in  per- 
son, on  behalf  of  the  committee  for  the  Baltimore  Sanitary  Fair.  See  notes  to 
the  Gettysburg  Address,  November  19,  1863,  supra. 

To  Salmon  R  Chase1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  February  29.   1864. 

I  would  have  taken  time  to  answer  yours  of  the  22nd.  sooner, 
only  that  I  did  not  suppose  any  evil  could  result  from  the  delay, 
especially  as,  by  a  note,  I  promptly  acknowledged]  the  receipt  of 

[212] 


FEBRUARY      2Q,     ±864 

yours,  and  promised  a  fuller  answer.  Now,  on  consideration,  I  find 
there  is  really  very  little  to  say.  My  knowledge  of  Mr.  Pomeroy's 
letter  having  been  made  public  came  to  me  only  the  day  you 
wrote;  but  I  had,  in  spite  of  myself,  known  of  it's  existence  several 
days  before.  I  have  not  yet  read  it,  and  I  think  I  shall  not.  I  was 
not  shocked,  or  surprised  by  the  appearance  of  the  letter,  because 
I  had  had  knowledge  of  Mr.  Pomeroy's  Committee,  and  of  secret 
issues  which  I  supposed  came  from  it,  and  of  secret  agents  who 
I  supposed  were  sent  out  by  it,  for  several  weeks.  I  have  known 
just  as  little  of  these  things  as  my  own  friends  have  allowed  me 
to  know.  They  bring  the  documents  to  me,  but  I  do  not  read  them 
— they  tell  me  what  they  think  fit  to  tell  me,  but  I  do  not  inquire 
for  more.  I  fully  concur  with  you  that  neither  of  us  can  be  justly 
held  responsible  for  what  our  respective  friends  may  do  without 
our  instigation  or  countenance;  and  I  assure  you,  as  you  have 
assured  me,  that  no  assault  has  been  made  upon  you  by  my  in- 
stigation, or  with  my  countenance. 

Whether  you  shall  remain  at  the  head  of  the  Treasury  Depart- 
ment is  a  question  which  I  will  not  allow  myself  to  consider  from 
any  stand-point  other  than  my  judgment  of  the  public  service; 
and,  in  that  view,  I  do  not  perceive  occasion  for  a  change.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN- 

1ALS  (copy  or  ADfS?),  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Chase,  February  23, 
supra. 

To  John  A.  Dix1 

Major  General  Dix  Executive  Mansion, 

New- York  Washington,  Feb.  29,  1864. 

Do  you  advise  that  John  McKee,  now  in  Military  confinement 
at  Fort-Lafayette,  be  turned  over  to  the  Civil  authorities? 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  No  reply  or  further  reference  to  John  McKee  has  been  dis- 
covered. 

Draft  of  Order  Concerning  Samuel  L.  Casey1 

Washington  D.C.  Feb  29  1864 

Whereas  Samuel  L  Casey  of  Kentucky  has  made  the  following 
statements  to  me  that  John  Bishop  John  Ray,  S.  Baker  S.  C. 
Floyd  Thos  M  Watts  and  John  B  Shepard  of  Louisiana  Thos. 
S.  Halloway  and  Joseph  Turnage  of  Arkansas — William  Butler  of 
Illinois  and  him  self  and  Peter  Casey  all  Loyal  men  are  the  own- 
ers of  a  large  amount  of  cotton  on  the  Red  River  and  its  tributar- 

[213] 


FEBRUARY      2  Q,     1864 

ies.  Some  of  the  cotton  is  with  in  our  Military  lines  and  a  good 
deal  within  our  trading  lines,  but  all  will  have  to  pass  into  the 
Red  River  to  reach  a  market  or  a  place  of  safety  and  as  orders 
have  been  given  by  the  commander  of  the  confederate  forces  of 
that  Department  to  destroy  all  the  cotton  should  the  Federal  army 
attempt  to  occupy  that  part  of  the  country,  believing  that  it 
would  be  a  public  injury  to  have  the  cotton  destroyed,  and  having 
confidence  in  the  integrity  and  ability  of  William  Butler  of  Illi- 
nois and  Samuel  L  Casey  of  Kentucky  they  are  hereby  authorised 
to  take  charge  of — by  the  consent  of  the  owners — and  to  convey 
to  market  or  a  place  of  safety  said  cotton  under  the  regulations 
governing  trade  in  the  insurrectionary  states  adopted  23  of  Janu- 
ary 1864  and  may  sell  the  same  receiving  payment  in  full  except 
the  fees  and  taxes  charged  by  the  Treasury  Department  and  all 
Military  and  Naval  commanders  are  hereby  directed  to  give  all 
Steam  Boats  in  charge  of  said  Butler  or  Casey  all  necessary  pro- 
tection to  and  from  their  places  of  destination 

1  Df,  DLC-RTL.  The  draft  is  by  Casey.  Although  there  is  no  record  of  Lin- 
coln's having  issued  such  an  order,  the  order  given  to  Casey  on  December  14, 
1863,  supra,  and  a  letter  from  Casey  to  Lincoln  February  25,  1864  (DLC- 
RTL)  suggest  the  probability  that  Lincoln  may  have  signed  such  an  order  on 
February  29,  1864. 

To  the  House  of  Representatives1 

To  the  House  of  Representatives:  February  29,  1864 

In  answer  to  the  Resolution  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of 
the  26th.  instant,  I  transmit  herewith  a  report  from  the  Secretary 
of  War  relative  to  the  re-enlistment  of  Veteran  Volunteers. 
Washington,  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

February  2gth.  1864. 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  44.  Stanton  reported 
that  "it  would  be  prejudicial  to  the  public  service  to  transmit  ...  at  the  pres- 
ent time,  the  information  requested." 

To  Frederick  F.  Low1 

Gov.  Lowe.  Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 

My  dear  Sir  Feb.   29,   1864. 

Judge  Hughes  of  the  Claims  Court  here,  has  a  Step-Son — 
William  B.  Barnes, — a  private  in  a  California  regiment,  and  now 
at  Benicia  Barracks,  whom  he  wishes  appointed  a  Captain  in  his 
regiment  or  some  other  if  possible;  and  I  shall  be  personally 
obliged  if  you  will  make  the  appointment.  Yours  truly 

A 

[214] 


MARC  H      1,      1864 

1ALS,  Archives  and  Central  Record  Depository,  Sacramento,  California. 
William  B.  Barnes,  stepson  of  Judge  James  Hughes,  -was  promoted  to  second 
lieutenant  of  Company  E,  Sixth  California  Infantry  on  May  23,  1864,  and  re- 
signed on  November  15,  1864. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  February  [29],  1864 

I  communicate  to  the  Senate  herewith,  for  its  constitutional 
action  thereon,  the  articles  of  agreement  and  convention  made 
and  concluded  at  the  city  of  Washington,  on  the  25th  day  of  the 
present  month,  by  and  between  William  E  Dole  as  commissioner 
on  the  part  of  the  United  States,  and  the  duly  authorized  delegates 
of  the  Swan  Creek  and  Black  River  Chippewas,  and  the  Munsees 
or  Christian  Indians  in  Kansas.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLJN-. 

Executive  Mansion,  February — ,  1864. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  427.  This  communication  was  received  by  the 
Senate  on  February  29,  1864.  Referred  to  the  committee  on  Indian  affairs  the 
treaty  was  reported  without  amendment  on  April  7,  1864,  but  failed  to  be 
ratified. 


To  Cadwallader  C.  Washburn1 

Maj.  Genl.  C.  C.  Washburne 
La  Crosse,  Wis. 

Your  leave  is  extended  twenty  days.          A. 
Feb.  29.  1864 

l  LS-P,  ISLA.  Only  the  date  and  signature  of  this  telegram  are  in  Lincoln's 
handwriting.  See  Lincoln  to  Washburn,  January  23,  supra. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  i,  1864. 

Please  send  me  a  nomination  for  John  C.  Smart  to  be  Marshal 
for  Dakota  Territory  in  place  of  George  M.  Pinney,  transferred 
to  be  Provost-Marshal.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  the  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lin- 
coln Material.  See  Lincoln  to  Jayne,  February  26,  supra.  On  February  27, 
J.  P.  Williston,  U.S.  Judge,  Dakota  Territory,  recommended  John  C.  Smart  to 
William  Jayne,  and  Jayne  forwarded  Williston's  letter  to  Lincoln  with  his  own 
endorsement  that  "He  has  been  the  deputy  marshal  for  five  years  past — he 
will  make  an  honest  &  efficient  officer."  (DLC-RTL).  A  letter  of  nomination 
for  Smart,  March  2,  1864,  never  signed  or  sent  to  the  Senate,  is  in  the  Lincoln 
Papers. 

[215] 


To  James  G.  Benton1 

I  do  not  sign  the  above  in  the  form  written;  and  yet  if  it  can  be 
conveniently  done  I  shall  be  obliged.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  i.  1864 

i  AES,  owned  by  Louis  B.  Souter,  Long  Beach,  California.  Lincoln's  endorse- 
ment is  written  on  an  order  to  Captain  James  G.  Benton,  Washington  Arsenal, 
which  is  as  follows:  "You  will  finish  the  trial  of  the  Absterdam  projectile  by 
fireing  the  shell  with  time  fuses  for  my  friend  A.  C.  Dickson  and  report  im- 
mediately to  Brigr  Genl  Ramsey."  See  further,  Lincoln  to  Ramsay,  March  7 
and  10,  infra. 

Memorandum:  Appointment  of  Henry  R  Torsey1 

[c.  March  i,  1864] 

The  Vice-President  says  I  promised  to  make  this  appointment,  &  I 
suppose  I  must  make  it. 

*AE,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Appointments,  Box  393.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  letter  from  Hannibal  Hamlin,  March  i,  1864,  recommending 
Henry  P.  Torsey  of  Readfield,  Maine,  for  appointment  as  secretary  of  "one  of 
the  Territories."  Torsey's  appointment  as  secretary  of  Montana  was  confirmed 
by  the  Senate  on  June  22,  1864. 


Memorandum  Concerning  Charles  Garretson1 

[c.  March  i,  1864] 
A 

York  Union  League  says  G.  is  "ultra  copperhead'9  &  has  no  sym- 
pathy with  the  Government.  Appoints  under  him,  "bitter  ene- 
mies"— Calvin  B.  Rhoads,  George  L.  Jacoby,  William  Garretson. 
Martin  Quinn  &  Joseph  Ruby. 

B 

Hon.  Thadeus  Stevens  says  he  is  well  acquainted  with  G.  &  sub- 
ordinates— that  he  has  always  been  disloyal  since  the  war  began, 

C 

Union  League  says  G's  bondsmen  are  copperheads — that  he,  G. 
left  the  State  rather  than  vote  for  Curtin — and  was  outspoken, 
loud-mouthed  copperhead — has  made  money  out  of  his  position. 

D. 

H.  H.  Jacobs  says,  G's  partizans  knocked  down  and  dragged  tc 
prison,  soldiers  for  cheering  for  Lincoln  and  Curtin,  and  that  Cal- 
vin Rhoads  and  Martin  Quinn  were  Marshals  &  participated  ir 
it — that  George  L.  Jacoby  painted  carricatures  of  L  &  C,  thai 
William  Garretson  cheered  Early's  men  when  they  marched 

[216] 


MARCH      1,      1864 

through  York — that  G.  very  well  knew  these  men  &  got  his  bonds- 
men by  promising  to  take  these  men  in  his  employ,  that  G's  own 
language  proves  him  as  disloyal  as  any  man  can  be. 

E 
Resolutions  of  Copperhead  conventions  not  naming  G. 

F. 
Mr.  Edmunds  letter  transmitting  papers. 

1  AD,  DLC-RTL.  James  M.  Edmunds,  Grand  President,  Union  League  of 
America,  wrote  Stanton  on  March  i,  1864,  forwarding  testimony  concerning 
the  disloyalty  of  Captain  Charles  Garretson,  assistant  quartermaster,  furnished 
by  the  Union  League  of  York,  Pennsylvania,  and  others.  On  March  5,  Garret- 
son  was  "By  direction  of  the  President  .  .  .  dismissed  the  service  of  the  United 
States  .  .  .  for  disloyalty  to  the  Government"  (AGO  Special  Orders  No. 
See  further,  Lincoln's  note  to  Stanton,  March  7,  infra. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War —  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March,   i,  1864. 

A  poor  widow,  by  the  name  of  Baird,  has  a  son  in  the  Army, 
that  for  some  offence  has  been  sentenced  to  serve  a  long  time 
without  pay,  or  at  most,  with  very  little  pay.  I  do  not  like  this 
punishment  of  withholding  pay — it  falls  so  very  hard  upon  poor 
families.  After  he  has  been  serving  in  this  way  for  several  months, 
at  the  tearful  appeal  of  the  poor  Mother,  I  made  a  direction  that 
he  be  allowed  to  enlist  for  a  new  term,  on  the  same  conditions  as 
others.  She  now  comes,  and  says  she  can  not  get  it  acted  upon. 
Please  do  it.  Yours  truly  A  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  IHi.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  August  12,  1863,  supra.  Isaac  E  Baird 
was  transferred  to  the  One  Hundred  Eighty-third  Pennsylvania  Volunteers  on 
July  19,  1864,  and  served  until  discharged  on  May  30,  1865. 


To  Lorenzo  Thomas1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Genl.  L.  Thomas:  Washington,  March  i,  1864. 

This  introduces  Mr.  Lewis,  mentioned  in  my  despatch  sent  you 
at  Louisville  some  days  ago.  I  have  but  little  personal  acquaint- 
ance with  him;  lout  he  has  the  confidence  of  several  members  of 
Congress  here  who  seem  to  know  him  well.  He  hopes  to  be  useful, 
without  charge  to  the  government,  in  facilitating  the  introduction 
of  the  free-labor  system  on  the  Mississippi  plantations.  He  is  ac- 
quainted with,  and  has  access  to,  many  of  the  planters  who  wish 

[217] 


MARCH      2,      1864 

to  adopt  this  system.  He  will  show  you  two  letters  of  mine  on 
this  subject,  one  somewhat  general,  and  the  other  relating  to 
named  persons.  They  are  not  different  in  principle.  He  will  also 
show  you  some  suggestions  coming  from  some  of  the  planters 
themselves.  I  desire  that  all  I  promise  in  these  letters  so  far  as 
practicable,  may  be,  in  good  faith,  carried  out,  and  that  sugges- 
tions from  the  planters  may  be  heard,  and  adopted,  so  far  as  they 
may  not  contravene  the  principles  stated,  nor  justice,  or  fairness 
to  the  laborers.  I  do  not  herein  intend  to  over-rule  your  own  ma- 
ture judgment  on  any  point.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

l  ADf  S,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln's  letters  to  Thomas,  February  28,  and  to 
Lewis,  Field  and  Clay,  January  23,  supra.  On  March  30,  Lorenzo  Thomas 
wrote  Lincoln  as  follows: 

"A  short  time  since  Mr  A.  Lewis  presented  a  letter  from  you  to  me  at 
Vicksburg  introducing  him  as  a  capable  person  to  facilitate  me  in  my  opera- 
tions regarding  the  plantation  system,  as  carried  on  in  this  region  of  coun- 
try I  conferred  with  Mr  Lewis  at  length  and  assured  him  that  any  arrange- 
ment that  he  and  Mr  [William  K]  Mellen,  the  Supervising  agent  might  make 
to  carry  out  the  views  of  the  Administration  would  be  sustained  by  me.  With 
this  understanding  Mr  Lewis  proceeded  up  the  river  to  confer  with  Mr  Mellen. 
To-day  I  received  a  second  visit  from  Mr  Lewis,  and  also  a  communication 
from  Mr.  Mellen.  From  the  letter  I  understand  that  Mr  Lewis  has  promised 
to  insure  planters  owning  their  own  estates  protection,  but  that  he  proposes 
to  tax  each  of  them  five  per  cent  on  the  crops  raised  by  them  in  consideration 
of  such  protection  being  given,  and  for  his  services  in  consideration  therewith. 

"My  plan  is  to  encourage  all  to  cultivate  their  estates,  and  to  afford  protec- 
tion as  far  as  it  can  properly  be  given,  they  working  under  the  system  adopted; 
and  I  cannot  admit  the  policy  of  their  paying  for  any  protection  given,  to  any 
individual,  and  therefore  I  cannot  sanction  Mr  Lewis'  plan  Indeed  I  desire 
no  assistance  outside  of  the  Treasury  Agents,  and  the  Military  authorities  now 
charged  with  the  work.  It  seems  to  me  that  Mr  Lewis'  plan  is  a  selfish  one, 
having  his  own  interest  at  stake,  and  I  can  hardly  suppose  he  fully  explained 
his  views  to  you"  (DLC-RTL)  . 

On  April  13,  John  Hay  wrote  Thomas: 

"The  President  directs  me  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  favor  of  the 
30th  March,  and  to  state  in  reply  that  Mr  Lewis  has  no  authorization  from 
him  for  any  such  purpose  as  you  mention.  He  gave  to  Mr  Lewis  a  letter  in- 
troducing him  to  you,  at  the  request  of  some  very  respectable  gentlemen  from 
Kentucky,  and  here  his  responsibility  for  Mr  Lewis  terminated. 

"The  President  does  not  wish  you  to  be  hampered  in  the  execution  of  your 
duties  by  any  consideration  of  the  letter  given  by  himself  to  Mr.  Lewis." 
(Ibid.) 

To  Edward  Bates1 

If  Attorney-General  concurs,  let  a  pardon  be  made  out  in  this  case. 
March.  2.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 


CSmH.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Reuben 
Shultz,  Gentry  County,  Missouri,  to  Representative  Austin  A.  King,  January 
21,  1864,  asking  executive  clemency.  Shultz  had  been  a  member  of  the  Seces- 
sion Legislature  at  Neosho,  Missouri,  in  1861. 

[218] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  send  nomination  according  to  the  within 
March  2.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1AES,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  signed  by  Henry  B. 
Anthony  and  others,  March  2,  1864,  asking  appointment  of  Robert  Sherman  of 
Pawtucket,  Rhode  Island,  as  U.S.  Marshal.  See  Lincoln  to  Bates,  March  5, 
infra. 

To  Daniel  Breck1 

Judge  D.  Breck  Executive  Mansion 

Richmond,  Ky  Washington,  March  2,  1864 

I  have  directed  the  officer  at  Knoxville  to  allow  Mrs.  Rumsey2  to 
come  to  you.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  Judge  Daniel  Breck  wrote  Representative  William  H.  Randall 
on  February  22,  1864:  "My  Daughter,  Anna  Maria  Ramsey,  the  wife  of  Dr. 
F.  A.  Ramsey,  with  her  six  daughters,  ...  is  now  at  his  residence  in  Knox- 
ville, Ten.  Her  Husband  is  a  Medical  Director  their  only  son  an  officer  in  the 
Rebel  Army.  She  has  been  ordered  to  leave  with  her  children  &  go  South 
within  the  rebel  lines,  having  failed  to  take  the  oath.  .  .  .  The  order  has  been 
temporarily  suspended.  She  was  willing  to  take  the  oath  with  the  consent  of 
her  husband,  but  being  a  loyal  wife  she  doubted  the  propriety  of  doing  so 
without  it.  To  obtain  his  consent  is  impracticable,  for  even  if  willing,  he  could 
not  safely  give  it  in  his  present  situation,  I  think  the  most  desirable  &  natural 
shelter  for  her  &  her  children  under  the  circumstances  is  her  father's  roof — 
and  indeed  the  safest  for  the  Union  cause,  as  you  know  her  father  is  a  Union 
man.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL).  See  Lincoln  to  Tillson,  infra. 

2  Presumably  Lincoln  misspelled  the  name  here  as  well  as  in  the  telegram 
to  Tillson.  Judge  Breck's  letter  clearly  reads  *'Ramsey." 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  examine  and  report  on  this  case. 
March  2.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  977.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  record  of  John  O'Connell  of  Cincinnati,  sentenced 
to  be  hanged  for  disloyal  practice.-  O'Connell  claimed  to  be  an  alien.  See  fur- 
ther, Lincoln's  endorsement  to  Holt,  April  27,  infra. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major-General  Meade:  Washington,  March  2,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  the  death  sentence  of  James  Whelan,  One 
hundred  and  sixteenth  Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  until  further  or- 
ders and  forward  record  for  examination.  A.  LINCOLN. 

[219] 


MARCH      2,      1864 

Major  Eckert: 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch.          JNO.  G.  NICOLAY, 

Private  Secretary. 

*  Tarbell  (Appendix) ,  p.  419.  On  March  3,  General  Meade  replied  to  Lin- 
coln's telegram: 

"You  telegraphed  me  yesterday  to  suspend  the  death  sentence  of  private 
James  Wheelan  n6th  Penna  Vols.  &  to  forward  the  records  for  examination. 

"I  have  ascertained  that  Wheelan  has  been  tried  by  court  martial  &  ac- 
quitted." (DLC-RTL). 

To  the  New  England  Kitchen1 

Executive  Mansion,  March  2,  1864. 
To  the  New-England  Kitchen,  connected  with  the 
Brooklyn  Sanitary  Fair: 

It  is  represented  to  me  that  my  autograph,  appended  to  this  note, 
may  somewhat  augment,  through  the  means  you  are  so  patrioti- 
cally employing,  the  contributions  for  the  benefit  of  our  gallant 
and  suffering  soldiers,  and  for  such  an  object  I  am  glad  to  give  it. 
Yours,  truly,  A.  LUSTCOLTST. 

1  The  Drum  Beat  (Brooklyn  Sanitary  Fair),  March  5,  1864.  According  to 
the  source,  Lincoln's  original  autograph  letter  was  sold  at  the  Fair  on  March  4, 
1864,  for  one  hundred  dollars,  to  C.  H.  Mallory,  Mystic  Bridge,  Connecticut. 

To  Davis  Tillson1 

Officer  in  Command  Executive  Mansion, 

at  Knoxville,  Tenn.  Washington,  March  2.  1864. 

Allow  Mrs.  Anne  Maria  Rumsey,  with  her  six  daughters,  to 
go  to  her  father,  Judge  Breck,  at  Richmond,  Kentucky. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  RPB.  Brigadier  General  Davis  Tillson  was  the  ranking  officer  at 
Knoxville  and  was  assigned  to  command  the  defenses  of  Knoxville  in  April. 
See  Lincoln  to  Breck,  supra. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  3.   1864. 

Please  send  me  a  nomination  for  James  S.  Emory  of  Kansas  to 
be  District  Attorney  for  Kansas.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,   Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.    James    S.    Emory's   appointment   was   confirmed   by    the    Senate    on 
March  18.  As  listed  in  the  U.S.  Official  Register,  1865,  his  name  is  given  as 
James  S.  Amory." 

[220] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

c  the  Secretary  of  War  concurs,  let  Coin  E  W  Serrell  visit 
shington  to  examine  Pontoons.  A  LIISTCOLIST. 

larch  sd.  1864. 

Hopy,  DLC-RTL.  The  copy  is  preserved  in  a  letter  from  Joseph  Francis, 
ch  4,  1864,  relating  that  on  the  other  side  of  the  card  bearing  Lincoln's 
,  Stanton  wrote  as  follows:  "The  Secretary  does  not  deem  it  expedient  to 
nit  Coin  Serrell  to  visit  Washington  for  the  purpose  within  mentioned,  hut 
he  contrary  thinks  it  highly  injurious  to  the  service  to  grant  such  applica- 
3."  Colonel  Edward  W.  Serrell  was  in  command  of  the  First  New  York 
ineers.  Joseph  Francis  has  not  been  identified. 


To  Frederick  Steele1 

.jor  General  Steele  Washington,  D.C., 

tie-Rock,  Ark.  March  3.  1864 

fours  including  Address  to  People  of  Arkansas,  is  received.  I 
Drove  the  address  and  thank  you  for  it.  Yours  in  relation  to 
Hard  M.  Randolph  also  received.2  Let  him  take  the  oath  of  Dec. 
.nd  go  to  work  for  the  new  constitution,  and  on  your  notifying 
of  it,  I  will  immediately  issue  the  special  pardon  for  him. 

A.  LINCOLN 

ALS,  RPB.  The  text  of  Steele's  address  contained  in  his  telegram  of 
rch  2  is  as  follows: 

the  People  of  Arkansas: 

It  affords  the  Genl  commanding  the  highest  gratification  to  be  able  to  say 
t,  by  the  conduct  of  the  army  under  his  command,  in  connection  -with  the 
ministration  of  the  Government  by  its  officers  at  Washington,  peace  has,  so 

been  restored  in  your  midst  as  to  enable  you  to  institute  proceedings  for 

restoration  of  the  civil  government,  by  which  order  may  be  firmly  estab- 
ied  and  the  rights  of  persons  and  property  secured  against  violence  and  the 
igers  of  anarchy. 

'The  convention  of  your  citizens  held  at  Little  Rock  during  the  last  month, 
;  adopted  a  constitution  and  submitted  it  to  you  for  your  approval  or  rejec- 
i.  That  constitution  is  based  upon  the  principles  of  freedom  and  it  is  for 
i  now  to  say  by  your  voluntary  and  unbiased  action  whether  it  shall  be 
xr  fundamental  law,  while  it  may  have  deficits  in  the  main  in  accordance 
th  the  views  of  that  portion  of  the  people  who  have  been  resisting  the 
tricidal  war  which  has  been  made  during  the  last  three  years  to  overthrow 
s  government  of  our  country. 

'The  convention  has  fixed  the  ±4th  day  of  March  next  on  which  to  decide 
s  great  question  and  the  General  commanding  is  only  following  the  in- 
uctions  of  his  government  when  he  says  to  you  that  every  facility  will  be 
ixed  for  the  expression  of  your  sentiments  uninfluenced  by  any  considera- 
ns  save  those  which  effect  your  own  interests  and  those  of  your  posterity, 
you  will  now  institute  a  government  of  your  own,  he  feels  great  confidence 
assuring  you  that  quiet  and  security  will  soon  be  restored  to  your  Eastern 
rders.  Those  who  have  been  unwisely  led  by  the  counsel  of  bad  men  to  en- 
ge  in  the  unjustifiable  and  wicked  rebellion  will  speedily  return  and  ac- 

[221] 


MARCH      4,      1864 

knowledge  the  rightful  sovereignty  of  the  state  as  well  as  the  supremacy  of  the 
national  Govt.  over  the  whole  dominion  and  peace  will  prevail.  .  .  .  The 
election  will  be  held  and  the  returns  made  in  accordance  with  the  Schedule 
adopted  by  the  convention  interference  from  any  quarter  will  be  allowed  to 
prevent  free  expression  of  the  loyal  men  of  the  state  on  that  day.  The  schedule 
will  be  hereto  appended.  To  render  the  election  valid  there  must  be  cast  five 
thousand  four  hundred  &  six  (5406)  votes."  (DLC-RTL). 

2  Steele's  telegram,  received  at  9:20  P.M.  on  March  2,  recommended  that 
"Willard  M  Randolph  late  Attorney  Genl  of  the  Confederate  states  for  the 
Eastern  district  of  Ark  be  pardoned,  he  only  accepted  office  to  keep  out  the 
rebel  army.  He  is  a  man  of  talent — will  be  true  to  the  U.S.  He  will  assist  in 
the  election."  (76zW.).  See  Lincoln's  endorsement  to  Bates  concerning  Randolph, 
March  7,  infra. 

To  Joseph  K.  Barnes1 

If  the  Surgeon  General  has  the  means  will  he  please  give  the  in- 
formation sought  in  this  letter.  A.  LmcoLiNr 
March  4,  1864 

1  American  Art  Association  Catalog,  December  3,  1923,  No.  553.  According 
to  the  catalog  description  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from 
Mrs.  W.  R.  Twitchell,  contents  not  specified. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  March  4,  1864. 

Admiral  Dahlgren  is  here,  and  of  course  is  very  anxious  about 
his  son.  Please  send  me  at  once  all  you  know,  or  can  learn  of  his 
fate.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  BPB.  General  Butler  forwarded  news  received  from  General  Judson 
Kilpatrick  that  "Colonel  Dahlgren  was  directed  to  make  a  diversion  with  500 
men  on  the  James  River.  He  attacked  at  4  p.m.  Tuesday  evening;  drove  the 
enemy  in  on  Richmond.  The  main  attack  having  failed,  Colonel  Dahlgren  at- 
tempted to  rejoin  me.  ...  He  and  Colonel  [Major  Edwin  F.]  Cooke  were 
with  the  advance  guard  .  .  .  ;  became  separated  from  his  main  force,  since 
which  nothing  has  been  heard.  .  .  ."  (OR,  I,  XXXIII,  197-98).  Concerning 
Colonel  Ulric  Dahlgren's  death,  see  Lincoln  to  Butler,  March  7,  infra. 

To  Salmon  E  Chase1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  the  Treasury.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  4,  1864. 

In  consequence  of  a  call  Mr.  Villard  makes  on,  me,  having  a 
note  from  you  to  him,  I  am  induced  to  say  I  have  no  wish  for 
the  publication  of  the  correspondence  between  yourself  and  me 
in  relation  to  the  Pomeroy  Circular — in  fact,  rather  prefer  to  avoid 

[222] 


MARCH     4,      1864 

an  unnecessary  exhibition — yet  you  are  at  liberty,  without  in  the 
least  offending  me,  to  allow  the  publication,  if  you  choose.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS  copy  (ADfS?),  DLC-RTL.  Henry  Villard's  despatch  of  March  6,  is 
in  part  as  follows:  "In  consequence  of  the  stir  made  by  the  secret  circular  of 
Senator  Pomeroy  the  Secretary  addressed  a  letter  to  the  President,  inquiring 
whether  there  was  anything  in  his  action  or  position  that  would  prejudice  the 
public  interests  under  his  charge,  and  added  that  he  did  not  wish  to  admin- 
ister the  affairs  of  the  Treasury  Department  without  the  President's  entire 
confidence.  The  President  replied  in  a  spirit  equally  frank  and  friendly,  stating 
in  substance  that  he  did  not  perceive  any  occasion  for  any  change  in  their 
official  relations.  This  is  the  substance  of  the  correspondence.  .  .  ."  (New  York 
Herald,  March  7,  1864). 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  report  on  this  case  if  the  record 
is  accessable.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  4.  1864 

Sentence  approved  A.  LINCOLN 

April  21.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1212.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsements are  written  on  papers  in  the  case  of  Joseph  R.  Hamrm'll,  engineer 
and  detective,  sentenced  to  two  years*  imprisonment  and  to  refund  public 
money  embezzled.  Holt  reported  that  the  sentence  was  in  accord  with  Mary- 
land laws. 


Memorandum  about  Churches1 

March  4,  1864 

I  have  written  before,  and  now  repeat,  the  United  States  Gov- 
ernment must  not  undertake  to  run  the  churches.  When  an  in- 
dividual in  a  church  or  out  of  it  becomes  dangerous  to  the  public 
interest  he  must  be  checked,  but  the  churches  as  such  must  take 
care  of  themselves.  It  will  not  do  for  the  United  States  to  appoint 
trustees,  supervisors,  or  other  agents  for  the  churches.  I  add  if  the 
military  have  military  need  of  the  church  building,  let  them  keep 
it;  otherwise  let  them  get  out  of  it,  and  leave  it  and  its  owners 
alone  except  for  causes  that  justify  the  arrest  of  any  one. 

A.  LiiNrcoLisr. 

1  NH,  X,  30.  See  also  Lincoln  to  Rosecrans,  April  4,  and  the  memorandum 
of  May  13,  infra,  and  the  endorsement  to  John  Hogan,  February  13,  supra. 
The  original  of  the  memorandum  of  March  4,  has  not  "been  located,  and  the 
occasion  which  necessitated  Lincoln's  repetition  of  aims  has  not  been  deter- 
mined. 

[223] 


To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington, 
Major  General  Rosecrans  March  4.  1864 

I  shall  be  obliged  if  you  will  examine  the  question,  and  give 
me  your  opinion  whether,  on  the  whole,  it  would  be  advantageous 
to  our  military  operations  for  the  United  States  to  furnish  iron 
for  completing  the  South  West  Branch  of  the  Pacific  Railroad,  all, 
or  any  part  of  the  way,  from  Rolla  to  Springfield  Missouri,  so  fast 
as  the  Company  shall  do  all  the  other  work  for  the  completion; 
and  to  receive  pay  for  said  iron,  in  transportation  upon  said  newly 
made  part  of  said  road.  It  is  understood  that  the  Company  will,  on 
these  terms,  speedily  put  the  road  into  working  order.  Yours  truly 

A. 


i  ALS  and  LS,  DLC-RTL.  This  letter  was  never  sent,  but  the  letter  to  Rose- 
crans, March  10,  infra9  was  drafted  instead.  See  Lincoln's  order  of  July  11, 
1862,  and  communications  to  Curtis,  October  12,  1862,  and  to  Glover,  January 
20,  1863,  supra.  On  January  20,  1864,  Nicolay  returned  the  order  of  July  11, 
1862,  after  making  a  copy  of  it  for  the  president  (ALS,  DNA  RG  60,  Papers  of 
Attorney  General,  Box  116).  Sometime  circa  March  4-10,  1864,  a  letter  was 
drafted,  possibly  by  Bates,  although  the  undated  copy  in  the  Lincoln  Papers  is 
not  in  Bates'  autograph: 

"Applications  have  been  frequently  made  to  me  to  order  the  completion  of 
the  South  West  Branch  of  the  Pacific  Railroad.  The  measure  has  been  recom- 
mended by  four  or  five  of  the  Major  Generals  commanding  at  different  times 
in  that  section.  I  made  an  order  for  its  completion  to  Lebanon  in  June  1862, 
which  order  still  remains  unexecuted. 

"Mr.  Gibson  [Charles  Gibson,  solicitor  of  U.S.  Court  of  Claims]  on  behalf  of 
the  Railroad  Company  now  proposes  that  if  the  General  Government  will  fur- 
nish the  iron,  the  company  will  grade,  &  otherwise  complete  the  road  &  furnish 
it  with  rolling  stock. 

"While  I  desire  to  see  Missouri  prosper  I  can  only  view  this  subject  from  a 
strictly  national  stand  point. 

"You  will  examine  into  the  matter  &  if  you  should  be  of  the  opinion  that 
the  interests  of  the  United  States  would  be  promoted  by  furnishing  this  iron, 
you  may  enter  into  an  agreement  with  the  company  to  do  so,  &  may  in  that 
event  order  the  Quartermaster  at  St.  Louis  to  purchase  it,  being  very  par- 
ticular in  such  agreement  to  guard  well  the  interests  of  the  National  Govern- 
ment. 

"From  the  lights  before  me  I  am  inclined  to  the  opinion  it  would  be  well  to 
secure  the  early  completion  of  the  road  as  far  as  Springfield"  (DLC-RTL, 
2901-2,  misdated  "[1863]"). 

Bates  Diary  under  date  of  March  9  and  10,  1864,  records  the  following: 

"The  Govr.  and  Gibson  are  not  content  with  the  Presidents  letter  to  Genl. 
Rosecrans,  about  completing  the  S.W.  Branch  of  our  Pacific  R.R.  and  want 
me  to  try  to  get  him  to  make  it  stronger.  It  only  directs  the  Genl.  to  enquire 
into  the  subject  and  report.  We  want  it  to  authorise  the  Genl.  if  he  finds  that 
the  road  would  be  advantageous  to  the  military  service,  to  act  definitively,  and 
furnish  the  iron,  as  fast  as  the  company  can  lay  it  down. 

"I  hope  to  convince  the  President  that  the  latter  is  the  better  course  —  better 
for^  the  service,  better  for  the  State  and  better  for  himself.  .  .  . 

"Mar.  10  The  Prest  has  changed  his  letter  to  Genl  Rosecrans  so  as  to  allow 
him  to  proceed  at  once.  .  .  ." 

[224] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

I  send  this  over  as  a  reminder  in  relation  to  allowing  the  "Thomas 
Colyer"  to  run  between  here  &  Mount- Vernon.         A.  LINCOLN 
March  4,  1864 

i  AES,  NHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Harriet  V. 
Fitch,  Vice  Regent  of  the  Mount  Vernon  Association,  February  26,  1864,  re- 
questing that  the  steamboat  Thomas  Collyer  be  permitted  to  run  between 
Washington  and  Mount  Vernon:  "We  have  through  much  labor  bought,  and 
paid  for,  the,  home  and  grave  of  Washington,  and  but  for  the  national  troubles, 
would  long  since  have  collected  a  sum,  equal  to  its  restoration,  and  future 
keeping.  Now,  we  have  no  means  to  keep  it — no  revenue  but  such  as  this  boat 
will  bring  us.  With  that  we  will  be  enabled  to  go  on  another  year,  at  least, 
and  at  the  end  of  that  time,  let  us  hope  for  brighter  days,  when  we  can  add 
to  our  fund;  by  further  collections  in  the  States." 

Stanton's  endorsement  follows  Lincoln's:  "The  Secretary  of  War  does  not 
deem  it  expedient  to  allow  a  Steamboat  to  run  to  Mt  Vernon  at  present." 

To  John  E  Usher1 

Send  nomination.         A.   LINCOLN 
March.  4.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  NR  RG  48,  Indian  Agencies,  Box  1274.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  an  undated  letter  from  James  R.  Doolittle  and  others,  recom- 
mending appointment  of  John  G.  McMynn  of  Wisconsin  as  superintendent  of 
Indian  affairs  for  Washington  Territory.  McMynn's  appointment  was  confirmed 
by  the  Senate  on  March  30,  1864. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  5.  1864. 

Send  me  a  nomination  for  Robert  Sherman,  as  Marshal  for  the 
District  of  Rhode-Island.  [A.  LINCOLN] 

1ALS,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  The  signature  has  been  clipped  from  the  letter.  Sherman's  appoint- 
ment was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  March  7,  1864. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Gov.    Johnson.     Attorney- General  please   make   out   pardons   in 
these  cases  in  the  forms  Gov.  Johnson   [will]  request. 

March  7,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Anderson  Auction  Company  Catalog  941,  February  27,  1912,  No.  608.  Ac- 
cording to  the  catalog  description,  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter 
relative  to  pardon  of  David  T.  Patterson,  J.  C.  Grant,  and  S.  J.  W.  Luckey,  of 
Tennessee. 

[225] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

March  7,  1864 

The  name  is  Willard  M.  Randolph.  He  was  an  attorney  for  the 
Rebel  Government,  but  now  taking  the  oath  and  going  to  work  to 
carry  the  free  State  Constitution  at  the  election  on  the  14th.  I  wish 
a  special  pardon  for  him.  Please  send  me  the  document. 

March  7,  1864  A-  LINCOLN 

l  Anderson  Galleries  Catalog  1658,  May  2,  1922,  No.  802.  According  to 
the  catalog  description  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  -written  on  the  back  of  a  mili- 
tary telegram.  See  Lincoln  to  Steele,  March  3,  supra. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe  Washington,  March  7.  1864. 

Gen.  Meade  has  Richmond  Sentinel,  saying  that  Col.  Dahlgren 
was  killed,  and  ninety  of  his  men  captured  at  King  &  Queen  C.- 
H.  When  did  Kilpatrick's  informant  last  see  Col.  Dahlgren? 

A.  LIINTCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Butler,  March  4,  supra,  and  March  1 7,  infra. 


To  John  A.  J.  CreswelF 

Hon.  John  A.  J.  Creswell  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  7,  1864. 

I  am  very  anxious  for  emancipation  to  be  effected  in  Maryland 
in  some  substantial  form.  I  think  it  probable  that  my  expressions 
of  a  preference  for  gradual  over  immediate  emancipation,  are  mis- 
understood. I  had  thought  the  gradual  would  produce  less  confu- 
sion, and  destitution,  and  therefore  would  be  more  satisfactory; 
but  if  those  who  are  better  acquainted  with  the  subject,  and  are 
more  deeply  interested  in  it,  prefer  the  immediate,  most  certainly 
I  have  no  objection  to  their  judgment  prevailing.  My  wish  is  that 
all  who  are  for  emancipation  in  any  form.,  shall  co-operate,  all 
treating  all  respectfully,  and  all  adopting  and  acting  upon  the 
major  opinion,  when  fairly  ascertained.  What  I  have  dreaded  is 
the  danger  that  by  jealousies,  rivalries,  and  consequent  ill-blood — 
driving  one  another  out  of  meetings  and  conventions — perchance 
from  the  polls — the  friends  of  emancipation  themselves  may  di- 
vide, and  lose  the  measure  altogether.  I  wish  this  letter  to  not  be 

[226] 


MARCH      7,      1864 

made  public;  but  no  man  representing  me  as  I  herein  represent 
myself ,  will  be  in  any  danger  of  contradiction  by  me.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  ALS  and  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  The  envelope  in  which  the  letter  was  sent  bears 
Lincoln's  endorsement  "Returned."  The  Maryland  legislature  had  enacted  a  bill 
calling  an  election  on  April  6  for  delegates  to  a  constitutional  convention  to 
be  held  on  April  27,  1864.  See  Lincoln  to  Hoffman,  October  10,  1864. 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  examine  &  report  on  this  case  at 
once.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  7,  1864 

Sentence  approved,  and  execution  fixed  for  Friday,  April  22nd 
1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  14,  1864 

Sentence  commuted  to  imprisonment  in  the  Penitentiary  at  hard 
labor  for  ten  years.  A.  LINCOLN 

Jan.  25,  1865 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  LL  1431.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsements are  written  on  the  papers  in  the  case  of  Lorenzo  C.  Stewart  (alias 
Shear),  Fourteenth  New  York  Artillery,  sentenced  to  be  hanged  for  desertion 
and  murder  (poisoning  soldiers).  A  petition  from  citizens  of  Elmira,  New 
York,  asking  clemency,  bears  the  endorsement  of  April  14,  1864,  and  a  report 
by  Dr.  John  P.  Gray,  January  25,  1865,  on  the  mental  condition  of  Stewart, 
bears  the  commutation  of  sentence  of  that  date.  See  Lincoln  to  Gray,  April  25, 
1864,  infra. 


To  William  A.  Merriwether1 

U.S.  Marshal  Executive  Mansion, 

at  Louisville  Ky  Washington,  March  7,  1864. 

Until  further  orders,  suspend  sale  of  property  and  further  pro- 
ceedings in  cases  of  the  United  States  against  Dr  John  B  English 
and  S.  S.  English,  et  al.  sureties  for  John  L  Hill 

Also  same  against  same  sureties  for  Thomas  A.  Ireland 

A.  LINCOLN. 
Major  Eckert 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch         JNO.  G.  NICOLAY 

Priv:  Sec 

1  Copy,  DLC-Nicolay  Papers.  On  February  26,  1864,  Jeremiah  T.  Boyle 
wrote  Lincoln  from  Louisville: 

"This  will  be  handed  to  you  by  Col.  S.  S.  English,  of  this  city,  a  loyal  citizen 

[227] 


MARCH      7,      1864 

and  true  union  man,  who  desires  to  see  you  relative  to  business  which  he  will 
explain. 

"I  can  say  that  it  is  within  my  knowledge  that  Dr.  English,  brother  of  the 
colonel,  entered  as  security  and  procured  the  colonel  to  unite  with  him  as  se- 
curity for  Hill  and  Ireland  (who  afterward  violated  their  oath  and  bond)  with 
the  view  ...  of  inducing  the  said  Hill  and  Ireland  to  resign  and  vacate  the 
offices  of  County  Judge  and  County  Clerk  of  Owen  County,  Ky,  in  order  that 
loyal  men  should  fill  the  offices,  and  thus  that  the  power  and  influence  of  the 
government  might  be  increased  in  the  county.  I  believe  the  main  purpose  was 
to  increase  the  loyal  union  influence,  and  such  I  believe  was  the  result  of  the 
action  of  Dr.  English  and  the  colonel.  I  trust  you  may  feel  that  it  would  be 
right  to  relieve  them  from  the  penalty  of  the  bond. 

"Colonel  English  is  a  true  and  reliable  gentleman  and  will  make  a  state- 
ment to  you  on  which  you  can  fully  rely.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


Order  Designating  Starting  Point  of 
Union  Pacific  Railroad1 

March  7,  1864 

In  pursuance  of  the  provisions  of  Section  14,  of  the  Act  of  Con- 
gress entitled  "An  Act  to  aid  in  the  construction  of  a  Rail  Road  and 
Telegraph  Line  from  the  Missouri  River  to  the  Pacific  Ocean,  and 
to  secure  to  the  Government  the  use  of  the  same  for  Postal, — 
Military,  and  other  purposes,"  Approved  July  ist.  1862,  author- 
izing and  directing  the  President  of  the  United  States,  to  fix  the 
point  on  the  Western  boundary  of  the  State  of  Iowa,  from  -which 
the  Union  Pacific  Rail  Road  Company  is  by  said  section  author- 
ized and  required  to  construct  a  single  line  of  Rail  Road,  and  Tele- 
graph, upon  the  most  direct  and  practicable  route,  subject  to  the 
approval  of  the  President  of  the  United  States,  so  as  to  form  a 
connection  with  the  lines  of  said  Company,  at  some  point  on  the 
one  hundre[d]th  meridian  of  longitude  in  said  section  named:  I, 
Abraham  Lincoln  President  of  the  United  States  do,  upon  the  ap- 
plication of  the  said  Company,  designate  and  establish  such  first 
above  named  point,  on  the  Western  boundary  of  the  State  of  Iowa, 
east  of,  and  opposite  to  the  East  line  of  Section  10,  in  Township  15, 
North,  of  Range  13,  East  of  the  sixth  principle  meridian,  in  the 
Territory  of  Nebraska 

Done  at  the  City  of  Washington  this,  seventh,  day  of  March,  in 
the  year  of  our  Lord,  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  sixty  four 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

1  Copy,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  F6.  The  original  order  has  not  been  lo- 
cated. The  copy  in  the  Senate  files  was  enclosed  with  Lincoln's  communication 
to  the  Senate  of  March  9,  infra.  See  also  Lincoln's  order  of  November  17  1863 
supra. 

[228] 


Order  in  Regard  to  Export  of  Tobacco1 

Executive  Mansion 
Washington,  7th  March,  1864. 

Whereas  by  an  Executive  Order  on  the  loth  of  November  last, 
permission  was  given  to  export  certain  tobacco  belonging  to  the 
French  Government  from  insurgent  territory,  which  tobacco  was 
supposed  to  have  been  purchased  and  paid  for  prior  to  the  4th 
March  1861;  but  whereas,  it  was  subsequently,  ascertained  that  a 
part  at  least,  of  the  said  tobacco  had  been  purchased  subsequently 
to  that  date,  which  fact  made  it  necessary  to  suspend  the  carrying 
into  effect  of  the  said  order;  but  whereas,  pursuant  to  mutual 
explanations  a  satisfactory  understanding  on  the  subject  has  now 
been  reached,  it  is  directed  that  the  Order  aforesaid  may  be  car- 
ried into  effect;  it  being  understood  that  the  quantity  of  French 
tobacco  so  to  be  exported,  shall  not  exceed  Seven  thousand  hogs- 
heads, and  that  it  is  the  same  tobacco  respecting  the  exportation  of 
which  application  was  originally  made  by  the  French  Government. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN". 

1  Copy,  DLC-Butler  Papers. 

To  George  D.  Ramsay1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Gen.  Ramsay.  Washington,  March  7,  1864. 

Will  a  number  of  the  Absterdam  Shells,  or  projectiles,  be  placed 
in  the  hands  of  the  troops  for  trial,  as  recommended  by  Capt. 
Benton,  in  his  report  of  March  3rd?  Yours  truly  A  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  ORB.  See  Lincoln  to  Benton,  March  i,  supra.  On  the  bottom  of  Lin- 
coln's note  is  the  following  endorsement  by  General  Ramsay:  *'I  should  like 
to  preserve  this  note  and  therefore  beg  it  may  be  returned  to  me."  See  further, 
Lincoln's  endorsement  to  Ramsay,  March  10,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  March  7,  1864. 

I  think  it  is  but  fair  that  Quarter-Master-General  Allen,  should 
be  allowed  to  fix  the  rate  of  rent  of  Col.  Mondays  property  now 
used  by  the  Government  at  Mound-City;  and  I  shall  be  glad  if 
the  Sec.  of  War  will  direct  him  to  do  so.  A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  THaroL.  Colonel  Marcellus  Mundy,  Twenty-third  Kentucky  In- 
fantry, whose  signature  is  incorrectly  indexed  as  "M.  Murray"  in  the  Lincoln 

[229] 


MARCH      7,      1864 

Papers,  wrote  Lincoln  from  Willard's  Hotel  on  March  8,  1864:  "I  had  the 
honor  'this  morning  to  present  your  respectful  request  to  the  Secretary  of 
War,  that  he  would  refer  the  matter  at  issue  between  the  government  and  me 
regarding  the  rental  of  my  property  at  Mound  City,  Illinois,  used  by  the  gov- 
ernment for  hospital,  to  Brig.  Gen.  [Robert]  Allen  A.Q.M.  at  Louisville  Ken- 
tucky for  settlement,  —  and  I  regret  to  inform  you  that  the  Hon.  Secretary 
declines  to  comply  with  your  request.  Without  detailing  the  interview  I  will 
say  to  you  that  I  feel  compelled  to  abandon  my  property  as  I  am  satisfied  that 
whatever  fair  claims  I  may  have  as  citizen  or  soldier  will  be  disregarded  by 
the  present  administration  and  the  urging  of  them  further  would  but  subject 
me  to  further  discourtesy.  I  thank  you  for  the  courtesy  extended  to  me  in  our 
last  interview.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War:  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  7,  1864. 

It  is  represented  to  me  that  General  David  B.  Birney,  who  is 
nominated  for  a  Major  General  to  take  rank  from  June  22nd. 
1863,  is  really  entitled,  if  at  all,  to  take  rank  from  May  3.  1863, 
for  meritorious  conduct  at  Chancellor  sville.  It  is  also  represented 
that  to  make  the  desired  change  will  not  give  Gen.  Birney  rank 
over  any  one  who  now'  ranks  him.  I  shall  be  glad  to  withdraw  his 
present  nomination  and  make  the  change,  if  the  above  is  a  true 
and  a  full  statement  of  the  facts.  Yours  truly  A. 


1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  Brigadier  General  David  B.  Birney's  nomination  as  major 
general  was  revised  to  date  from  May  20,  1863,  rather  than  from  May  3. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War:  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  March  7,  1864. 

The  bearer  is  Gov.  Hall  of  Missouri,  whom  I  have  much  pleas- 
ure in  introducing  to  you.  I  shall  be  glad  for  yourself  and  Col.  Fry 
to  give  him  a  full  hearing  on  Missouri  matters.  Yours  truly 

A.  LusrcoLisr 

1  ALS,  IHi.  Lieutenant  Governor  Willard  P.  Hall  succeeded  to  the  governor- 
ship following  the  death  of  Governor  Hamilton  R.  Gamble  on  January  31,  1864. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

March  7,  1864 

Sec.  of  War,  please  have  a  full  report  of  this  case  sent  me.  Hon. 
Mr.  Bailey  says  this  man  went  home  last  fall  on  the  loyal  side, 
and  actually  fought  for  the  previlege.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  7.  1864. 

[230] 


MARCH      8,      1864 

1  AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  back  of  a  printed 
copy  of  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  toy.  See  Lincoln's  memorandum  concerning 
Charles  Garretson,  March  i,  supra.  Representative  Joseph  Bailey  may  have 
obtained  modification  of  Garretson's  dismissal,  for  later  references  give  Gar- 
retson as  "mustered  out"  rather  than  "dismissed"  on  March  5,  1864. 

To  Queen  Victoria1 

March  7,  1864 
Abraham  Lincoln 

President  of  the  United  States  of  America. 
To  Her  Majesty  Victoria 

Queen  of  the  United  Kingdom 
of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland 
&c.  &c.  &c. 

Sendeth  Greeting: 

Great  and  Good  Friend:  I  have  received  the  letter  which  Your 
Majesty  addressed  to  me  on  the  3oth.  day  of  January  last,  inform- 
ing me  that  Her  Royal  Highness,  the  Princess  of  Wales,  Daughter 
of  His  Majesty,  the  King  of  Denmark,  Consort  of  Your  Majesty's 
well-beloved  son,  His  Royal  Highness  Albert  Edward,  Prince  of 
Wales,  Duke  of  Saxony,  Prince  of  Saxe  Coburg  and  Gotha  &c.  &c. 
was  safely  delivered  of  a  Prince  on  the  8th.  of  that  month. 

I  pray  Your  Majesty  to  accept  my  cordial  congratulations  upon 
this  event,  and  to  be  assured  that  I  take  a  lively  interest  in  all 
that  concerns  the  happiness  and  prosperity  of  Your  Royal  House, 
and  so  I  recommend  Your  Majesty  and  Your  Royal  Family  to  the 
protection  of  the  Almighty.  Your  Good  Friend 

Washington  /th.  March,  1864.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

By  the  President 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD  Secretary  of  State. 

1  Copy,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Communications  to  Foreign  Sovereigns  and  States, 
III,  217-18. 

Memorandum : 
Appointment  of  William  F.  Allen1 

[March  8,  1864] 
West-Point. 

William  F.  Allen — Son  of  Col.  who  lost  his  life  off,  Hatteras — 

New-Jersey. 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1862,  No.  i.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  an  envelope  containing  recommendations  and  pho- 

[231] 


MARCH      9,      1864 

tograph  of  William  F.  Allen,  son  of  Colonel  Joseph  W.  Allen,  Ninth  New 
Jersey  Volunteers,  drowned  January  15,  1862,  on  Burnside's  expedition.  A  simi- 
lar endorsement  by  Lincoln  is  on  the  photograph:  "West-Point — Wm.  F  Allen 
son  of  Col.  Allen — drowned  at  Hatteras  Inlet — "  There  is  no  record  of  Al- 
len's appointment. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington,  March  9.  1864. 

What    are    the    facts  about    the    imprisonment    of    Joseph    A. 
Bilisoly?  A. 


i-ALS,  RPB.  General  Butler  replied  on  the  same  day  that  the  causes  of  im- 
prisonment of  Bilisoly  were  "first  he  is  a  Secessionist,  has  had  eleven  children 
and  grandchildren  in  the  confederate  army,  said  he  was  sorry  he  hadn't  more 
&  has  taken  the  oath  of  allegiance  but  says  his  sympathies  are  with  the  South 
and  not  with  the  north.  Third  —  Over  two  hundred  thousand  (200  ooo)  dollars 
of  the  assets  of  the  Saving  Bank  of  Portsmouth  have  been  traced  into  his  hands 
&  he  refuses  to  give  any  account  of  it  &  lies  when  he  is  examined  about  it. 
Fourth.  He  had  a  secret  box  made  under  his  daughter's  bedroom  floor  in  which 
he  concealed  arms  &  the  plate  of  another  secessionist  &  when  called  to  account 
for  it  lied  about  it.  Fifth.  He  is  only  committed  until  he  will  tell  the  truth  as  to 
the  secretion  of  the  Bank  property.  When  he  does  this  he  will  be  brought  up 
for  examination.  It  is  the  common  case  of  confinement  of  a  witness  for  con- 
tempt." (DLC-RTL). 

In  the  Butler  Papers  (DLC)  is  a  letter  from  Bilisoly's  daughter,  Mrs.  George 
R.  Boush,  addressed  to  President  Lincoln,  March  i,  1864,  which  states  the 
circumstances  of  her  father's  imprisonment  somewhat  differently:  "He  is 
charged  with  knowing,  where  some  of  the  most  important  papers  of  the 
Portsmouth  Saving's  Bank,  are  concealed.  Notwithstanding,  he  positively  de- 
nied the  charge  [,]  was  taken  to  prison,  and  early  in  the  morning,  hurried  to 
Fortress  Monroe,  without  breakfast,  and  not  one  penny  in  his  pocket.  Report 
says  confined  in  a  cell,  with  nothing  to  lie  down  on.  My  husband  Geo.  Richard 
Boush  (Master  Builder  of  the  Gosport  Yard)  is  now  in  Alexandria,  attending 
the  Convention;  therefore  I  have  to  act  for  myself." 


Judge  Advocate  General  please  examine  and  report  on  this  case. 
March  9,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

jral  please  examine  an 

—  •— 1— •-"-"»*     575      -..w*^.  JL\..     JL_/iJ.>  V^V-»JLjl"N 

Pardon,  for  the  unexpired  part  of  the  imprisonment. 

March  29.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

i  AES,  DNA  WB.  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1253.  Lincoln's 
endorsements  are  written  on  the  papers  in  the  case  of  Captain  William  H. 
Wickes,  One  Hundred  Sixty-ninth  New  York  Volunteers,  dismissed  on  Febru- 
ary 12,  1864,  and  sentenced  to  six  months'  imprisonment  for  presenting  false 
vouchers.  Holt's  report  indicated  no  ground  justifying  interference  in  the 
case  by  the  president.  The  record  also  indicates  an  endorsement  of  Lincoln's 

[232] 


MARCH      Q,      1864 

dated  April  21,  1864,  denying  the  application  for  pardon,  which  has  not  "been 
found  and  may  have  been  removed  from  the  file  because  of  Wickes'  prior  re- 
lease from  prison  under  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  ±54,  April  i,  1864. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington,  March  9,  1864. 

New  York  City  votes  9,500  majority  for  allowing  soldiers  to 
vote,  and  the  rest  of  the  State  nearly  all  on  the  same  side.  Tell 
the  soldiers.  A.  LINCOLN. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  420.  Daniel  H.  Craig  of  the  Associated  Press  at 
New  York  City  telegraphed  Lincoln  on  March  8,  1864:  "New  York  City  gives 
ninety  five  hundred  (9500)  majority  for  allowing  soldiers  to  vote.  Returns 
from  interior  show  majorities  same  every  where."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  the  Senate1 

Executive  Mansion 
To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  March  gth.  1864. 

In  compliance  with  a  resolution  of  the  Senate,  of  the  1st.  in- 
stant, respecting  the  points  of  commencement  of  the  Union  Pacific 
Railroad,  on  the  tooth,  degree  of  West  Longitude,  and  of  the 
branch  road,  from  the  Western  boundary  of  Iowa,  to  the  said 
looth.  degree  of  Longitude,  I  transmit  the  accompanying  report 
from  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  containing  the  information 
called  for. 

I  deem  it  proper  to  add  that,  on  the  i/th  day  of  November  last, 
an  executive  order  was  made  upon  this  subject,  and  delivered  to 
the  Vice  President  of  the  Union  Pacific  Rail  Road  Company, 
which  fixed  the  point,  on  the  western  boundary  of  the  State  of 
Iowa  from  which  the  Company  should  construct  their  Branch- 
Road  to  the  looth.  degree  of  West  Longitude,  and  declared  it  to 
be  within  the  limits  of  the  township,  in  Iowa,  opposite  the  town 
of  Omaha  in  Nebraska.  Since  then  the  Company  has  represented 
to  me,  that,  upon  actual  surveys  made,  it  has  determined  upon  the 
precise  point  of  departure  of  their  said  Branch-R  road  from  the 
Missouri  river,  and  located  the  same  as  described  in  the  accom- 
panying report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  which  point  is 
within  the  limits  designated  in  the  order  of  November  last;  and 
inasmuch  as  that  order  is  not  of  record  in  any  of  the  Executive 
Departments,  and  the  Company  having  desired  a  more  definite 

[233] 


MARCH      g,      ±864 

one,  I  have  made  the  order,  of  which  a  copy  is  herewith,   and 
caused  the  same  to  be  filed  in  the  Department  of  the  Interior, 

ABRAHAM:  LINCOLN 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  a8A  F6.  See  Lincoln's  order  of  March  7,  supra. 
Secretary  Usher's  report  of  March  8,  which  Lincoln  transmitted,  indicated  that 
"the  point  of  commencement  of  said  road  on  the  one  hundredth  degree  of 
west  longitude  has  not  yet  been  fixed." 

Speech  to  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

General  Grant  [March  9,  1864] 

The  nation's  appreciation  of  what  you  have  done,  and  it's  reli- 
ance upon  you  for  what  remains  to  do,  in  the  existing  great 
struggle,  are  now  presented  with  this  commission,  constituting  you 
Lieutenant  General  in  the  Army  of  the  United  States.  With  this 
high  honor  devolves  upon  you  also,  a  corresponding  responsibility. 
As  the  country  herein  trusts  you,  so,  under  God,  it  will  sustain 
you.  I  scarcely  need  to  add  that  with  what  I  here  speak  for  the 
nation  goes  my  own  hearty  personal  concurrence. 

IAD,  owned  by  Ulysses  S.  Grant,  III,  Washington,  D.C.  On  the  night  of 
March  8,  1864,  General  Grant  reported  to  President  Lincoln  at  the  White 
House  in  obedience  to  orders  received  at  Nashville,  Tennessee,  several  days 
before.  The  president's  weekly  reception  was  in  progress,  but  following  an  ova- 
tion to  General  Grant,  Lincoln  arranged  to  meet  him  later  for  a  private  con- 
ference. Nicolay's  report  of  the  conference  is  as  follows: 

"The  President  here  made  an  appointment  with  him  for  the  formal  pre- 
sentation next  day  of  his  commission  as  lieutenant-general.  4I  shall  make  a 
very  short  speech  to  you,'  said  Lincoln,  *to  which  I  desire  you  to  reply,  for 
an  object;  and  that  you  may  be  properly  prepared  to  do  so  I  have  written 
what  I  shall  say,  only  four  sentences  in  all,  which  I  will  read  from  my  manu- 
script as  an  example  which  you  may  follow  and  also  read  your  reply — as  you 
are  perhaps  not  so  much  accustomed  to  public  speaking  as  I  am;  and  I  there- 
fore give  you  what  I  shall  say  so  that  you  may  consider  it.  There  are  two 
points  that  I  would  like  to  have  you  make  in  your  answer:  First,  to  say 
something  which  shall  prevent  or  obviate  any  jealousy  of  you  from  any  of 
the  other  generals  in  the  service;  and  second,  something  which  shall  put  you 
on  as  good  terms  as  possible  with  the  Army  of  the  Potomac.  If  you  see  any 
objection  to  doing  this,  be  under  no  restraint  whatever  in  expressing  that  ob- 
jection to  the  Secretary  of  War.'  "  (Nicolay  and  Hay,  Abraham  Lincoln:  A 
History,  VIII,  340-41). 

The  next  day  at  one  o'clock  the  presentation  took  place  "in  presence  of  the 
Cabinet,  General  Halleck,  two  members  of  Grant's  staff,  and  the  President's 
private  secretary.  .   .  ."    (Ibid.).  Following   Lincoln's   speech,   Grant   read   his 
pencilled  reply  as  follows: 
"Mr.  President: 

"I  accept  this  commission  with  gratitude  for  the  high  honor  confered. 

"With  the  aid  of  the  noble  armies  that  have  fought  on  so  many  fields  for 
our  common  country,  it  will  be  my  earnest  endeavor  not  to  disappoint  your 
expectations. 

"I  feel  the  full  weight  of  the  responsibilities  now  devolving  on  me  and 
know  that  if  they  are  met  it  will  be  due  to  those  armies,  and  above  all  to  the 

[234] 


MARCH      10,      ±864 

favor  of  tliat  Providence  which  leads  both  Nations  and  men."  (AD,  DLC-Grant 
Papers). 

Grant's  commission  as  lieutenant  general  dated  from  March  2,   1864. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

Lieut.  Gen.  Grant  Executive  Mansion 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington,  March  10.  1864 

Mrs.  L.  invites  yourself  and  Gen.  Meade  to  dine  with  us  Satur- 
day evening.  Please  notify  him,  and  answer  whether  you  can  be 
with  us  at  that  time.  A. 


1ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  i.  Grant's  reply  to 
Lincoln's  telegram  was  received  at  7:45  P.M.:  "Genl.  Meade  and  myself  accept 
your  kind  invitation  to  dine  with  Mrs.  Lincoln  on  Saturday."  (DLC-RTL).  A 
Washington  despatch  of  March  13  reported,  however,  that  "The  sudden  return 
of  Lieut.-Gen.  Grant  to  the  West  prevented  him  from  participating  in  the 
military  dinner  at  the  Executive  Mansion  last  night.  However,  nearly  all,  if 
not  the  entire  number  of  Major  and  Brigadier-Generals  now  here,  including 
Gens.  Halleck,  Meade,  Sickles,  and  McCook,  together  with  the  Secretary  of 
War,  dined  with  the  President.  .  .  ."  (New  York  Tribune,  March  14,  1864). 

List  of  Candidates  for  West  Point1 

[c.  March  10,  1864] 

John  D.  C.  Hoskins.  —  Has  served  in  this  -war  —  Gen.  Grant's  boy.2 
David  Dick  Johnson  —    Perm.8 
Beverly  Allen  —  Mo.  Pope's  boy.4 

William  Whipple  —        Army5 
Augustus  P.  Barnard.  —  Army6 
Nesmith.  —  7    Oregon. 
John  B.  Engle.  la.  now  in  Libby  —  Hon.  H.  S.  Lane.8 

IAD,  DLC-RTL.  This  list  is  written  on  a  military  telegraph  form  dated 
1864,  and  appears  to  be  contemporary  with  the  memorandum,  infra. 

2  See  memorandum  of  January  20,  supra. 

3  See  memorandum  of  January  6,  supra.  4  See  memorandum,  infra. 

S  Charles  William  Whipple,  son  of  William  D.  Whipple,  entered  West  Point, 
July  i,  1864.  6  No  record  of  an  appointment  has  been  found. 

7  "George  W.  Pyle"  is  written  in  pencil  above  "Nesmith,"  which  has  been 
deleted.  See  Lincoln's  memorandum  of  February  27,  supra. 

8  Corporal  John  B.  Engle,  Eighty-sixth  Indiana  Infantry,  was  mustered  out 
in  June,  1865,  and  appointed  second  lieutenant,  Seventeenth  Infantry,  on  Feb- 
ruary 23,  1866. 

Memorandum:  Appointment  of  Beverly  Allen1 

[c.  March  10]   1864 

Papers  used  when  making  West-Point  appointments  for   1863  — 
and  now  some  to  be  used  in  1  864 

[235] 


MARCH      1O,      1864 

1  AE,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  envelope  contain- 
ing a  letter  from  Mrs.  Lucretia  Pope  Yeatman,  March  10,  1864:  "I  take  liberty 
of  reminding  you  that  in  October  last  you  promised  to  appoint  early  in  March 
Beverly  Allen  of  St.  Louis  Missouri  to  a  cadetship  at  West  Point.  Lest  in  the 
multiplicity  of  cares  it  may  have  passed  out  of  your  mind  I  venture  to  call 
your  attention  to  it."  No  appointment  of  Beverly  Allen  is  of  record. 

Order  Assigning  Ulysses  S.  Grant  to  Command 
of  the  Armies  of  the  U.S.1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  B.C.,  March  [10],  1864. 

Under  the  authority  of  an  act  of  Congress  to  revive  the  grade  of 
lieutenant-general  in  the  United  States  Army,  approved  February 
29,  1864,  Lieutenant-General  Ulysses  S.  Grant,  U.S.  Army,  is 
assigned  to  the  command  of  the  armies  of  the  United  States. 

ABRAHAM 


1  OR,  I,  XXXII,  III,  83.  Lincoln's  order  has  not  been  found.  As  printed  in 
the  Official  Records,  it  is  dated  "March,  1864,  but  Stanton's  telegram  to  Grant 
of  March  10,  1864,  establishes  the  date:  "Pursuant  to  the  authority  of  the  act 
of  Congress  .  .  .  the  President,  by  Executive  Order  of  this  date,  has  as- 
signed to  you  the  command  of  the  Armies  of  the  United  States."  (OR,  I,  XXX- 
III,  663). 

To  George  D.  Ramsay1 

March  10,  1864 

I  think  the  Absterdam  projectile  is  too  good  a  thing  to  be  lost  to 
the  service,  and  if  offered  at  the  Hotchkiss  prices,  and  not  in  ex- 
cessive quantities,  nor  unreasonable  terms  in  other  respects,  by 
either  or  both  parties  to  the  patent  controversy,  take  it,  so  that  the 
test  be  fully  made.  I  am  for  the  government  having  the  best 
articles,  in  spite  of  patent  controversies.  A.  LINCOLN 

March.  10.  1864. 

1  AES,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Ramsay,  March  7,  supra.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  letter  from  Brigadier  General  Ramsay,  March  8, 
1864,  as  follows: 

"I  had  the  honor  to  receive  this  morning  your  interrogatory  as  to  placing  a 
number  of  the  Absterdam  projectiles  in  the  hands  of  troops  for  trial  as  recom- 
fcnended  by  Captain  Benton  in  his  Report  of  the  sd  instant?  In  reply,  I  beg 
to  state  that  Messrs  Dickson  &  Zane  propose  to  furnish  to  the  U  States,  for 
a  period  of  twelve  months,  and  to  be  delivered  in  the  City  of  Phila,  seven  hun- 
dred &  twenty  thousand  of  the  Absterdam  projectiles,  in  the  proportion  of  1/10 
solid  shot  &  9/10  shell  at  the  following  rates,  viz:  — 

10  pds        ea.  two  dollars  ($2.00) 

20    "  "  three  6o/  $3.60 

4-62  inch    "  four  io/  $4.10 

"These  prices  are  greatly  in  excess  of  what  is  now  paid  for  similar  projec- 
tiles as  will  be  seen  by  the  comparative  statement  herewith  submitted.  I  would 

[236] 


MARCH      1  O,      1864 

further  state  that  Mr.  Absterdam  claims  that  the  projectiles  tried  and  reported 
upon  by  Capt  Benton  were  made  under  a  patent  not  covered  by  the  assign- 
ment of  his  projectiles  to  other  parties.  It  would  thus  appear  that  the  question 
of  right  is  involved  in  controversy;  and  until  this  question  is  satisfactorily  ad- 
justed, I  should  feel  unwilling  to  negotiate  with  either  party.  All  things  har- 
moniously arranged  and  the  prices  agreed  upon,  I  shall  be  happy  to  order  a 
sufficient  number  of  these  projectiles  to  fully  test  their  merits  by  actual  trial 
in  the  field." 

To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Rosecrans  Washington,  March  10,  1864. 

Please  carefully  examine  and  consider  the  question  whether,  on 
the  whole,  it  would  be  advantageous  to  our  Military  operations  for 
the  United  States  to  furnish  iron  for  completing  the  South- West- 
Branch  of  the  Pacific  Railroad  all,  or  any  part  of  the  way  from 
Rolla  to  Springfield,  Missouri,  so  fast  as  the  Company  shall  do 
all  the  other  work  for  the  completion,  and  to  receive  pay  for  said 
iron  in  transportation  upon  said  newly  made  part  of  said  road — 
and  if  your  opinion  shall  be  in  the  affirmative,  make  a  contract 
with  the  company  to  that  effect,  subject  to  my  approval  or  rejec- 
tion. In  any  event  report  the  main  facts  together  with  your  rea- 
soning, to  me.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

*ALS  (ADfS?),  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Rosecrans,  March  4,  supra.  On 
September  15,  1864,  Rosecrans  submitted  his  report,  enclosing  the  agreement 
made  at  St.  Louis  on  July  26,  between  the  Pacific  Railroad  (by  its  president, 
George  R.  Taylor)  and  the  United  States  (by  Colonel  William  Myers,  assist- 
ant quartermaster,  acting  under  Rosecrans'  order),  which  followed  Lincoln's 
instructions  of  March  10.  Exhibit  P  of  the  Report  is  a  letter  from  Bates  to 
Rosecrans,  March  19,  1864: 

"I  venture  to  address  you  touching  a  matter  of  great  importance  which  has 
been  committed  to  your  discretionary  judgment,  by  a  special  order  of  the 
President.  ...  I  shall  not  trouble  you  .  .  .  with  any  detailed  .  .  .  facts,  nor 
any  prolonged  argument  .  .  .  because  my  friend,  Mr  Gibson  who  will  hand 
you  this,  is  fully  possessed  of  the  subject,  and  has  .  .  .  all  needful  documents 
...  I  desire  however  to  say  that,  long  ago  (perhaps  two  years — &  ever  since) 
I  urged  upon  the  government  here,  the  immediate  completion  of  that  road,  as 
a  military  necessity,  and  as  a  measure  of  great  and  obvious  economy,  in 
money,  time,  and  actual  force  necessary,  not  only  to  the  defence  of  that 
frontier,  but  also  to  the  reestablishment  of  the  national  authority,  still  farther 
south  and  west.  In  my  judgment,  the  same  necessity  and  the  same  motives  of 
economy  still  exist.  .  .  . 

"The  measure,  if  now  adopted  and  promptly  acted  upon,  will,  I  think,  yield 
immediate  fruits — i.  It  will  stranguilize  Missouri  into  order  &  peace:  2.  It  will 
deter  the  enemy  from  any  attempt,  even  by  guerrillas,  to  continue  the  war  in 
S.W.  Mo.  and  N.W.  Arkansas.-  3.  It  will  set  free  a  large  force,  now  required 
to  guard  that  region,  either  to  serve  in  other  fields,  where  the  enemy  is  still 
in  force,  or  to  return  to  agriculture.  .  .  . 

"I  know  that  the  President  heretofore  was  favorable  to  the  measure,  and  I 
am  fully  convinced  that  he  believes,  with  me,  now,  that  if  it  had  been  then 

[237] 


MARCH      1  O,        ±864 

carried  out,  millions  of  money  would  have  been  saved  to  the  treasury.  .  .  ." 
f  T~\T  f^  "RTT j} 

Rosecrans'  eight-page  letter  of  September  15  concluded:  "Under  all  the  cir- 
cumstances of  the  case  I  would  respectfully  recommend  prompt  action  and 
an  early  anouncement  of  the  approval  of  the  contract.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

I  would  like  for  Mr.  Dudley  and  Mr.  Scovel  to  be  obliged  in  this 
matter.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  10.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Appointments,  Box  293.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  letter  from  Thomas  H.  Dudley,  consul  at  Liverpool,  England, 
December  29,  1863,  recommending  George  W.  Gilbert  of  Camden,  New  Jersey. 
James  M.  Scovel  also  recommended  Gilbert's  appointment,  but  no  record  of  an 
appointment  has  been  found. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

March  10,  1864 

The  widow  of  Commander  Ward  of  the  Navy,  killed  at  Mathia's 
Point  early  in  the  war  appeals  to  me  to  discharge  her  son,  who  has 
enlisted  in  the  New  York  6th.  .  .  .  For  the  memory  of  his  father 
and  that  his  mother  is  an  indigent  widdow,  let  him  be  discharged. 

1  American  Art  Association  Anderson  Galleries  Catalog  4115,  May  17,  1934, 
No.  180.  According  to  the  catalog  description,  this  partial  text  is  taken  from 
an  autograph  letter  signed.  Commander  James  H.  Ward  was  killed  on  June 
27,  t86i,  in  action  at  Mathias  Point  on  the  Potomac.  His  son,  Frederick  B. 
Ward,  is  mentioned  in  his  obituary  as  being  present  at  his  father's  death,  but 
identification  of  the  son  enlisted  in  the  Sixth  New  York  Volunteers  has  not 
been  made. 

To  W.  F.  M.  Arny1 

March  12,  1864 

I  shall  not  be  hasty  about  the  matter  mentioned.  Mr.  Perea 
never  asked  for  your  removal,  at  least,  never  to  me,  till  very  re- 
cently; and  then  only  as  I  understood  him,  because  you  had  left 
your  post  and  come  here  to  meddle  with  him  and  his  business.  I 
only  wish  now  you  were  at  your  post  attending  to  it's  duties. 
March  12.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  owned  by  Herman  Blum,  Blumhaven  Library,  Philadelphia,  Pennsyl- 
vania. Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  W.  F.  M.  Arny,  Sec- 
retary of  New  Mexico,  February  11,  1864: 

"I  understand  that  Mr.  Perea  is  pressing  my  removal 

"Do  me  the  favor  to  postpone  any  action  in  the  matter  till  I  can — prepare 
my  reply  to  the  charges  which  I  will  do  next  week." 

Francisco  Perea  was  delegate  to  congress  from  New  Mexico. 

[238] 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Major  General  Butler  War  Department, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  B.C.,  March  12  1864. 

If  Miss  Gaston  and  Miss  Manly  still  refuse  to  take  the  oath  let 
them  return  South.  A  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  4.  General  Butler  tele- 
graphed on  March  11:  "Miss  Gaston  and  Miss  Manly  friends  of  Mr  Blair 
have  come  to  this  point  upon  your  order.  They  refuse  to  take  the  oath  of 
allegiance.  They  understand  they  are  coming  on  a  visit  only  to  their  friends 
in  Maryland,  and  are  soon  to  return  south.  What  shall  be  done,  wish  return 
or  send  them  to  Baltimore?"  (DLC-RTL).  Miss  Gaston  and  Miss  Manly  have 
not  been  further  identified. 


To  William  M.  Fishback1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

William  Fishback  War  Department, 

Fort-Smith,  Ark.  Washington,  B.C.,  March  12  1864. 

I  know  not  that  any  change  of  departmental  lines  is  likely  to 
be  made  in  Arkansas;  but  if  done,  it  will  be  for  purely  military 
reasons,  to  which  the  good  people  there  can  have  no  just  cause  of 
objection.  Get  out  the  largest  vote  yon  can,  and  the  largest  part 
of  them  on  the  right  side  which  is  possible  A.  LINCOLN 

iALS,  DNA  WR  KG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  3.  Lincoln  received 
telegrams  on  March  12  from  William  Fishback  and  Governor  Isaac  Murphy, 
protesting 'news  from  Fort  Smith  that  several  counties  of  Northwest  Arkansas 
were  to  be  attached  to  the  Department  of  Kansas  (DLC-RTL). 

General  Orders  No.  gS1 

War  Department 

General  Orders!  Washington  City, 

No.  98 J  March  12th,  1864. 

The  President  of  the  United  States  orders  as  follows: 

I.  Major  General  H.  W.  Halleck  is,  at  his  own  request,  relieved 
from  duty  as  General-in-Chief  of  the  Army,  and  Lieutenant  Gen- 
eral U.  S.  Grant  is  assigned  to  the  command  of  the  Armies  of 
the  United  States.  The  Head  Quarters  of  the  Army  will  be  in 
Washington,  and  also  with  Lieutenant  General  Grant  in  the  field. 

II.  Major  General  H.  W.  Halleck  is  assigned  to  duty  in  Wash- 
ington as  Chief  of  Staff  of  the  Army,  under  the  direction  of  the 
Secretary  of  War  and  the  Lieutenant  General  commanding.  His 
orders  will  be  obeyed  and  respected  accordingly. 

[239] 


MARCH      12,      1864 

III.  Major  General  W.  T.  Sherman  is  assigned  to  the  command 
of  the  Military  Division  of  the  Mississippi,  composed  of  the  De- 
partments of  the  Ohio,  the  Cumberland,  the  Tennessee,  and  the 
Arkansas. 

IV.  Major  General  J.  B.  McPherson  is  assigned  to  the  command 
of  the  Department  and  Army  of  the  Tennessee. 

By  order  of  the  Secretary  of  War 

ID,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  Adjutant  General,  Letters  Received,  P  1578.  Although 
not  written  by  Lincoln  nor  signed  by  him  as  issued,  this  order  -was  indubitably 
drafted  at  his  direction  and  probably  at  his  personal  dictation  in  response  to 
Halleck's  letter  to  Stanton  of  March  9,  which  Stanton  referred  to  the  presi- 
dent on  the  same  day  with  a  request  for  instructions: 

"Under  the  provisions  of  the  Act  of  April  4th  1862,  which  authorizes  the 
President  to  assign  to  command  officers  of  the  same  grade,  without  regard  to 
seniority,  of  rank,  the  undersigned,  a  Major  General,  was  assigned,  in  July 
1862,  to  the  command  of  the  land  forces  of  the  United  States.  Since  that  time 
the  higher  grade  of  Lieutenant  General  has  been  created,  and  the  distinguished 
officer  promoted  to  that  rank  has  received  his  armies  now  and  reported  for 
duty.  I,  therefore,  respectfully  request  that  orders  be  issued  placing  him  in 
command  of  the  Army  and  retiring  me  from  that  duty.  In  making  this  re- 
quest I  am  influenced  solely  by  a  desire  to  conform  to  the  provisions  of  the 
law,  which,  in  my  opinion  impose  upon  the  Lieutenant  General  the  duties  and 
responsibilities  of  General  in  Chief  of  the  Army."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Isaac  Murphy1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Gov.  Murphy  War  Department, 

Little  Rock,  Ark.  Washington,  D.C.,  March  12    1864. 

I  am  not  appointing  officers  for  Arkansas  now,  and  I  will  try 
to  remember  your  request.  Do  your  best  to  get  out  the  largest  vote 
possible;  and,  of  course,  as  much  of  it  as  possible  on  the  right  side 

A.  LINCOLN 

3-ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  2.  Governor  Murphy 
telegraphed  on  March  11,  1864:  "I  respectfully  ask  you  to  issue  no  commis- 
sions and  to  make  no  appointments  of  any  kind  for  Ark.  until  the  fate  of  our 
present  earnest  and  hopeful  efforts  to  restore  our  State  to  the  Union  is  de- 
termined and  the  undoubted  union  men  have  time  to  be  heard  from."  (DLC- 
RTL). 

Pass  for  Mrs.  J.  R.  Reid1 

Allow  Mrs.  J.  R.  Reid,  with  her  child,  to  take  the  oath  of  Dec. 
8,  1863,  and  pass  our  lines  at  City-Point,  and  go  North. 

March  12,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Hertz,  II,  923. 

[240] 


To  the  Senate1 

Executive  Office 
To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  March  12  1864. 

In  obedience  to  the  resolution  of  the  Senate  of  the  28th  of  Janu- 
ary last,  I  communicate  herewith  a  report,  with  accompanying 
papers,  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  showing  what  portion 
of  the  appropriations  for  the  colonization  of  persons  of  African 
descent  has  been  expended,  and  the  several  steps  which  have  been 
taken  for  the  execution  of  the  Acts  of  Congress  on  that  subject. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  3§A  F6.  The  "12"  in  the  date  was  filled  in  by 
Lincoln.  On  March  14,  this  communication  was  read  in  the  Senate  and  re- 
ferred to  the  select  committee  on  slavery  and  freedmen.  No  record  of  Usher's 
report  has  been  found  in  published  Executive  Documents  or  in  the  National 
Archives.  See  Lincoln's  further  communication  to  the  Senate  on  this  subject, 
June  29,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  12,  1864. 

Gov.  Smith  of  Rhode  Island  brings  you  this.  Please  give  him  a 
full  hearing.  After  a  pretty  full  talk  with  him,  it  seems  to  me  that 
the  one  thing  most  likely  to  surmount  the  difficulty  there,  would 
be  to  not  consolidate  the  ist.  &  3rd.  Cavalry,  but  preserve  them 
both,  the  Governor  to  exert  himself  to  the  utmost  to  fill  both.  The 
consolidation  throws  out  one  set  of  officers,  and  which  ever  set  it 
may  be,  it  offends  either  the  Governor  or  a  U.S.  Senator.  We  can 
not  afford  to  offend  either,  while  we  can  avoid  it.  Please  try.  There 
is  also  a  difficulty  about  Capt.  Silvey,  upon  which  I  hope  you  will 
fully  hear  the  Governor.2  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  NHi. 

2  AGO  Special  Orders  No.   124,  March   22,   1864,   ordered   Captain  Wesley 
Owens,    Fifth   U.S.    Cavalry,   to   relieve   Captain   William    Silvey,    First   U.S. 
Artillery,  as  chief  mustering  and  disbursing  officer  for  Rhode  Island. 

To  Lewis  Wallace1 

March  12,  1864 

Will  Major  General  Lewis  Wallace  please  join  some  other  General 
officers  to  a  Dinner  at  the  Executive  Mansion  at  6-45  o'clock,  this 
evening.  A.  LINCOLN 


March  12,  1864. 

coin's  inviti 
.  Wallace  h 

[241] 


1  ALS,  InHi.  See  Lincoln's  invitation  to  Grant  and  Meade,  March  10,  supra. 
No  reply  from  General  Wallace  has  been  found. 


To  Gideon  Welles1 

[c.  March  12,  1864] 

Has  the  Sec.  of  the  Navy  any  knowledge  of  this  case?  and  if  any, 
what?  A  LINCOLN 

1 AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Joshua 
Hanna,  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  to  Stanton,  March  12,  1864: 

"The  bearer  Capt.  Lewis  F  L  Vandegrift  of  this  city  had  his  boat  taken  from 
him  by  the  Navy  tinder  a  charge  of  violating  the  laws  while  in  the  employ- 
ment of  the  War  department. 

"I  have  known  Capt.  V.  for  many  years,  and  have  had  a  business  transac- 
tion with  [him]  for  several  years.  I  have  no  doubt  of  his  honesty  or  loyalty 
nor  do  I  believe  any  citizen  of  Pittsburgh  would  believe  him  guilty  of  the 
charge.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

Welles  replied  on  March  19:  "I  would  respectfully  state  that  this  Depart- 
ment has  not  been  furnished  by  Rear  Admiral  Porter  with  a  full  report  of 
the  seizure.  On  the  2Oth  ult.  .  .  he  forwarded  to  me  an  appraisement  of  the 
vessel,  stating  that  she  had  been  captured  some  time  since  for  'illicit  trading, 
robbing  plantations  &c.'  and  that  owing  to  the  scarcity  of  transports  he  had 
obtained  permission  from  the  Judge  of  the  District  to  use  her  for  Government 
service.  The  'Volunteer'  was  appraised  at  Twenty-five  thousand  dollars  .  .  . 
and  a  requisition  for  that  sum  was  drawn  by  this  Department  for  the  payment 
of  the  same. 

"You  will  thus  perceive  that  the  case  is  in  the  hands  of  the  District  Court 
at  Springfield,  111.,  and  therefore,  no  longer  under  the  control  of  this  Depart- 
ment." (DLC-RTL). 


To  Meredith  E  Gentry1 

Hon.  M.  E  Gentry  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  13.  1864. 

Yours  by  the  hand  of  Gen.  Grant  is  received.  Of  course  I  have 
not  forgotten  you,  Gen.  Grant  is  hereby  authorized,  in  his  discre- 
tion, to  send  you  South;  and  it  is  rather  my  wish  that  he  may  find 
it  not  inconsistent  with  his  view  of  the  public  interest  to  oblige 
you.  Yours  truly  A.  LUNTCOLIST 

lADfS,  DLC-RTL.  Gentry's  letter  of  February  3,  1864,  reminded  Lincoln 
of  their  early  acquaintance  when  they  were  members  of  congress.  Elected  to 
the  Confederate  Congress,  Gentry  was  ill  at  his  home  in  Shelbyville,  Ten- 
nessee, when  Confederate  forces  retreated.  Permitted  to  remain  for  some  time 
without  taking  an  oath  of  allegiance  to  the  Union,  he  was  later  ordered  to  take 
the  oath  or  go  to  prison:  "They  decided  that  I  should  either  go  beyond  the 
Federal  lines  southward  or  be  sent  a  Prisoner  to  Camp  Chase.  .  .  .  When  the 
case  came  before  Genl  Rouseau  he  took  no  other  action  upon  it,  except  to 
extend  the  Parol  which  had  been  given  me  at  Shelbyville  specifically  to  the 
2ist  of  Febr  Inst — at  which  time  my  term  as  a  member  of  the  Confederate 
Congress  expired.  I  am  now  at  this  City  (Nashville)  to  solicit  his  final  decision. 
Genl  Grants  Head  Quarters  being  here  Genl  Rouseau  has  introduced  me  to 
Genl  Grant  &  I  expressed  to  him  my  wish  to  be  discharged  from  arrest  and  to 
recieve  from  him  a  pass  to  go  south  with  the  privilege  of  returning  when  I 

[242] 


MARCH      13,      1864 

shall  have  attended  to  business  in  that  region  which  if  not  promptly  and  suc- 
cessfully attended  to,  will  involve  me  &  mine,  in  complete  &  entire  pecuniary 
ruin.  Genl  Grant  whilst  giving  a  courteous  hearing  to  my  application  seems  to 
think  that  it  would  be  irregular  for  him  to  decide  upon  the  case,  and  has 
suggested  that  ...  I  should  apply  directly  to  you  .  .  .  and  has  consented  to 
forward  my  Letter,  with  such  endorsement  upon  it  as  will  attract  your  at- 
tention. .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Michael  Halm1 

Private  Executive  Mansion, 

Hon.  Michael  Hahn  Washington, 

My  dear  Sir:  March  13.  1864. 

I  congratulate  you  on  having  fixed  your  name  in  history  as  the 
first-free-state  Governor  of  Louisiana.  Now  you  are  about  to  have 
a  Convention  which,  among  other  things,  will  probably  define  the 
elective  franchise.  I  barely  suggest  for  your  private  consideration, 
whether  some  of  the  colored  people  may  not  be  let  in  —  as,  for  in- 
stance, the  very  intelligent,  and  especially  those  who  have  fought 
gallantly  in  our  ranks.  They  would  probably  help,  in  some  trying 
time  to  come,  to  keep  the  jewel  of  liberty  within  the  family  of 
freedom.  But  this  is  only  a  suggestion,  not  to  the  public,  but  to 
you  alone.  Yours  truly  A. 


i  ALS,  owned  by  Roger  W.  Barrett,  Chicago,  Illinois;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  In 
an  election  held  on  February  22,  1864,  Michael  Hahn  defeated  Benjamin  F. 
Flanders  and  J.  Q.  A.  Fellows  for  governor.  The  new  constitution  drafted  by 
the  convention  which  met  beginning  April  6  and  adopted  at  an  election  held 
on  September  5,  1864,  contained  no  provisions  for  Negro  suffrage. 


To  Carl  Schurz1 

Private.  Executive  Mansion, 

Major  General  Schurz  Washington, 

My  dear  Sir:  March  13,  1864. 

Yours  of  February  2Qth,  reached  me  only  four  days  ago;  but 
the  delay  was  of  little  consequence,  because  I  found,  on  feeling 
around,  I  could  not  invite  you  here  without  a  difficulty  which  at 
least  would  be  unpleasant,  and  perhaps  would  be  detrimental  to 
the  public  service.  Allow  me  to  suggest  that  if  you  wish  to  remain 
in  the  military  service,  it  is  very  dangerous  for  you  to  get  tem- 
porarily out  of  it;  because,  with  a  Major  General  once  out,  it  is 
next  to  impossible  for  even  the  President  to  get  him  in  again. 
With  my  appreciation  of  your  ability,  and  correct  principle,  of 
course  I  would  be  very  glad  to  have  your  service  for  the  country 

[243] 


MARCH      14,      1864 

in  the  approaching  political  canvass;  but  I  fear  we  can  not  prop- 
erly have  it,  without  separating  you  from  the  military.  Yours 
truly  ^*  LINCOLN 

1  LS  copy,  DLC-RTL.  The  signed  copy  preserved  in  the  Lincoln  Papers  is 
followed  immediately  by  the  autograph  draft  of  Lincoln's  letter  to  Schurz  of 
March  23,  infra,  which  explains  that  the  original  letter  of  March  1 3  was  never 
received  by  Schurz.  On  February  29,  1864,  Schurz  wrote  Lincoln  from  New  York: 

"Yesterday  I  arrived  here  on  a  short  leave  of  absence.  It  was  my  intention 
to  attend  the  meeting  of  the  National  Committee  on  the  22d  but  I  could  not 
leave  my  command  in  time  on  account  of  Gen.  Howard's  absence. 

"I  should  be  glad  to  have  a  conversation  with  you  about  political  matters  and 
should  already  have  called  upon  you  but  for  the  necessity  of  having  first  the 
permission  of  the  War  Dept.  to  go  to  Washington.  An  arrangement  might  per- 
haps be  made  which  might  render  it  possible  for  me  to  take  an  active  part  in 
the  presidential  canvass.  Things  seem  to  be  in  a  somewhat  confused  state,  and 
...  I  ...  fear  the  consequences  of  the  contest  now  being  carried  on  inside 
of  the  Union-party.  ... 

"If  it  should  be  agreeable  to  you  to  see  me  at  Washington,  please  let  me 
know  as  soon  as  convenient — not  to  forget  the  required  permission  from  the 
War  Dept.,  as  I  should  not  like  to  be  arrested. 

"I  am  very  glad  you  gave  Sigel  the  Dept.  of  West- Virginia.  It  was  a  very 
judicious  measure  in  every  respect. 

"Have  you  heard  already  of  the  difficulties  between  Gen.  Hooker  and  my- 
self, of  the  court  of  inquiry  I  demanded  and  obtained  and  of  the  opinion  of 
that  court  in  my  favor  and  against  Hooker?  If  you  have  been  informed  of 
what  happened  there,  you  will  already  have  come  to  the  conclusion  that  it  is 
impossible  for  me  to  continue  in  my  command  .  .  .  and  ardently  hope  that  the 
rumor  about  Gen.  Hooker's  being  transferred  ...  in  consequence  of  Gen. 
Grant's  and  Thomas'  representations  to  the  War  Dept.,  prove  true.  .  .  ." 
(DLC-RTL). 

On  March  8,  Schurz  wrote  again:  "Several  days  ago  ...  I  wrote  you  a 
few  lines  for  the  purpose  of  bringing  about  an  interview  with  you  at  which 
we  might  exchange  our  views  on  pending  political  questions.  I  requested  you 
to  let  me  know  whether  this  -would  be  agreeable.  ...  I  desire  to  have  that 
interview  .  .  .  not  only  because  I  am  as  warm  a  friend  of  our  common  cause 
as  ever,  but  your  friend  also.  Waiting  for  a  few  words  in  reply  in  vain,  I  have 
come  to  the  conclusion  that  either  you  did  not  receive  my  letter  or  do  not 
desire  me  to  visit  Washington.  If  the  latter  should  be  the  case  it  would  oblige 
me  by  simply  advising  me  of  it.  My  leave  will  soon  expire.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.}.  See 
further,  Lincoln's  letter  to  Schurz,  March  23,  infra. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington,  March  14,   1864. 

i  Lieut,  and  Adjt.  of  6.  Wisconsin  Volunteers,  Edward  P.  Brooks 
is  a  prisoner  of  War  at  Richmond;  and  if  you  can,  without  diffi- 
culty, effect  a  special  exchange  for  him,  I  shall  be  obliged. 

A. 


*ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  ±07,  Presidential  Telegrams,   I,    5.    General   Butler's 
telegram  in  reply  was  received  at  6:25  P.M.:   "Lieut.  Brooks  will  be  sent  for- 

[244] 


MARCH      14,      1864 

ward  for  special  exchange  and  I  have  no  doubt  the  exchange  will  be  effected." 
(DLC-RTL).  See  also  Lincoln  to  Butler,  March  18,  infra. 

Draft  Order  for  200,000  Men1 

Executive  Mansion. 
Washington,  March  14th  1864. 

In  order  to  supply  the  force  required  to  be  drafted  for  the  Navy, 
and  to  provide  an  adequate  reserve  force  for  all  contingencies,  — 
in  addition  to  the  five  hundred  thousand  men  called  for  February 
ist.  1864,  a  call  is  hereby  made  and  a  draft  ordered  for  two  hun- 
dred thousand  men  for  the  "military  service"  (Army,  Navy,  and 
Marine  Corps)  of  the  United  States. 

The  proportional  quotas  for  the  different  wards,  towns,  town- 
ships, precincts  or  election  districts,  or  counties,  will  be  made 
known  through  the  Provost  Marshal  General's  Bureau,  and  ac- 
count will  be  taken  of  the  credits  and  deficiencies  on  former 
quotas. 

The  15th.  day  of  April,  1864,  is  designated  as  the  time  up  to 
which  the  numbers  required  from  each  "ward  of  a  city,  town,"  &c. 
may  be  raised  by  voluntary  enlistment,  and  drafts  will  be  made 
in  "each  ward  of  a  city,  town,"  &c.  which  shall  not  have  filled  the 
quota  assigned  to  it  within  the  time  designated,  for  the  number 
required  to  fill  said  quotas.  The  draft  will  be  commenced  as  soon 
after  the  15th.  of  April  as  practicable. 

The  Government  bounties,  as  now  paid,  continue  until  April 
ist,  1864,  at  which  time  the  additional  bounties  cease.  On  and 
after  that  date,  one  hundred  dollars  bounty  only  will  be  paid,  as 
provided  by  the  act  approved  July  22d.  1861. 

ABRAHAM 


1  DS,  IHi.  This  order  was  issued  as  AGO  General  Orders  No.  *oo,  March 
15,  1864. 

Endorsement1 

If  this  womans  husband  is  in  our  service,  let  her  have  transporta- 
tion home.  A  LINCOLN 

March.  14.   1864 

*  AES,  owned  by  C.  Norton  Owen,  Glencoe,  Illinois.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  letter  signed  "Mrs.  Sterry"  and  addressed  to  Mrs.  Lincoln,  March 
15:  "The  bearer  of  this  note  has  a  Husband  in  the  153^  regt  (that  have  gone 
to  Texas)  and  she  is  left  destitute.  It  will  be  a  deed  of  charity  for  you  to  help 
her  she  wants  to  get  home  she  has  no  friends  here  is  stranger  in  the  City 
she  is  a  nice  respectable  Old  Lady." 

[245] 


Memorandum  : 
Appointment  of  Thornton  A.  Jenkins,  Jr.1 

Capt.  Fox  is  very  anxious  for  this  young  man.          A.  LINCOLN 
March  14,  1864. 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1864,  No.  309.  Lincoln's 
endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Gustavus  V.  Fox  to  Nicolay,  March  14, 
1864,  introducing  Thornton  A.  Jenkins,  Jr.,  and  requesting  an  interview  for 
him.  There  is  no  record  of  an  appointment  for  Jenkins. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate,  Executive  Mansion, 

of  the  United  States.  Washington,  March  [14],  1864. 

I  transmit,  herewith,  a  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior, 
of  the  nth  instant,  containing  the  information  requested  in  Senate 
Resolution  of  the  2Qth  ultimo.  ABRAHAM 


1  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38A  F6.  This  communication  is  docketed  by  the 
clerk  as  read  in  the  Senate  on  March  14,  referred  to  the  committee  on  Indian 
affairs,  and  ordered  to  be  printed,  but  the  Senate  Journal  supplies  the  date  as 
March  8,  which  is  obviously  incorrect  in  view  of  enclosures  dated  March  10 
and  March  11,  1864.  Senator  James  H.  Lane's  resolution  of  February  29, 
1864,  requested  the  president  to  furnish  "the  amount  of  money  received  by 
the  government  for  the  sale  of  the  Wea  trust  lands  in  Kansas,  and  the  manner 
in  which  said  money  was  invested;  if  in  State  bonds,  what  states,  and  whether 
the  interest  of  said  State  bonds  has  been  paid;  and  if  any  of  said  bonds  were 
stolen,  what  ones,  and  what  provision  has  been  made  for  the  bonds  so  stolen." 
Concerning  the  so-called  "Russell  Fraud,"  see  note  to  Lincoln's  letter  to  Bates, 
March  11,  1861,  supra.  Secretary  Usher's  report  of  March  11,  1864,  trans- 
mitted with  Lincoln's  communication  supra,  may  be  found  in  Senate  Execu- 
tive Document  No.  28. 


To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

March  14,  1864 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives: 

I  transmit  to  Congress  a  copy  of  a  Treaty  between  the  United 
States  and  Great  Britain,  for  the  final  settlement  of  the  claims  of 
the  Hudson's  Bay  and  Puget's  Sound  Agricultural  Companies, 
concluded  on  the  ist.  of  July,  last,  the  ratifications  of  which  were 
exchanged  in  this  City,  on  the  5th.  instant;  and  recommend  an 
appropriation  to  carry  into  effect  the  first,  second,  and  third  ar- 
ticles thereof.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  14th.  March,  1864. 

[246] 


MARCH     15,     1864 

IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38A  F2;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive 
Document  No.  54.  The  first,  second,  and  third  articles  of  the  treaty  provided 
for  the  appointment  of  a  commissioner  to  investigate  rights  of  the  Hudson  Bay 
and  Puget  Sound  Agricultural  Companies.  An  act  approved  June  27,  1864, 
authorized  the  president  to  appoint  a  commissioner  and  a  clerk  and  appro- 
priated necessary  funds. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

March  14,  1864 
To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives: 

On  the  25th.  day  of  November  1862,  a  Convention  for  the  mu- 
tual adjustment  of  claims  pending  between  the  United  States  and 
Ecuador,  was  signed  at  Quito  by  the  plenipotentiaries  of  the  con- 
tracting parties.  A  copy  is  herewith  enclosed. 

This  Convention,  already  ratified  by  this  Government,  has  been 
sent  to  Quito  for  the  customary  exchange  of  ratifications,  which 
it  is  not  doubted  will  be  promptly  effected,  As  the  stipulations  of 
the  instrument  require  that  the  Commissioners  who  are  to  be 
appointed  pursuant  to  its  provisions  shall  meet  at  Guayaquil 
within  ninety  days  after  such  exchange,  it  is  desirable  that  the 
legislation  necessary  to  give  effect  to  the  Convention  on  the  part 
of  the  United  States,  should  anticipate  the  usual  course  of  pro- 
ceeding. I  therefore  invite  the  early  attention  of  Congress  to  the 
subject.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington  March  14,  1864. 

i  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  38 A  F2;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive 
Document  No.  55.  An  act  approved  March  28,  1864,  authorized  appointment 
of  a  commissioner  and  appropriated  necessary  funds. 


Endorsement  Concerning  Churches 
in  New  Orleans1 

March  15,  1864 

While  I  leave  this  case  to  the  discretion  of  Gen.  Banks,  my  view 
is,  that  the  U.S.  should  not  appoint  trustees  for  or  in  any  way 
take  charge  of  any  church  as  such.  If  the  building  is  needed  for 
military  purposes,  take  it;  if  it  is  not  so  needed,  let  its  church 
people  have  it,  dealing  with  any  disloyal  people  among  them,  as 
you  deal  with  other  disloyal  people.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  15th.  1864 

1Copy,  DLC-RTL.  The  copy  of  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on  a  copy  of  a 
letter  from  Elijah  Guion,  Thomas  Sloo,  and  John  B.  Morison,  of  New  Orleans, 

[247] 


MARCH      15,      1864 

March  5,  1864,  complaining  of  an  order  by  General  James  Bowen  requiring 
them  to  surrender  the  keys  and  property  of  St.  Paul's  Church. 

To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

Private  Executive  Mansion 

Lieut.  Genl.  Grant  Washington,  B.C. 

Nashville,  Term.  March  15.  1864 

Gen.  McPherson  having  been  assigned  to  the  command  of  a 
Department,  could  not  Gen.  Frank  Blair  without  difficulty  or 
detriment  to  the  service,  be  assigned  to  command  the  corps  he 
commanded  a  while  last  autumn?  A  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  6.  Grant  replied  on 
March  16:  "General  Logan  commands  the  corps  referred  to  in  your  despatch. 
I  "will  see  General  Sherman  within  a  few  days  and  consult  him  about  the 
transfer,  and  answer."  On  March  17  Grant  telegraphed  again:  "General  Sher- 
man is  here.  He  consents  to  the  transfer  of  General  Logan  to  the  seventeenth 
corps  and  the  appointment  of  General  F.  P.  Blair  to  the  fifteenth  corps."  On 
March  26  General  John  A.  Logan  telegraphed:  "I  understand  by  the  papers 
that  it  is  contemplated  to  make  a  change  of  commanders  of  the  i£th  and  i7th 
army  corps,  so  as  to  transfer  me  to  the  i7th.  I  hope  this  will  not  be  done.  I 
fully  understand  the  organization  of  the  15th  corps  now  ...  I  ...  earnestly 
hope  that  the  change  may  not  be  made."  Finally  Grant  notified  Sherman  on 
March  31  that  "General  F.  P.  Blair  will  be  assigned  to  the  seventeenth  (i7th) 
corps,  and  not  the  fifteenth,  (±5th.).  .  .  ."  (Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Ses- 
sion, House  Executive  Document  No.  8ot  pp.  4-5). 

AGO  General  Orders  No.  98,  March  12,  1864,  assigned  McPherson  to  com- 
mand the  Department  of  the  Tennessee  and  Sherman  to  replace  Grant  in  com- 
mand of  the  Military  Division  of  the  Mississippi.  AGO  General  Orders  No.  178, 
April  23,  1864,  assigned  Blair  to  command  the  Seventeenth  Army  Corps.  See 
Lincoln  to  Stanton,  April  21,  and  to  the  House  of  Representatives,  April  28, 
infra. 

To  Michael  Hahn1 

His  Excellency  Executive  Mansion, 

Michael  Hahn  Washington, 

Governor  of  Louisiana  March  15.  1864. 

Until  further  order,  you  are  hereby  invested  with  the  powers 
exercised  hitherto  by  the  Military  Governor  of  Louisiana.  Yours 
truly  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  With  this  letter  Lincoln  enclosed  copies  of  the  commission  of 
General  George  F.  Shepley  and  War  Department  instructions  to  Shepley  of 
June  3,  1862  (OR,  III,  IV,  182).  On  April  6  Governor  Hahn  wrote  Lincoln: 
"Your  private  letter  of  ...  the  13th  and  official  letter  of  the  i5th  .  .  .  came 
duly  to  hand.  I  thank  you  sincerely  for  the  kind  and  confiding  manner  in 
which  you  have  always  treated  me,  and  I  can  only  promise  in  return  that  be- 
sides doing  all  in  my  power  towards  the  restoration  of  the  Union,  I  shall  feel 
pleasure  in  seeing  it  restored  under  your  administration.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

[248] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If  the  vacancy  has  not  been  filled,  let  the  within  request  be 
granted.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  15.  1864 

1 AES,  owned  by  Harry  E.  Blake,  Alhambra,  California.  Lincoln's  endorse- 
ment is  written  on  a  letter  from  Senator  James  R.  Doolittle  and  others,  March 
12,  1864,  asking  reappointment  of  Captain  Edward  Sanford  Blake  of  Wisconsin 
who  had  resigned  because  of  illness  on  October  6,  1863.  No  record  of  his  re- 
appointment  has  been  found. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  March  15.  1864. 

Please  see  the  gallant  Drummer-boy,  Robert  H.  Hendershot, 
whose  history  is  briefly  written  on  the  fine  drum  presented  him 
which  he  now  carries.  He  must  have  a  chance,  and  if  you  can  find 
any  situation  suitable  to  him,  I  shall  be  obliged.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1 ALS,  IHi.  Robert  H.  Hendershot  of  the  Eighth  Michigan  Volunteers,  born 
in  December,  1850,  was  barely  twelve  years  old  when  he  distinguished  him- 
self at  the  Battle  of  Fredericksburg  on  December  13,  1862.  He  was  discharged 
for  disability  at  Falmouth,  Virginia,  December  27,  1862,  and  accounts  of  his 
exploits  in  the  Battle  of  Murfreesboro,  are  unreliable.  Following  his  discharge, 
he  became  something  of  a  celebrity  and  an  attraction  at  Barnum's  Museum. 
His  drum,  referred  to  by  Lincoln,  was  the  present  of  the  Tribune  Association 
of  New  York.  There  is  no  record  of  his  appointment  by  Stanton,  but  he  was 
eventually  employed  as  messenger  in  the  office  of  U.S.  Treasurer  Francis  E. 
Spinner  who  recommended  that  he  be  appointed  to  West  Point  on  January  i, 
1865  (see  Lincoln's  endorsement  of  January  i,  1865,  infra).  According  to 
William  S.  Dodge,  Robert  Henry  Hendershot;  or,  The  Brave  Drummer  Boy 
of  the  Rappahannock  (Chicago,  1867),  his  appointment  was  the  last  one  Lin- 
coln made  for  West  Point,  but  no  record  has  been  found  of  his  entrance.  See 
also  Frank  Moore,  The  Civil  War  in  Song  and  Story,  i86o-i86$  (New  York, 
),  pp.  245-46. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

Dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  15,  1864. 

I  understand  a  question  exists  as  to  the  time  the  Pennsylvania 
Reserve  Corps'  term  expires.  Let  them  have  their  own  way  upon 
that,  unless  it  would  cause  very  considerable  injury.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  ORB.  On  March  4,  1864  Governor  Curtin  wrote  Lincoln:  "In  May, 
1861,  the  Legislature  of  Pennsylvania  directed  fifteen  regiments  to  be  raised, 

[249] 


MARCH     15,      1864 

subsisted,  and  instructed  by  the  State,  to  be  called  the  Pennsylvania  Reserve 
Corps.  .  .  .  This  division  was  enlisted  for  three  years,  and  sworn  into  the  serv- 
ice of  the  State  in  ...  June  and  July,  1861,  and  was  to  be  turned  over  to  the 
United  States  whenever  it  should  be  called  for.  .  .  .  After  the  battle  of  Bull 
Run  the  whole  division  was  wanted  by  the  United  States.  .  .  .  The  three 
years  for  which  the  men  enlisted  count  from  the  date  of  their  being  mustered 
into  the  service  of  the  State.  They  are  now  told  .  .  .  that  they  will  be  held  for 
three  years  from  the  date  of  their  being  mustered  into  the  service  of  the  United 
States.  The  United  States  may  thus  gain  a  few  days,  or  even  a  month's  service, 
at  the  expense  of  creating  dissatisfaction  and  losing  the  men  for  a  new  period 
of  three  years.  .  .  ."  (OR,  I,  XXXIII,  636-38). 

On  April  30  Thomas  M.  Vincent  instructed  General  Meade  to  discharge  the 
men  as  of  the  date  of  their  state  muster.  (Ibid.,  p.  1032). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Private  Executive  Mansion, 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Washington, 

My  dear  Sir,  March  15,  1864. 

I  shall  be  personally  obliged  if  you  will  allow  Silas  H.  Highley 
to  take  the  oath  of  Dec.  8.  and  be  discharged.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

ES.  He  is  at  Alton,  Illinois.         A  L. 

l  ALS,  NHi.  Edward  Bates'  Diary  under  date  of  March  15,  1864,  notes  that 
"I  have  succeeded,  at  last,  in  getting  the  order  for  the  discharge  of  young  Silas 
Highley,  of  St.  Joe  .  .  .  and  his  father,  the  old  Captain,  has  gone  home  re- 
joicing, with  the  order  in  his  pocket." 

To  Whom  It  May  Concern1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Whom  it  may  concern.  March  15.  1864. 

Major  General  Sickles  is  making  a  tour  for  me  from  here  by 
way  of  Cairo,  New-Orleans,  and  returning  by  the  Gulf  and  Ocean; 
and  all  Land  and  Naval  officers  and  employees,  are  directed  to 
furnish  reasonable  transportation  and  other  reasonable  facilities 
to  himself  and  personal  Staff,  not  inconsistent  with  the  public 
service.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

1  ALS  copy,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Steele,  February  25,  supra. 

To  Isaac  Murphy1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Gov.  Isaac  Murphy  War  Department, 

Little  Rock,  Ark  Washington,  B.C.,  March  i6th.  1864. 

What  of  your  election  on  the  14th.?  A.  LINCOLN 

[250] 


MARCH     17,     1864 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  7.  Governor  Murphy's 
reply  sent  on  March  16,  was  received  at  i  A.M.  on  March  17:  "Polls  close 
tonight  twelve  (12)  M.  We  are  confident  of  victory  A  heavy  vote  here,  not 
counted,  will  send  results  as  soon  as  known."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  March  17,  1864. 

If  you  obtain  the  remains  of  Col.  Dahlgren,  please  notify  me 
instantly,  so  that  I  can  let  his  afflicted  know  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  9.  See  Lincoln  to  But- 
ler, March  7,  supra.  Butler  replied  the  same  day,  "The  President  shall  be  in- 
formed of  the  arrival  of  Col  Dahlgren's  remains  at  the  earliest  possible  mo- 
ment. Probably  on  Sunday"  (DLC-Butler  Papers). 


To  John  A.  J.  CreswelP 

Hon.  John  A.  J.  Creswell  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  17,  1864. 

It  needs  not  to  be  a  secret,  that  I  wish  success  to  emancipation 
in  Maryland.  It  would  aid  much  to  end  the  rebellion.  Hence  it  is 
a  matter  of  national  consequence,  in  which  every  national  man, 
may  rightfully  feel  a  deep  interest.  I  sincerely  hope  the  friends 
of  the  measure  will  allow  no  minor  considerations  to  divide  and 
distract  them.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS-F,  ISLA;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Creswell,  March  7,  supra. 
The  new  Maryland  constitution,  drafted  by  the  convention  which  met  at  An- 
napolis on  April  27,  and  adopted  at  the  election  of  October  12  and  13,  1864, 
prohibited  slavery  by  its  Article  Twenty-three. 

Order  for  Discharge  of  Christopher  C.  Callan 
and  Daniel  R.  Payne1 

March  17,  1864 

Let  Christopher  C.  Callan  and  Daniel  R.  Payne,  named  within, 
take  the  oath  of  Dec.  8,  and  be  discharged  and  remain  hereabouts 
for  the  object  within  indicated  A.  LINCOLN 

March  17,  1864 

1  AES,  owned  by  R.  E.  Burdick,  New  York  City.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  letter  from  Judge  John  C.  Underwood,  U.S.  District  Court,  Alex- 
andria, Virginia,  March  14,  1864,  asking  discharge  of  Captain  Christopher  C. 
Callan  and  Private  Daniel  R.  Payne,  Confederate  deserters,  who  had  "cheer- 
fully given  most  important  testimony  for  the  government"  and  would  be  im- 
portant witnesses  in  other  cases. 

[251] 


To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Major  Gen'l  Rosecrans.  Executive  Mansion, 

St:  Louis,  Mo.  Washington,  March  i/th.  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  John  T.  Abshier,  citizen, 
until  further  orders.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Maj:  Eckert 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch        JNO.  G.  NICOLAY 

Priv:  Sec 

i  D,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  8.  The  telegram  is  in  the 
handwriting  of  Edward  Neill,  and  signed  by  Nicolay.  No  reply  has  been  found. 
John  T.  Abshier,  citizen  of  Missouri,  was  sentenced  to  be  hanged  for  murder 
and  "violation  of  laws  and  customs  of  war."  General  Rosecrans  recommended 
commutation  to  imprisonment  because  of  Abshier's  youth  and  the  loyalty  of 
his  family.  On  February  9,  1864,  however,  Lincoln  approved  the  death  sen- 
tence (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1001).  AGO  Special 
Orders  No.  134,  April  i,  1864,  commuted  the  sentence  to  imprisonment. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler,  Executive  Mansion, 

Fortress  Monroe.  Washington,  March  i8th,  1864. 

Edward  P.  Brooks,  ist  Lieutenant  6th  Wisconsin,  is  a  prisoner  of 
war,  at  Richmond.  I  desire,  that  if  practicable  his  special  exchange 
be  effected  for  a  rebel  prisoner  of  same  rank.  Have  you  one  to 
send,  and  can  you  arrange  it  at  once?  A,  LINCOLN 

Maj:  Eckert 
Please  send  the  above  dispatch        JNO.  G.  NICOLAY 

Priv:  Sec 

ID,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  n.  The  telegram  is  in 
the  handwriting  of  Edward  Neill  and  signed  by  Nicolay.  See  Lincoln  to  Butler, 
March  14,  supra.  Butler  replied  the  same  day:  "The  exchange  desired  has  been 
proposed,  Boat  leaves  tonight."  (DLC-Butler  Papers).  On  March  23  he  wrote 
further:  "I  have  the  honor  to  report  to  you  the  exchange  of  Edward  P.  Brooks, 
ist.  Lieut.  6th.  Regt.  Wis.  Vols,  concerning  whom  you  telegraphed  me  the 
other  day.  He  is  now  on  board  the  Flag  of  Truce  boat  which  has  just  re- 
turned from  City  Point.  The  boat  brought  down  more  than  nine  hundred 
(900)  men  and  sixty  three  (63)  officers.  I  have  the  honor  also  to  enclose  an 
open  letter  sent  by  the  same  Flag  of  Truce  directed  to  yourself.  .  .  ."  (DLC- 
RTL). 

Endorsement  Concerning  Benjamin  A.  Watson1 

March  18,  1864 

The  writer  of  this  resides  in  my  town,  is  an  intimate  acquaintance 
and  friend,  and  is  of  good  character,  and  good  qualification  for  the 

[252] 


MARCH      l89      1864 

business  he  seeks  to  be  engaged  in.  I  know  nothing  of  the  particu- 
lar case.  A.  LINCOLN 
March  18.  1864 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Benjamin  A. 
Watson  of  W.  W.  Watson  &  Son,  confectioners  at  Springfield,  Illinois,  March 
12,  1864: 

"There  is  some  talk  about  town  that  there  will  be  a  Tost  Sutler'  appointed 
for  *Camp  Butler' 

"I  have  an  appointment  from  Gov  Yates  under  -which  I  have  bought  a  stock 
of  goods  for  the  Camp,  if  there  is  to  be  any  change  made  at  Camp  Butler,  am 
I  asking  too  much  of  you  to  say  to  Mr  Stanton  to  give  me  the  commission  of 
'Post  Sutler'  for  'Camp  Butler.'  " 

No  further  reference  has  been  found. 

To  Isaac  Murphy1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Gov.  Murphy  War  Department, 

Little-Rock,  Ark.  Washington,  B.C.  March  18.  1864. 

Yours  of  yesterday  received,  &  thanks  for  it.  Send  further  re- 
turns when  you  receive  them.  Will  do  my  best  to  protect  people 
and  new  State  government,  but  can  act  with  no  better  intentions 
than  have  always  done.  Tell  Gen.  Steele  I  have  Randolph's  par- 
don2 &  will  send  by  mail  if  he  says  so.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  10.  Governor  Murphy's 
telegram  of  March  17  is  as  follows:  "Only  eight  counties  heard  from  they 
give  3,556  votes — only  137  votes  against  constitution.  We  feel  sure  of  10,000 
when  the  other  counties  are  heard  from  &  soldiers  vote  obtained.  Guerrillas 
made  immense  efforts  to  hinder  the  election.  The  people  are  full  of  enthusiasm 
but  much  alarmed  Will  you  give  them  assurance  of  the  energetic  protection 
of  the  government — praise  be  to  God!"  (DLC-RTL). 

A  telegram  from  Murphy  sent  on  March  22  but  not  received  until  March 
27,  is  as  follows:  "More  than  eight  Thousand  (8000)  votes  reported,  the  entire 
vote  will  exceed  ten  thousand  (10,000)  the  people  have  been  enthusiastic  in 
view  of  the  protection  of  law  voting  in  immense  risk  of  loss  of  life  &  property, 
the  guerrilas  having  threatened  to  hang  every  one,  that  went  to  the  polls. 
Should  the  army  leave  the  line  of  the  Arkansas  unprotected  terror  would 
prevail  the  state.  Will  the  Gov't  accept  of  two  (2)  regts.  of  artillery,  one  (i) 
black  &  a  regt  of  Cavalry  armed  for  pursuit  of  guerrilas.  The  swamps  & 
mountains  are  full  of  armed  rebels  waiting  for  the  movement  of  the  army 
to  pounce  upon  unprotected  points.  ...  As  it  is,  the  risk  is  great.  All  may  be 
lost  that  has  been  gained  by  the  election.  We  need  arms  to  arm  the  loyal.  .  .  ." 
(DLC-RTL).  2  See  Lincoln  to  Bates,  March  7,  supra. 

Remarks  at  Closing  of  Sanitary  Fair, 
Washington,  B.C.1 

March  18,  1864 

Ladies  and  Gentlemen:  I  appear  to  say  but  a  word.  This  extra- 
ordinary war  in  which  we  are  engaged  falls  heavily  upon  all 

[253] 


MARCH      18,      1864 

classes  of  people,  but  the  most  heavily  upon  the  soldier.  For  it  has 
been  said,  all  that  a  man  hath  will  he  give  for  his  life;  and  while 
all  contribute  of  their  substance  the  soldier  puts  his  life  at  stake, 
and  often  yields  it  up  in  his  country's  cause.  The  highest  merit, 
then,  is  due  to  the  soldier.  [Cheers.] 

In  this  extraordinary  war  extraordinary  developments  have 
manifested  themselves,  such  as  have  not  been  seen  in  former  wars; 
and  amongst  these  manifestations  nothing  has  been  more  re- 
markable than  these  fairs  for  the  relief  of  suffering  soldiers  and 
their  families.  And  the  chief  agents  in  these  fairs  are  the  women 
of  America.  [Cheers.] 

I  am  not  accustomed  to  the  use  of  language  of  eulogy;  I  have 
never  studied  the  art  of  paying  compliments  to  women;  but  I  must 
say  that  if  all  that  has  been  said  by  orators  and  poets  since  the 
creation  of  the  world  in  praise  of  woman  were  applied  to  the 
women  of  America,  it  would  not  do  them  justice  for  their  conduct 
during  this  war.  I  will  close  by  saying  God  bless  the  women  of 
America!  [Great  applause.] 

1  Washington  Evening  Star,  March  19,  1864.  This  item  is  misdated  March 
16,  1864,  by  Hertz  (II,  923)  and  Lapsley  (VII,  105).  This  is  the  most  complete 
report  of  Lincoln's  remarks  which  has  been  found.  A  briefer  version  appeared 
in  the  Morning  Chronicle  and  other  papers. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War:  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  18.  1864. 

I  am  so  pressed  in  regard  to  prisoners  of  war  in  our  custody, 
whose  homes  are  within  our  lines,  and  who  wish  to  not  be  ex- 
changed, but  to  take  the  oath  and  be  discharged,  that  I  hope  you 
will  pardon  me  for  again  calling  up  the  subject.  My  impression  is 
that  we  will  not  ever  force  the  exchange  of  any  of  this  class;  that 
taking  the  oath,  and  being  discharged,  none  of  them  will  again  go 
to  the  rebellion,  but  the  rebellion  again  coming  to  them,  a  consider- 
able per  centage  of  them,  probably  not  a  majority,  would  rejoin 
it;  that  by  a  cautious  discrimination  the  number  so  discharged 
would  not  be  large  enough  to  do  any  considerable  mischief  in 
any  event;  would  relieve  distress  in,  at  least  some  meritorious 
cases;  and  would  give  me  some  relief  from  an  intolerable  pressure. 


DLC-Stanton  Papers;  ADf,  DLC-RTL.  The  letter  sent  to  Stanton  is 
reproduced  as  sent,  but  represents  only  the  first  paragraph  of  the  draft.  The 
remainder  of  the  draft  is  reproduced  following  Lincoln's  signature.  Stanton  re- 
plied on  March  19:  "Your  order  for  the  discharge  of  any  prisoners  of  war,  will 
be  cheerfully  &  promptly  obeyed."  (DLC-RTL). 

[254] 


MARCH      l89      1864 

I  shall  be  glad  therefore  to  have  your  cheerful  assent  to  the  dis- 
charge of  those  whose  names  I  may  send,  which  I  will  only  do 
with  circumspection.  Yours  truly  A  LINCOLN 

In  using  the  strong  hand,  as  now  compelled  to  do,  the  government 
has  a  difficult  duty  to  perform.  At  the  very  best,  it  will  by  turns 
do  both  too  little  and  too  much.  It  can  properly  have  no  motive  of 
revenge,  no  purpose  to  punish  merely  for  punishment's  sake. 
While  we  must,  by  all  available  means,  prevent  the  overthrow 
of  the  government,  we  should  avoid  planting  and  cultivating  too 
many  thorns  in  the  bosom  of  society.  These  general  remarks  ap- 
ply to  several  classes  of  cases,  on  each  of  which  I  wish  to  say  a 
word. 

First,  the  dismissal  of  officers  when  neither  incompetency,  nor 
intentional  wrong,  nor  real  injury  to  the  service,  is  imputed.  In 
such  cases  it  is  both  cruel  and  impolitic,  to  crush  the  man, .and 
make  him  and  his  friends  permanent  enemies  to  the  administra- 
tion if  not  to  the  government  itself.  I  think  of  two  instances. 
One  wherein  a  Surgeon,  for  the  benefit  of  patients  in  his  charge, 
needed  some  lumber,  and  could  only  get  it  by  making  a  false  cer- 
tificate wherein  the  lumber  was  denominated  "butter  &  eggs"  and 
he  was  dismissed  for  the  false  certificate.  The  other  a  Surgeon  by 
the  name  of  Owen2  who  served  from  the  beginning  of  the  war  till 
recently,  with  two  servants,  and  without  objection,  when  upon 
discovery  that  the  servants  were  his  own  sons,  he  was  dismissed. 

Another  class  consists  of  those  who  are  known  or  strongly  sus- 
pected, to  be  in  sympathy  with  the  rebellion.  An  instance  of  this 
is  the  family  of  Southern,8  who  killed  a  recruiting  officer  last  au- 
tumn, in  Maryland.  He  fled,  and  his  family  are  driven  from  their 
home,  without  a  shelter  or  crumb,  except  when  got  by  burthen- 
ing  our  friends  more  than  our  enemies.  Southern  had  no  justifica- 
tion to  kill  the  officer;  and  yet  he  would  not  have  been  killed  if 
he  had  proceeded  in  the  temper  and  manner  agreed  upon  by  your- 
self and  Gov.  Bradford.  But  this  is  past.  What  is  to  be  done  with 
the  family?  Why  can  they  not  occupy  their  old  home,  and  excite 
much  less  opposition  to  the  government  than  the  manifestation  of 
their  distress  is  now  doing?  If  the  house  is  really  needed  for  the 
public  service;  or  if  it  has  been  regularly  confiscated  and  the  title 
transferred,  the  case  is  different. 

2  The  only  surgeon  of  this  name  who  has  been  identified  -was  Joshua  J.  Owen 
of  Pennsylvania,  appointed  August  3,  1861,  and  mustered  out  on  July  27,  1865. 
No  record  has  been  found  of  his  dismissal. 

3  Concerning    John    H.    Sothoron,    see    the    note    to    Lincoln's    telegram    to 
Schenck,  October  21,  and  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  November  22,  1863,  supra. 

[255] 


MARCH      l89      1864 

Again,  the  cases  of  persons,  mostly  women,  wishing  to  pass  our 
lines,  one  way  or  the  other.  We  have,  in  some  cases,  been  ap- 
parantly,  if  not  really,  inconsistent  upon  this  subject — that  is,  we 
have  forced  some  to  go  who  wished  to  stay,  and  forced  others  to 
stay  who  wished  to  go.  Suppose  we  allow  all  females,  with  un- 
grown  children  of  either  sex,  to  go  South,  if  they  desire,  upon  ab- 
solute prohibition  against  returning  during  the  war;  and  all  to 
come  North  upon  the  same  condition  of  not  returning  during  the 
war,  and  the  additional  condition  of  taking  the  oath. 

I  wish  to  mention  two  special  cases — both  of  which  you  well 
remember.  The  first  is  that  of  Yocum.4  He  was  unquestionably 
guilty.  No  one  asking  for  his  pardon  pretends  the  contrary.  What 
he  did,  however,  was  perfectly  lawful,  only  a  short  while  before, 
and  the  change  making  it  unlawful  had  not,  even  then  been  fully 
accepted  in  the  public  mind.  It  is  doubtful  whether  Yocum  did  not 
suppose  it  was  really  lawful  to  return  a  slave  to  a  loyal  owner, 
though  it  is  certain  he  did  the  thing  secretly,  in  the  belief  that  his 
superiors  would  not  allow  it  if  known  to  them.  But  the  great  point 

*  See  Lincoln  to  Holt,  February  3  and  endorsement  February  1 6,  supra.  On 
March  24,  Attorney  General  Bates  wrote  Secretary  Seward: 

"I  am  directed  by  the  President  to  request  you  to  issue  a  -warrant  for  the 
pardon  of  William  Yocum,  with  the  following  recital. 

"  *Whereas  one  William  Yocum  was  convicted  by  a  General  Court  Martial 
sitting  in  Washington  D.C.  in  January  1864,  of  aiding  in  kidnapping  and  ab- 
stracting an  employee  of  the  United  States  from  the  military  service  .  .  .  and 
was  sentenced  to  confinement  at  hard  labor,  for  five  years,  in  the  Penitentiary 
at  Albany  N.Y. 

"  'And  whereas,  previous  to  his  said  conviction,  the  said  William  Yokum 
had  been  a  loyal  and  patriotic  citizen,  and  a  faithful  and  efficient  servant  of 
the  Government; 

"  *And  whereas  the  said  William  Yokum  is  an  aged  man,  and  has  a  large 
family  dependent  on  his  labor  for  support;  and  has  now  suffered  a  sufficient 
punishment  for  the  offence  committed; 

"  *And  whereas  Hon.  G.  Clay  Smith,  Hon.  Lucian  Anderson,  Hon.  Brutus 
J.  Clay,  Hon.  W.  H.  Randall,  Hon.   S.  L.  Casey  and  many  other  highly  re- 
spectable citizens  have  earnestly  petitioned  for  his  pardon; 
"'Now  therefore  &c:  &c:  &c:.  .  .  .  '  "    (DLC-RTL). 

Seward  forwarded  a  copy  to  Stanton  with  a  note  to  the  effect  that  the  requi- 
sition would  not  be  complied  with  "until  I  shall  learn  your  views  on  the  sub- 
ject." Stanton  endorsed:  "My  views  are  that  the  President  could  commit  no 
greater  mistake,  and  in  no  way  do  the  military  service,  his  own  administration, 
the  sense  of  public  justice  &  his  own  reputation  so  much  harm  as  by  granting 
this  pardon  and  in  the  name  of  the  Department,  and  on  behalf  of  the  colored 
people  to  whom  the  President  has  promised  protection  and  emancipation  I  re- 
spectfully protest  against  the  pardon  of  a  man  who  while  in  the  Military  serv- 
ice gave  a  colored  man  under  his  command  into  the  hands  of  a  slave  dealer  to 
be  sold  &  held  in  bondage.  His  crime  in  my  judgment  is  greater  than  that  of 
the  African  Slave  trader  and  his  pardon  will  in  my  opinion  injure  the  govern- 
ment in  the  eyes  of  all  civilized  nations  and  destroy  the  faith  of  the  colored 
man  in  the  government."  (Ibid.). 

[256] 


MARC  H      21,      1864 

with  me  is  that  the  severe  punishment  of  five  years  at  hard  labor 
in  the  Penitentiary  is  not  at  all  necessary  to  prevent  the  repetition 
of  the  crime  by  himself  or  by  others.  If  the  offence  was  one  of  fre- 
quent recurrence,  the  case  would  be  different;  but  this  case  of  Yo- 
cum  is  the  single  instance  which  has  come  to  my  knowledge.  I 
think  that  for  all  public  purposes,  and  for  all  proper  purposes,  he 
has  suffered  enough. 

The  case  of  Smithson  is  troublesome.5  His  wife  and  children  are 
quartered  mostly  on  our  friends,  and  exciting  a  great  deal  of  sym- 
pathy, which  will  soon  tell  against  us.  What  think  you  of  sending 
him  and  his  family  South,  holding  the  sentence  over  him  to  be 
re-inforced  if  he  returns  during  the  war. 

5  See  Lincoln's  endorsement  of  August  i,  1863,  supra.  William  T.  Smithson 
was  still  in  confinement  in  September,  1864. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  March  19,  1864. 

Please  find  a  Captain  amo[ng]  the  rebel  prisoners  in  your 
charge  and  exchange  of  for  Capt.  T.  Ten  Eyck,  of  i8th.  U.S.  In- 
fantry, now  a  prisoner  at  Richmond.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  12.  No  reply  has  been 
located.  See  Lincoln's  telegram  to  Butler,  April  23,  infra,  concerning  exchange 
of  Tenodor  Ten  Eyck  at  request  of  Senator  John  C.  Ten  Eyck  of  New  Jersey. 

Order  for  Discharge  of  George  B,  Ackerman1 

March  20,  1864 

If  George  B.  Ackerman,  now  a  prisoner  of  War  at  Camp  Douglas, 
Illinois,  shall  take  the  oath  of  December  8.  1863,  and  be  dis- 
charged, I  pledge  my  honor  he  will  keep  faith.  HENRY  WILSON 

Let  him  take  the  oath  and  be  discharged.  A.  LINCOLN 

March  20  1864 

1  AD  and  AES,  IHi.  The  document  is  in  Lincoln's  autograph,  excepting  Wil- 
son's signature. 

To  Montgomery  Blair1 

Post-Master-General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  March  21,  1864. 

These  young  ladies,  Miss  Dugger  and  Miss  Beattie,  are  from 
Illinois,  &  want  employment.  They  are  loyal  and  worthy,  and  I 

[257] 


MARCH      21,      1864 

shall  be  very  glad  indeed  if  places  can  be  found  for  them.  Yours 

A.  LINCOLN 


!ALS,  owned  by  Richard  F.  Lufkin,  Boston,  Massachusetts.  Miss  Susan 
Dugger  of  Carlinville,  Illinois,  was  given  a  job  in  the  Post  Office  Department 
and  later  transferred  to  the  Treasury  Department,  but  no  record  of  Miss 
Beattie's  employment  has  been  found. 

To  Clara  and  Julia  Brown1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington 
Misses  Clara  &  Julia  Brown  March  21   1864 

The  Afgan  you  sent  is  received,  and  gratefully  accepted.  I  es- 
pecially like  my  little  friends;  and  although  you  have  never  seen 
me,  I  am  glad  you  remember  me  for  the  country's  sake,  and  even 
more,  that  you  remember,  and  try  to  help,  the  poor  Soldiers.  Yours 
very  truly  A  LINCOLN 

1  Copy,  DLC-HW.  This  letter  is  misdated  March  2,  1864,  in  Tracy  (p.  238). 
The  copy  was  sent  to  Herndon  by  H.  C.  Brown,  Nyack  on  the  Hudson,  Feb- 
ruary 13,  1867:  "I  enclose  one  [letter]  reed  by  by  [szc]  nay  little  daughters 
(then  11  &  13  years  old  respectively).  .  .  ."  (Ibid.).  A  note  on  the  bottom  of 
the  copy  explains  that  a  photograph  of  Clara  and  Julia  was  sent  with  the 
afghan.  The  letter  from  Clara  and  Julia,  dated  at  Buffalo,  New  York,  March  9, 
1864,  is  as  follows: 

"Please  accept  this  Afghan  from  your  little  friends  who  desire  to  express 
their  regard.  .  .  .  The  afghan  -was  exhibited  at  the  'Central  Fair'  recently 
held  here,  and  now  we  are  very  happy  in  sending  it  to  our  Dear  President. 

"Please  remember  that  you  have  little  friends  in  Buffalo  who  pray  for  you, 
that  you  may  be  cheerful,  strong  and  wise."  (DLC-RTL). 

Endorsement  Concerning  George  W.  Lane1 

I  approve  the  object  of  the  within.          A.  LINCOLN. 
March  21,  1864. 

1  Naval  Records,  I,  X,  164.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on  a  letter  from  Ben- 
jamin F.  Butler,  March  19,  1864,  stating  that  George  W.  Lane  of  the  steam 
tug  Philadelphia  should  have  permission  to  trade  in  Chowan  County,  North 
Carolina. 

To  Henry  H.  Lockwood1 

March  21,   1864 

So  far  as  I  know,  the  placing  of  Maj.  Gen.  Wallace  in  command 
at  Baltimore,  was  not  in  consequence  of  any  objection  of  any  sort, 
to  Gen.  Lockwood.  This  much  said  in  writing,  I  verbally  explain 
a  little  further  to  Lt.  Col  Massey.  A. 

March  21.  1864 

[258] 


MARCH      21,      ±864 

1  AES,  NNP.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  -written  on  a  letter  from  Brigadier 
General  Henry  H.  Lockwood,  Headquarters,  Middle  Department,  Baltimore, 
Maryland,  March  ai,  1864: 

"When  I  had  the  honor  to  see  Your  excellency,  you  intimated  that  I  would 
not  be  removed  from  the  command  of  this  Dept.  except  for  cause.  An  order 
having  been  issued  for  my  removal,  I  infer  that  there  exists  some  cause.  My 
object  in  troubling  you  with  this  letter  is  to  know  if  this  cause  be  personal  mili- 
tary or  political.  If  the  latter  then  I  have  nothing  more  to  say,  as  being  no 
politician  I  cannot  pretend  to  comprehend  the  operations  of  the  political  world. 
But  if  the  cause  be  either  personal  or  military,  I  hold  my  reputation  too  dear 
not  to  seek,  very  respectfully  an  explanation,  and  set  the  honored  head  of  the 
state  right,  if  any  one  has  maligned  me.  This  letter  is  taken  by  my  confiden- 
tial officer  and  friend  Lt.  Col.  [George  V.]  Massey,  who  awaits  a  brief  inter- 
view with  you,  and  who  being  privy  to  all  my  doings  can  refute  any  erroneous 
impressions  you  may  have  reed,  respecting  me." 

AGO  General  Orders  No.  97,  March  12,  1864,  assigned  Major  General  Lewis 
Wallace  to  command  of  the  Middle  Department. 


Reply  to  New  York  Workingmen's  Democratic 
Republican  Association1 

Gentlemen  of  the  Committee.  March  21,  1864 

The  honorary  membership  in  your  Association,  as  generously 
tendered,  is  gratefully  accepted. 

You  comprehend,  as  your  address  shows,  that  the  existing  re- 
bellion, means  more,  and  tends  to  more,  than  the  perpetuation  of 
African  Slavery — that  it  is,  in  fact,  a  war  upon  the  rights  of  all 
working  people.  Partly  to  show  that  this  view  has  not  escaped  my 
attention,  and  partly  that  I  cannot  better  express  myself,  I  read 
a  passage  from  the  Message  to  Congress  in  December  1861: 

"It  continues  to  develop  that  the  insurrection  ******* 
*  *  *  till  all  of  liberty  shall  be  lost."2 

The  view's  then  expressed  remain  unchanged,  nor  have  I  much 
to  add.  None  are  so  deeply  interested  to  resist  the  present  rebellion 
as  the  working  people.  Let  them  beware  of  prejudice,  working  di- 
vision and  hostility  among  themselves.  The  most  notable  feature 
of  a  disturbance  in  your  city  last  summer,  was  the  hanging  of  some 
working  people  by  other  working  people.  It  should  never  be  so. 
The  strongest  bond  of  human  sympathy,  outside  of  the  family  re- 
lation, should  be  one  uniting  all  working  people,  of  all  nations, 
and  tongues,  and  kindreds.  Nor  should  this  lead  to  a  war  upon 
property,  or  the  owners  of  property.  Property  is  the  fruit  of  labor 

— property  is  desirable is  a  positive  good  in  the  world. 

That  some  should  be  rich,  shows  that  others  may  become  rich,  and 
hence  is  just  encouragement  to  industry  and  enterprize.  Let  not 
him  who  is  houseless  pull  down  the  house  of  another;  but  let  him 

[259] 


MARCH      21,      ±864 

labor  diligently  and  build  one  for  himself,  thus  by  example  assur- 
ing that  his  own  shall  be  safe  from  violence  when  built. 

1  D,  DLC-RTL.  This  manuscript,  not  in  Lincoln's  autograph,  is  probably  a 
copy  of  the  original  of  which  no  trace  has  been  discovered.  The  New  York 
Tribune -,  March  22,  1864,  reported  the  occasion  but  gave  an  incomplete  text  of 
Lincoln's  reply: 

"A  Committee  on  behalf  of  the  New- York  Workingmen's  Democratic  Repub- 
lican Association  today  waited  on  the  President  to  inform  him  that  their  asso- 
ciation had  elected  him  an  honorary  member.  The  object  of  the  organization 
is  to  advance  the  workingmen  of  America  in  morals,  position  and  loyalty;  it 
binds  them  together  in  support  of  the  Union,  and  induces  them  at  all  sacri- 
fices to  sustain  it.  They  requested  Mr.  Lincoln  to  give  his  views  on  the  sub- 
ject matter  of  which  their  address  treated." 

2  The  passage  indicated  by  ellipsis  in  the  document  may  be  found  in  volume 
v,  51-3- 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  March  21,1 864. 

If  there  is  on  file  a  request  of  Gen.  Meigs,  that  William  Alex- 
ander may  be  appointed  an  Assistant  Quarter-Master,  with  the 
rank  of  Captain,  let  him  be  appointed.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  No  record  has  been  found  of  William  Alexander's  appoint- 
ment. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  March  22.   1864. 

Hon.  W.  R.  Morrison,  says  he  has  requested  you  by  letter  to 
effect  a  special  exchange  of  Lt.  Col.  A.  F.  Rogers,  of  Both.  Ills. 
Vols.  now  in  Libby  Prison  and  I  shall  be  glad  if  you  can  effect  it. 

A  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  13.  General  Butler  re- 
plied on  the  same  day:  "I  had  supposed  that  I  had  effected  the  exchange  of 
Lieut  Col  [Andrew  F.]  Rogers  of  the  8oth.  Illinois,  but  when  the  prisoner  came 
down,  it  was  the  wrong  Col  Rogers.  However  I  will  try  again."  (DLC-Butler 
Papers). 


On  Slavery1 

I  never  knew  a  man  who  wished  to  be  himself  a  slave.  Consider 

if  you  know  any  good  thing,  that  no  man  desires   for  himself. 

March  22,  1864  A. 

[260] 


MARCH      23,      1864 

IADS,  CSmH.  As  first  printed  by  Tracy  (p.  239),  this  item  was  identified 
as  having  been  written  in  an  autograph  album  for  a  Sanitary  Fair.  It  is  no 
longer  in  an  album,  and  the  circumstances  of  its  composition  are  unknown. 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  March  22,  1864 

I  herewith  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action 
thereon,  a  treaty  made  and  concluded  in  Washington  City  on  the 
i8th  instant,  by  and  between  William  P  Dole,  commissioner  of 
Indian  Affairs,  and  the  Shawnee  Indians,  represented  by  their 
duly  authorized  delegates. 

A  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  and  a  communication 
of  the  Commissioner  of  Indian  Affairs  accompany  the  treaty. 

ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 
Executive  Office,  Washington,  March  22d,  1864. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  456.  The  treaty  and  accompanying  documents 
were  referred  to  the  committee  on  Indian  affairs  and  ordered  to  be  printed, 
but  on  May  4,  Senator  Samuel  C.  Pomeroy  presented  a  remonstrance  against 
the  treaty  from  the  Chilicothe  band  of  Shawnees.  No  further  action  seems  to 
have  been  taken. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If  services  needed  let  him  be  appointed.          A.  LINCOLN 
March  22.  1864 

1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Colonel  Lewis 
A.  Grant,  commanding  the  Second  Brigade,  Second  Division,  Sixth  Corps,  to 
Stanton,  March  12,  1864,  asking  that  First  Lieutenant  John  W.  Clark,  quarter- 
master of  the  Sixth  Vermont  Volunteers,  be  appointed  captain.  Clark's  ap- 
pointment was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  April  7,  1864. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  General  Meade  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington,  March  23,  1864. 

Please  suspend  execution  of  Alanson  Orton,  under  sentence  for 
desertion,  until  further  order  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  R.  E.  Burdick,  New  York  City.  No  reply  has  been  found. 
See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  March  24,  infra.  General  Court  Martial  Orders  No.  6, 
March  4,  1864,  ordered  execution  of  "Allison  Ortan,"  First  Battalion,  Twelfth 
Infantry,  on  March  25. 

[261] 


To  Robert  C.  Schenck1 

March  23,  1864 

After  the  company  left  last  evening,  Mrs.  L.  made  known  to  me 
a  little  matter  which  has  annoyed  me  ever  since  ...  I  beg  to  as- 
sure you  that  a  programme  was  brought  to  me,  exactly  as  I  carried 
it  out;  and  that  I  had  not  the  slightest  suspicion  of  a  mistake.  I 
am  aware  this  is  no  great  matter,  not  going  beyond  a  little  tem- 
porary embarrassment  to  any  but  myself;  still  I  feel  that  this  ex- 
planation is  due  all  round,  which  I  am  sure  you  will  believe  is 
the  truth,  and  nothing  but  the  truth. 

1  Emily  Driscoll  Catalog  12,  April,  1951,  No.  126.  The  source  describes  this 
incomplete  text  as  being  from  an  autograph  letter  signed.  Representative 
Schenck,  chairman  of  the  committee  on  military  affairs,  answered  on  the 
same  day:  "I  am  very  sorry  that  you  have  felt  annoyed  in  any  way,  or  for 
a  moment,  by  the  little  matter  of  last  evening.  I  did  not  for  an  instant  sup- 
pose that  it  was  any  thing  but  accidental,  &  without  design,  that  Mrs.  Lin- 
coln's arrangement  was  not  carried  out;  I  should  not  have  given  it  another 
thought,  but  for  your  note  which  I  have  just  received.  I  pray  you  not  to  think 
of  it  again.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Carl  Schurz1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington, 
Major  General  Schurz.  March  23.  1864 

My  dear  Sir:  The  letter,  of  which  the  above  is  a  copy,  was  sent 
to  you,  before  Mr.  Willmann  saw  me;  and  now  yours  of  the  igth. 
tells  me  you  did  not  receive  it. 

I  do  not  wish  to  be  more  specific  about  the  difficulty  of  your 
coming  to  Washington.  I  think  you  can  easily  conjecture  it.  I  per- 
ceive no  objection  to  your  making  a  political  speech  when  you  are 
where  one  is  to  be  made;  but  quite  surely  speaking  in  the  North, 
and  fighting  in  the  South,  at  the  same  time,  are  not  possible.  Nor 
could  I  be  justified  to  detail  any  officer  to  the  political  campaign 
during  it's  continuance,  and  then  return  him  to  the  Army 

1  ADf,  DLC-RTL.  See  Lincoln  to  Schurz,  March  13,  supra,  a  signed  copy  of 
which  precedes  this  letter  in  the  manuscript  draft.  On  March  19  Schurz  wrote 
Lincoln  from  New  York: 

"Mr.  [Andreas]  Willmann  of  this  city,  who  delivered  my  last  letter  .  .  . 
was  informed  .  .  .  that  you  had  written  to  me  in  reply,  but  as  I  have  received 
no  letter  whatever  from  you,  there  must  be  some  mistake.  .  .  .  From  what 
Mr.  Willmann  told  me  of  his  conversation  with  you  I  am  led  to  believe  that 
you  consider  my  taking  part  in  the  electoral  contest  this  summer  as  attended 
with  some  difficulty  in  asmuch  as  it  would  not  be  an  easy  thing  to  find  a 
proper  command  and  position  for  me  afterwards.  This  as  well  as  your  silence 
upon  my  letters  I  can  explain  upon  no  other  supposition  than  that  you  have 
entirely  hindered  my  intentions. 

"Under  present  circumstances  I  do  not  want  to  appear  to  feel  bound  by  any 

[262] 


MARCH      23,      1864 

favor  from  anybody.  If  I  can  take  an  active  part  in  the  political  contest  con- 
sistently, with  my  position  in  the  army,  I  shall  be  glad  .  .  .  expecting  noth- 
ing for  myself  but  to  resume  my  old  position  .  .  .  after  the  election.  If  a  po- 
litical activity  be  deemed  inconsistent  with  my  military  position,  I  shall  then 
have  to  make  my  choice.  ...  I  wish  to  assure  you  here  emphatically,  that 
in  neither  case  I  would  make  any  demands  on  the  administration.  .  ,  . 

"About  this  and  several  other  matters  of  a  political  nature.  I  desired  to  have 
a  conversation  with  you.  At  a  time  like  this  I  would  not  consider  it  out  of  place 
to  volunteering  advice  and  opinion  about  a  few  points  of  some  importance.  .  .  . 
It  is  somewhat  difficult  for  me  to  understand  why  I  do  not  receive  this  per- 
mission in  reply  to  my  letter. 

".  .  .  .  For  your  information  I  send  you  a  copy  of  my  argument  before  the 
Court  of  Inquiry  which  I  had  printed  for  my  own  private  use.  ...  I  would 
be  completely  satisfied  with  the  command  of  a  respectable  division  in  some 
other  Dept.,  Gen.  Sigel's  for  instance,  .  .  .  and  that,  in  case  the  nth  Corps  is 
taken  from  under  Gen.  Hooker,  I  shall  be  quite  content  with  the  command  I 
now  have.  .  .  . 

"I  am  quite  sick,  suffering  from  all  sorts  of  complaints  common  in  camps. 
I  expect  however  to  be  able  in  a  few  days  to  return  to  the  Army.  Until  then 
I  should  be  glad  to  know  what  I  shall  have  to  do,  and  on  my  way  there  to 
visit  Washington,  unless  my  presence  there  be  particularly  undesirable." 
(DLC-RTL). 

On  March  21  Schurz  wrote  again: 

"At  last  I  have  received  your  letter  of  the  13th;  it  was  not  directed  to  my 
hotel  and  I  did,  therefore,  not  hear  of  it  until  it  was  advertised  in  the  papers. 

"My  letters  to  you  were  dictated  by  the  ardent  desire  to  see  the  unity  of  the 
party  unimpaired  at  the  next  presidential  election,  for  without  that  unity 
the  prospective  result  seems  to  me  extremely  doubtful.  ...  I  thought  that  my 
opinion  and  advice  upon  several  points  of  importance  might  be  entitled  to  some 
consideration  .  .  .  for  there  are  things  which  it  is  better  to  discuss  in  private 
than  in  public.  In  believing  that  a  full  exchange  of  views  might  be  desirable 
not  only  to  me  but  also  to  you,  it  seems  I  was  mistaken.  While  a  number  of 
generals  were  permitted  to  visit  Washington,  it  is  difficult  for  me  to  under- 
stand, how  my  presence  there  could  be  attended  with  unpleasant  difficulties  or 
even  be  detrimental  to  the  public  service.  I  might  perhaps  claim  a  right  to 
know,  what  particular  unpleasant  difficulty  or  what  detriment  to  the  service 
is  meant,  but  I  apprehend  I  have  to  submit  not  only  to  an  incomprehensible 
refusal  but  also  to  a  mysterious  hint  as  to  the  cause  of  that  refusal.  I  ap- 
proached you  with  the  feelings  of  a  friend,  not  to  ask  for  something  but  to 
offer  something  and  I  find  myself  turned  off  very  much  like  an  enemy  or  a 
suspicious  character.  I  must  confess,  I  cannot  understand  this.  ...  I  did  not 
think  it  would  be  as  difficult  with  your  assistance  to  procure  me  an  opportunity 
to  take  an  active  part  in  the  political  contest  some  time  in  July  or  August  and 
September;  and  if  you  think  it  is,  I  shall  then  have  to  decide  the  question  of 
my  remaining  in  the  army  for  myself  when  the  time  comes. 

"While  I  regret  most  sincerely  that  you  deemed  best  to  cut  off  a  full  ex- 
change of  views,  I  beg  you  not  to  construe  this  letter  as  a  renewed  application 
for  permission  to  visit  Washington.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

March  23,  1864 

I  would  like  to  oblige  Gov.  Newell  with  a  note  like  the  within,  un- 
less the  Sec.  of  War  perceives  objection.  Will  he  please  answer? 
March  23.  1864.  A.  LIN-COLT* 

[263] 


MARCH      24,      ±864 

The  Long-Branch  and  Sea-Shore  Railroad  Company  is  hereby  au- 
thorized to  make  and  use  a  railroad  track  on  the  land  of  the  United 
States,  conforming  to  the  curve  dotted  line  on  this  map,  which  line 
commences  at  the  figure  8,  and  runs  Southward  nearly  touching 
the  right  hand  ends  of  these  written  lines,  and  on  till  it  passes  off 
the  government  lands,  upon  condition  that  said  railroad  track  and 
all  possession  of  the  ground  shall  be  removed  and  surrendered  by 
force  if  necessary,  upon  either  the  order  of  the  President  of  the 
United  States,  or  a  Joint  Resolution  of  Congress  so  requiring. 

1 AES  and  AD,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  separated  from  the 
memorandum  as  cataloged  in  the  Lincoln  Papers,  but  they  seem  obviously  to 
belong  together.  A  note  from  Governor  William  A.  Newell,  dated  March  23 
(but  incorrectly  cataloged  as  "March  25")  is  as  follows:  "If  your  Excellency 
shall  determine  to  sign  the  paper  which  I  left  with  you  on  yesterday  I  will  be 
greatly  obliged  if  it  can  be  sent  to  me  at  Allentown  N.  Jersey;  I  do  hope  that 
the  favor  sought  will  not  be  refused.  The  land  is  valueless,  and  on  the  ex- 
pression of  a  wish  to  that  effect  the  whole  works  will  be  removed,  or  relin- 
quished, without  compensation,  to  the  Government.  It  will  contribute  vastly 
to  the  welfare  of  that  portion  of  the  County  in  which  I  live,  New  Jersey  has 
always  responded  to  the  calls  of  your  Excellency  &  I  beg  to  express  the  hope 
that  this  small  request  of  some  of  her  citizens  will  be  allowed.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 

The  document  which  Governor  Newell  submitted,  written  on  Executive 
Mansion  stationery,  reads  as  follows: 

"Permission  is  hereby  given  to  the  Long  Branch  and  Sea-Shore  Rail  Road 
Company  to  use  so  much  of  the  government  property  at  Sandy  Hook,  begin- 
ning at  the  Horse  Shoe  and  extending  southward,  as  may  be  necessary  for  the 
construction  of  suitable  dock,  depot  and  track  accommodations,  with  the  un- 
derstanding that  the  improvements  thus  designated  shall  be  removed  or  trans- 
fered  to  the  Government  whenever  it  shall  be  required" 

Secretary  Stanton  referred  the  matter  to  General  Halleck  and  Halleck  re- 
ferred to  Judge  Advocate  General  Holt,  who  reported  on  March  26:  "This,  like 
other  property  belonging  to  the  government,  having  been  acquired  by  public 
law,  can  only  be  disposed  of  under  the  same  sanctions.  I  am  aware  of  no 
principle  or  precedent  which  can  be  held  to  authorise  the  executive,  to  transfer 
either  the  absolute  title  to  or  a  usufructuary,  interest  in  property,  of  the  U. 
States,  thus  acquired,  without  the  express  concurrence  of  Congress.  The  rule 
is  believed  to  be  the  same,  without  reference  to  the  amount  of  interest  sought  to 
be  conveyed.  In  this  particular  case,  the  privilege  of  using  the  land  described 
for  the  purpose  mentioned,  would  probably  prove  one  of  great  pecuniary  value, 
to  the  Rail  Road  company,  but  whether  of  great  or  little  value,  in  its  transfer 
or  bestowal,  the  government  must  act  through  a  public  law,  and  not  through 
the  will  of  any  one  of  its  Departments."  (Ibid.). 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney   General  please   send  me   a   nomination    as   within   re- 
quested. A.  LINCOLN 
March  24.   1864 

1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  Edward  B.  Tay- 
lor, March  24,  1864,  register  of  the  Land  Office  at  Omaha,  Nebraska  Territory, 
recommending  Daniel  Gantt  of  Omaha  for  U.S.  District  Attorney.  Gantt's  ap- 
pointment was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  May  10,  1864. 

[264] 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  Gen.  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington,  March  24,  1864. 

Please,  if  you  can,  effect  special  exchanges,  for  J.  F.  Robinson, 
ist.  Lieut.  Co.  E,  67,  P.V.  and  C.  L.  Edmunds,  ist.  Lieut.  Co.  D, 
67,  P.V.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  15.  The  roster  of  the 
Sixty-seventh  Pennsylvania  Regiment  lists  these  men  as  James  T  Robinson, 
discharged  on  March  24,  1865,  and  Charles  L.  Edmonds,  mustered  out  on  De- 
cember 18,  1864. 

To  James  R.  Doolittle1 

Hon.  J.  R.  Doolittle,  please  call  and  see  me  this  morning. 

March  24,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS-P,  ISLA. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Judge  Advocate  General  March  24,  1864. 

Please  examine  and  report  upon  the  case  of  Capt.  John  Hopper, 
Co.  D.  2 ist.  Regt.  Invalid  Corps,  said  to  have  been  summarily  dis- 
missed. Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DLC-RTL.  Holt  returned  this  letter  with  the  following  endorsement 
dated  March  25,  1864.:  "Respectfully  returned  to  the  President.  This  case  has 
been  heretofore  fully  examined,  &  reports  upon  it  made  to  the  President  under 
dates  of  nth.  &  a 8th.  of  present  month.  Reference  is  had  to  these  reports  as 
expressing  the  views  of  this  office,  on  the  application  for  the  restoration  of 
Capt.  Hopper  to  the  service."  No  further  record  has  been  found  of  Lincoln's 
action  in  the  case. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major-General  Meade,  Army  of  Potomac:  March  24,  1864. 

Do  not  change  your  purpose  to  send  Private  Orton,  of  Twelfth 
U.S.  Infantry,  to  the  Dry  Tortugas.  A.  LINCOLN. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  421.  See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  March  23,  supra. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  March  24,  1864 

In  reply  to  the  Resolution  of  the  Senate  of  the  ±5th.  instant  in 
relation  to  the  establishment  of  monarchical  governments  in  Cen- 

[265] 


MARCH      24,      ±864 

tral  and  South  America,  I  transmit  a  report  from  the  Secretary 
of  State,  to  whom  the  subject  was  referred. 

Washington  24  March  1864.  ABRAHAM  LIISTCOLN 

IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  sSA  F$.  Seward  reported  on  March  24,  1864, 
that  "surmises  and  jealousies  are  constantly  arising  on  the  subject  to  which 
the  resolution  refers.  .  .  .  But  there  is  no  correspondence  or  ...  information 
which  furnishes  any  reliable  facts  showing  the  existence  of  'plans'  for  the 
accomplishment  of  the  object  mentioned." 

To  John  E  Usher1 

March  24,  1864 

If.  there  is  such  an  office,  vacant,  and  ready  to  be  filled,  as  in- 
dicated, the  Sec.  of  the  Interior  will  please  send  me  a  nomination, 
according  to  the  within.  A.  LIISTCOLIST 

March.  24.  1864 

1  AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Marcus 
Boyd  of  Missouri,  asking  appointment  as  surveyor  general  of  government  and 
Indian  lands  in  Utah  Territory.  An  unsigned  endorsement  in  reply  from  the 
Department  of  Interior  called  the  president's  attention  to  the  fact  that  there 
was  no  vacancy. 

To  Benjamin  B.  French1 

Private  Executive  Mansion, 

Hon.  B.  B.  French  Washington, 

My  dear  Sir:  March  25,  1864. 

I  understand  a  Bill  is  before  Congress,  by  your  instigation,  for 
taking  your  office  from  the  control  of  the  Department  of  the  In- 
terior, and  considerably  enlarging  the  powers  and  patronage  of 
your  office.  The  proposed  change  may  be  right  for  aught  I  know; 
and  it  certainly  is  right  for  Congress  to  do  as  it  thinks  proper  in 
the  case.  What  I  wish  to  say  is  that  if  the  change  is  made,  I  do  not 
think  I  can  allow  you  to  retain  the  office;  because  that  would  be 
encouraging  officers  to  be  constantly  intriguing,  to  the  detriment 
of  the  public  interest,  in  order  to  profit  themselves.  Yours  truly 

A. 


iADfS,  DLC-RTL.  This  letter  is  printed  by  Hertz  (II,  946),  without  date 
or  addressee.  The  bill  (8.43)  did  not  pass.  Commissioner  French  replied  on 
March  27,  1864: 

"Your  note  of  the  25th  is  reed,  and  I  am  greatly  surprised  at  the  contents 
.  .  .  because  I  have  been  guilty  of  no  intended  impropriety,  and  of  no  wrong.  I 
have  been  cruelly  treated  by  your  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  and  have  been 
forced  by  him,  to  defend  myself,  and,  because  I  have  done  so,  you  have  been 
appealed  to  to  crush  me.  I  do  not  believe  you  will  do  so  when  you  know  all 
the  facts.  ... 

[266] 


MARCH      25,      1864 

"The  Secretary  of  the  Interior,  when  that  excellent  man,  Caleb  B.  Smith  was 
Secretary,  was  charged  by  Congress,  with  the  supervision  and  control  of  the 
erection  of  the  Capitol  Extension  and  New  Dome.  He  saw  fit,  of  his  own  ac- 
cord, to  confer  upon  me  the  honor  and  trust  of  Disbursing  Agent.  I  have 
bonds  in  the  penalty  of  $40,000,  and  entered  upon  the  duty,  and  performed  it, 
I  believe,  satisfactorily  to  Mr.  Smith.  He  resigned,  Mr.  Usher  was  appointed 
.  .  .  removed  my  Clerk,  who  was  charged  with  keeping  my  accounts,  and  for 
whose  acts,  I,  alone,  was  responsible  under  my  bonds,  and  placed  another  man 
in  his  stead.  .  .  .  On  the  3Oth  of  June,  1863,  .  .  .  removing  me  from  the  place 
of  disbursing  agent,  .  .  .  appointed  the  clerk  he  had  sent  .  .  .  with  enlarged 
powers,  and  a  salary  of  $2500  per  annum.  At  this  I  felt  grieved  .  .  .  and  ad- 
dressed to  the  Secretary,  a  letter  ,  .  .  also  ...  to  you.  .  .  . 

"Naturally,  I  wrote  to  Senator  Foot,  informing  him  of  the  fact.  .  .  .  He 
replied  .  .  .  that  as  soon  as  Congress  met  it  was  his  intention  to  introduce  a 
bill  placing  the  work  on  the  Extension  &  Dome  under  the  Commissioner  of 
Public  Buildings,  where  it  belonged,  &  removing  the  office  of  Commissioner 
from  any  control  of  the  Secy.  I  drew  up  a  bill  which  I  supposed  would  carry- 
out  what  Senator  Foot  said,  and  sent  it  to  him,  keeping  a  copy  of  it.  Some  time 
afterwards  a  friend,  to  whom  I  showed  the  copy,  -wanted  a  few  copies  of  it 
for  his  own  use,  and,  without  the  least  idea  of  there  being  any  impropriety  in 
my  doing  so,  having  a  printing  press  and  type  in  my  office,  I  printed  for  him 
a  few  copies. 

"I  had  no  agency  whatever  in  the  introduction  of  the  bill  by  Senator  Foot,  as 
he  never  mentioned  it  to  me,  that  I  remember,  after  he  came  to  Washington, 
before  its  introduction.  I  never  spoke  to  a  Senator  or  Representative  concerning 
it,  unless  spoken  to.  I  had  not  the  least  agency  in  its  introduction  into  the 
House.  .  .  .  After  it  was  .  .  .  referred  to  the  Committee  on  Public  Buildings 
and  Grounds,  I  was  notified  by  the  Chairman  ...  to  appear  before  it  on  a  cer- 
tain day,  which  I  did,  and  there  met  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior.  He  was 
heard  fully,  and  said  something  to  which  I  was  forced  to  reply,  and,  at  a 
subsequent  meeting,  I  did  reply.  This  is  all  my  personal  action  in  the  mat- 
ter. ...  I  have  never  spoken  to  a  member  of  the  Senate  Committee,  except 
Senator  Foot,  on  the  subject  of  it.  He  submitted  to  me,  unasked,  some  papers 
sent  him  by  the  Secy,  for  my  answer,  and  I  gave  it.  ...  I  have  done,  Mr. 
President,  exactly  what  you  would  have  done  in  my  case,  and  nothing  more, 
except,  perhaps,  in  the  printing  of  about  a  dozen  copies  of  the  bill.  .  .  . 

"As  I  did  not  seek  the  passage  of  the  bill  in  question,  I  cannot  .  .  .  seek  to 
stop  it;  but  I  beg  of  you  not  to  sacrifice  me  without  granting  me  a  personal 
interview. 

"I  have  submitted  your  letter  to  Senator  Foot  who  expressed  much  surprise 
at  its  contents  .  .  .  evidently  written  .  .  .  under  a  false  impression  as  to  the 
facts,  and  that  he  would  call  upon  you  tomorrow  and  assure  you  that,  so  far  as 
he  was  concerned,  I  had  no  agency  whatever  in  the  introduction  of  the  bill, 
except  that  I  drew  it  up  for  him,  a  thing  that  is  done  daily  by  officials  about 
the  Capital,  at  the  request  of  members."  (DLC-RTL)". 

To  James  H.  Lane1 

March  25,  1864 

I  have  endorsed,  as  you  see,  your  application  for  Henry  W. 
Fick  to  be  an  Assistant  Pay-Master  in  the  Navy.  I  return  it  to 
you  to  say  that,  by  law,  he  cannot  be  appointed.  .  .  . 

1  American  Art  Association  Anderson  Galleries  Catalog  3850,  May  12-13, 
1930,  No.  198.  According  to  the  catalog  description,  this  partial  text  is  from 
an  autograph  letter  signed. 

[267] 


To  Thurlow  Weed1 

Hon.  Thurlow  Weed  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  25.  1864. 

I  have  been  both  pained  and  surprised  recently  at  learning  that 
you  are  wounded  because  a  suggestion  of  yours  as  to  the  mode  of 
conducting  our  national  difficulty,  has  not  been  followed  —  pained, 
because  I  very  much  wish  you  to  have  no  unpleasant  feeling  pro- 
ceeding from  me,  and  surprised,  because  my  impression  is  that  I 
have  seen  you,  since  the  last  Message  issued,  apparantly  feeling 
very  cheerful  and  happy.  How  is  this?  Yours  truly 

A 


1ALS,  NRU  (on  deposit);  LS  copy,  DLC-RTL.  On  March  30,  1864,  John 
G.  Nicolay  wrote  Lincoln  from  the  Astor  House,  New  York: 

"Mr.  Weed  was  here  at  the  Astor  House  on  my  arrival  last  Saturday  morn- 
ing and  I  gave  him  the  note  you  sent  him. 

"He  read  it  over,  carefully  once  or  twice  and  then  said  he  didn't  quite 
understand  it.  He  had  written  a  letter  to  Judge  Davis,  which  the  Judge 
had  probably  shown  you,  but  in  that  he  had  said  nothing  except  about  Cus- 
tom House  matters. 

"He  said  that  all  the  solicitude  he  had  was  in  your  behalf.  You  had  told 
him  in  January  last  that  you  thought  you  would  make  a  change  in  the  Col- 
lectorship  here,  but  that  thus  far  it  had  not  been  done.  He  had  told  you  he 
himself  had  no  personal  preference  as  to  the  particular  man  who  is  to  be 
his  successor.  He  did  not  think  Mr.  Barney  a  bad  man  but  thought  him  a 
weak  one.  His  four  deputies  are  constantly  intriguing  against  you.  Andrews 
is  doing  the  same.  Changes  are  constantly  being  made  among  the  subordinates 
in  the  Custom  House,  and  men  turned  out,  for  no  other  real  reason  than  that 
they  take  active  part  in  primary  meetings  &c.,  in  behalf  of  your  re-nomina- 
tion. 

"His  only  solicitude,  he  said,  was  for  yourself.  He  thought  that  if  you  were 
not  strong  enough  to  hold  the  Union  men  together  through  the  next  Presi- 
dential election,  when  it  must  necessarily  undergo  a  great  strain,  the  country 
was  in  the  utmost  danger  of  going  to  ruin. 

"His  desire  was  to  strengthen  you  as  much  as  possible  and  that  you  should 
strengthen  yourself.  You  were  being  weakened  by  the  impression  in  the  popu- 
lar mind  that  you  hold  on  with  such  tenacity  to  men  once  in  office,  although 
they  prove  to  be  incapable  and  unworthy.  This  feeling  among  your  friends 
also  raises  the  question,  as  to  whether,  if  re-elected,  you  would  change  your 
Cabinet.  The  present  Cabinet  is  notoriously  weak  and  inharmonious  —  no 
Cabinet  at  all  —  gives  the  President  no  support.  Welles  is  a  cypher,  Bates  a 
fogy,  and  Blair  at  best  a  dangerous  friend. 

"Something  was  needed  to  reassure  the  public  mind  and  to  strengthen  your- 
self. Chase  and  Fremont,  while  they  might  not  succeed  in  making  themselves 
successful  rivals  might  yet  form  and  lead  dangerous  factions.  Chase  was  not 
formidable  as  a  candidate  in  the  field,  but  by  the  shrewd  dodge  of  a  with- 
drawal is  likely  to  turn  up  again  with  more  strength  than  ever. 

"He  had  received  a  letter  from  Judge  Davis,  in  which  the  Judge  wrote  him 
that  he  had  read  his  (Weed's)  letter  to  you,  but  that  you  did  not  seem  ready 
to  act  in  the  appointment  of  a  new  Collector,  and  that  he  (the  Judge)  thought 
it  was  because  of  your  apprehension  that  you  would  be  merely  getting  'out 
of  one  muss  into  another.' 

[268] 


MARCH      26,      1864 

"A  change  in  the  Custom  House  was  imperatively  needed  because  one 
whole  bureau  in  it  had  been  engaged  in  treasonably  aiding  the  rebellion. 

"The  ambition  of  his  life  had  been,  not  to  get  office  for  himself,  but  to  assist 
in  putting  good  men  in  the  right  places.  If  he  was  good  for  anything,  it  was 
as  an  outsider  to  give  valuable  suggestions  to  an  administration  that  would 
give  him  its  confidence.  He  feared  he  did  not  have  your  entire  confidence — 
that  you  only  regarded  him  with  a  certain  degree  of  leniency;  that  you  only 
regarded  him  as  being  not  quite  so  great  a  rascal  as  his  enemies  charged  him 
with  being. 

"The  above  are  substantially  the  points  of  quite  a  long  conversation.  This 
morning  I  had  another  interview  with  Mr.  Weed. 

"He  had  just  received  Gov.  Morgan's  letter  informing  him  of  the  nomination 
of  Hogeboom  to  fill  McElrath's  place,  and  seemed  quite  disheartened  and  dis- 
appointed. He  said  he  did  not  know  what  to  say.  He  had  assured  your  friends 
here  that  when  in  your  own  good  time  you  became  ready  to  make  changes, 
the  new  appointments  would  be  from  among  your  friends;  but  that  this  pro- 
motion of  one  of  your  most  active  and  malignant  enemies  left  him  quite  pow- 
erless. He  had  not  yet  told  any  one,  but  knew  it  would  be  received  with  gen- 
eral indignation,  &c  &c. 

"I  shall  remain  here  a  day  or  two  longer.**   (DLC-Nicolay  Papers). 


Proclamation  About  Amnesty1 

March  26,  1864 
By  the  President  of  the  United  States  of  America: 

A  Proclamation. 

Whereas,  it  has  become  necessary  to  define  the  cases  in  which 
insurgent  enemies  are  entitled  to  the  benefits  of  the  proclamation 
of  the  President  of  the  United  States,  which  was  made  on  the 
eighth  day  of  December,  1863,  and  the  manner  in  which  they  shall 
proceed  to  avail  themselves  of  those  benefits: 

And  whereas,  the  objects  of  that  proclamation  were  to  suppress 
the  insurrection  and  to  restore  the  authority  of  the  United  States, 
and  whereas  the  amnesty  therein  proposed  by  the  President  was 
offered  with  reference  to  these  objects  alone: 

Now,  therefore,  I,  Abraham  Lincoln,  President  of  the  United 
States,  do  hereby  proclaim  and  declare  that  the  said  proclamation 
does  not  apply  to  the  cases  of  persons  who,  at  the  time  when  they 
seek  to  obtain  the  benefits  thereof  by  taking  the  oath  thereby  pre- 
scribed are  in  military,  naval  or  civil  confinement  or  custody,  or 
under  bonds  or  on  parole  of  the  civil,  military  or  naval  authorities 
or  agents  of  the  United  States  as  prisoners  of  war  or  persons  de- 
tained for  offences  of  any  kind,  either  before  or  after  conviction, 
and  that,  on  the  contrary,  it  does  apply  only  to  those  persons  who 
being  yet  at  large  and  free  from  any  arrest,  confinement  or  duress, 
shall  voluntarily  come  forward  and  take  the  said  oath  with  the 

[269] 


MARCH      28,      1864 

purpose  of  restoring  peace  and  establishing  the  national  authority. 
Prisoners  excluded  from  the  amnesty  offered  in  the  said  procla- 
mation may  apply  to  the  President  for  clemency  like  all  other 
offenders,  and  their  applications  will  receive  due  consideration. 

I  do  farther  declare  and  proclaim  that  the  oath  prescribed  in 
the  aforesaid  proclamation  of  the  8th.  of  December,  1863,  may  be 
taken  and  subscribed  before  any  commissioned  officer,  civil,  mili- 
tary or  naval,  in  the  service  of  the  United  States,  or  any  civil  or 
military  officer  of  a  State  or  Territory  not  in  insurrection,  who,  by 
the  laws  thereof,  may  be  qualified  for  administering  oaths.  All  of- 
ficers who  receive  such  oaths  are  hereby  authorized  to  give  certif- 
icates thereon  to  the  persons  respectively  by  whom  they  are  made. 
And  such  officers  are  hereby  required  to  transmit  the  original  rec- 
ords of  such  oaths  at  as  early  a  day  as  may  be  convenient  to  the 
Department  of  State,  where  they  will  be  deposited  and  remain  in 
the  archives  of  the  Government.  The  Secretary  of  State  will  keep  a 
register  thereof,  and  will  on  application,  in  proper  cases,  issue  cer- 
tificates of  such  records  in  the  customary  form  of  official  certifi- 
cates. 

In  testimony  whereof,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  caused 
the  seal  of  the  United  States  to  be  affixed. 

Done  at  the  city  of  Washington,  the  twenty-sixth  day  of  March, 
in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and 
[L.S.]  sixty-four,  and  of  the  Independence  of  the  United  States 

the  eighty-eighth.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

By  the  President: 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD  Secretary  of  State. 

!DS,  DNA  FS  RG  11,  Proclamations. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

March  28,  1864 

Will  the  Attorney  General  please  give  me  his  opinion  whether  this 
law  relieves  the  Marshal  of  the  District  from  the  duty  of  execut- 
ing the  death  sentence  upon  persons  under  that  sentence  in  the 
District  jail?  A.  LINCOLN 

March  28.  1864 

!AES,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  S.  86,  "A  Bill  to  authorize  the 
appointment  of  a  warden  of  the  jail  in  the  District  of  Columbia,"  approved 
February  29,  1864.  Bates'  autograph  opinion  of  March  28  is  as  follows: 

_  'A  somewhat  troublesome   question   arises   under  this    bill    which    requires 
either  the  interpretation  of  the  Court  or  the  action  of  the  Executive. 

[270] 


MARCH      28,      1864 

"The  President  has  nominated  a  Warden  of  the  Jail,  but  he  has  not  been 
confirmed  by  the  Senate. 

"The  Warden  of  the  Penitentiary  became  functus  officio,  and  has  neither 
done  service  nor  received  emolument  for  more  than  two  years. 

"There  is  no  Warden  of  the  jail  qualified  by  law;  there  is  no  Warden  of 
the  Penitentiary  recognized  by  the  Executive,  or  accounting  officers  of  the 
treasury  and  no  penitentiary  in  the  District  of  which  he  could  be  Warden. 

"To  remove  all  doubt  I  suggest  that  an  order  from  the  President  be  issued 
reciting  the  fact  of  the  removal  of  the  Penitentiary,  the  vacation  of  the  office 
of  Warden  of  the  penitentiary,  and  in  order  to  remove  all  doubt  that  he  be 
now  removed  to  relate  back  to  the  time  of  the  last  payment  of  his  salary." 
(Ibid.). 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  March  28.  1864. 

I  am  told  there  is  a  man  in  the  Old  Capitol  Prison  by  the  name 
of  Benedict  A.  King,  on  some  charge  of  desertion.  He  belongs,  it 
is  said,  to  the  153rd.  N.  Y.  Vols.2  He  wishes  to  be  sent  to  his  Regi- 
ment. Report  me  the  facts  of  his  case  if  you  can.  Yours  truly 

A.  LnsrcoLisr    . 

1  ALS,  Herman  Blum,  Blumhaven  Library,  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania.  Pri- 
vate Benedict  A.  King,  First  Maine  Battery,  was  sentenced  February  10,  1864, 
to  death  for  desertion.  General  Christopher  C.  Augur  recommended  commu- 
tation to   dishonorable   discharge   and  five   years'   imprisonment.   The  records 
show  that  Lincoln  returned  the  papers  in  the  case  on  April   16,   1864,  without 
further  action  (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  773). 

2  He  had  deserted  and  re-enlisted. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  28,  1864. 

The  letter  of  Mr.  Tho.  H.  Burrowes,  written  in  behalf  of  the 
Common  School  Teachers  of  Pennsylvania,  and  which  you  left 
with  me  as  a  mode  of  giving  me  the  notice  therein  requested,  is 
herewith  returned  to  you.  Please  present  to  the  writer,  and  to  those 
he  represents,  my  grateful  thanks  for  this  evidence  of  their  patriot- 
ic devotion,  and  this  contribution  to  the  great  loyal  public  senti- 
ment of  the  country,  which  is,  indeed,  the  foundation  of  all  else 
that  is  valuable  in  this  great  national  trial.  The  gun  tendered  you 
will  please  accept  and  dispose  of  in  such  way  as  you  may  deem 
proper.  Yours  truly,  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Copy,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  175.  No 
further  reference  has  been  found. 

[271] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  28  1864. 

The  Governor  of  Kentucky  is  here,  and  desires  to  have  the  fol- 
lowing points  definitely  fixed: 

1.  That  the  quotas  of  troops  furnished,  and  to  be  furnished  by 
Kentucky,  may  be  adjusted  upon  the  basis  as  actually  reduced  by 
able  bodied  men  of  hers  having  gone  into  the  rebel  service;  and 
that  she  be  required  to  furnish  no  more  than  her  just  quotas  upon 
fair  adjustment  on  such  basis. 

2.  That  to  whatever  extent  the  enlistment,  and  drafting,  one  or 
both,  of  colored  troops  may  be  found  necessary  within  the  State, 
it  may  be  conducted  within  the  law  of  Congress;  and,  as  far  as 
practicable,   free   from   colateral   embarrasments,    disorders,    and 
provocations. 

I  think  these  requests  of  the  Governor  are  reasonable;  and  I 
shall  be  obliged,  if  you  will  give  him  a  full  hearing,  and  do  the 
best  you  can  to  effect  these  objects.  Yours  very  truly 

A. 


iALS-F,  Parke-Bernet  Catalog  643,  March  5-6,  ±945,  No.  411;  copy,  DLC- 
RTL.  The  facsimile  lacks  the  last  two  words  of  the  body  of  the  letter,  the 
close,  and  signature.  Bates'  Diary  records  Governor  Bramlette's  audience  with 
Lincoln  on  March  26:  "The  Govr.  says  that  the  draft  will  not  be  opposed,  if 
conducted  in  a  simple  and  honest  way  —  i.e.  enlist  the  men  and  march  them 
off,  without  making  it  a  pretence  to  insult,  and  rob,  and  dominate  every 
neighborhood  —  as  in  Maryland!" 


To  Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

Lt.  Genl.  Grant  Executive  Mansion 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington,  March  29.   1864 

Capt.  Kinney,  of  whom  I  spoke  to  you  as  desiring  to  go  on  your 
Staff,  is  now  in  your  camp  in  company  with  Mrs.  Senator  Dixon. 
Mrs.  Grant  and  I  and  some  others  agreed  last  night  that  I  should, 
by  this  despatch,  kindly  call  your  attention  to  Capt.  Kinney. 

A. 


1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  17.  General  Grant  re- 
plied on  the  same  day:  "Your  dispatch  suggesting  Capt.  Kinney  for  a  staff 
appointment  just  reed.  I  would  be  glad  to  accommodate  Capt  Kinney  but  in 
the  selection  of  staff  I  do  not  want  any  one  whom  I  do  not  personally  know 
to  be  qualified  for  the  position  assigned  them."  (DLC-RTL).  Captain  Kinney 
has  not  been  positively  identified.  Mrs.  Dixon  was  presumably  the  wife  of 
James  Dixon,  U.S.  senator  (1857-1869). 

[272] 


To  Andrew  Johnson1 

Gov.  Johnson  Executive  Mansion, 

Nashville,  Tenn.  Washington,  March  29.  1864. 

Judge  Catron  is  asking  for  the  discharge  of  W.  M.  Bell,  now  at 
Rock-Island,  and  whom  he  thinks  was  arrested  as  a  hostage  by 
you  or  by  your  authority.  What  say  you?  A.  LINCOLN 

l  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  ±6.  Governor  Johnson 
replied  on  April  i,  "Wm  Bell  was  not  arrested  by  my  authority.  I  presume  he 
is  a  prisoner  of  war.  I  have  not  been  able  to  find  out  much  about  him.  There 
are  hundreds  ...  no  doubt,  who  are  more  entitled  to  executive  clemency  than 
he  is.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  General  Meade  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  March  29.  1864. 

Your  letter  to  Col.  Townsend,  inclosing  a  slip  from  the  Herald, 
and  asking  a  Court  of  Inquiry,  has  been  laid  before  [me]  by  the 
Secretary  of  War,  with  the  request  that  I  would  consider  it.  It  is 
quite  natural  that  you  should  feel  some  sensibility  on  the  subject; 
yet  I  am  not  impressed,  nor  do  I  think  the  country  is  impressed, 
with  the  belief  that  your  honor  demands,  or  the  public  interest  de- 
mands, such  an  Inquiry.  The  country  knows  that,  at  all  events, 
you  have  done  good  service;  and  I  believe  it  agrees  with  me  that  it 
is  much  better  for  you  [to]  be  engaged  in  trying  to  do  more,  than 
to  be  diverted,  as  you  necessarily  would  be,  by  a  Court  of  Inquiry. 
Yours  truly  A.  LUSTCOUNT 

1  ALS,  NHi.  On  March  15,  1864,  General  Meade  wrote  Assistant  Adjutant 
General  Edward  D.  Townsend: 

"I  inclose  herewith  a  slip  from  the  New  York  Herald.,  containing  a  com- 
munication signed  'Historicus,'  purporting  to  give  an  account  of  the  battle  of 
Gettysburg.  .  .  .  For  the  past  fortnight  the  public  press  .  .  .  has  been  teeming 
with  articles,  all  having  for  their  object  assaults  upon  my  reputation  as  an 
officer,  and  tending  to  throw  discredit  upon  my  operations  at  Gettysburg.  .  .  . 

"I  have  not  noticed  any  of  these  attacks,  and  should  not  now  .  .  .  but  that 
the  character  of  the  communication  .  .  .  bears  such  manifest  proofs  that  it 
was  written  either  by  some  one  present  at  the  battle,  or  dictated  .  .  .  and  hav- 
ing access  ...  to  confidential  papers  that  were  never  issued  to  the  army, 
much  less  made  public. 

"I  cannot  resist  the  belief  that  this  letter  was  either  written  or  dictated  by 
Maj.  Gen.  D.  E.  Sickles.  .  .  . 

"I  have  to  ask,  therefore,  that  the  Department  will  take  steps  to  ascertain 
whether  .  .  .  Sickles  has  authorized  or  indorses  this  communication,  and,  in 
the  event  of  his  replying  in  the  affirmative,  I  have  to  request  of  the  President 
...  a  court  of  inquiry.  .  .  ."  (OR,  I,  XXVII,  I,  127-28). 

The  three-column  clipping  from  the  New  York  Herald  of  March  12,  1864, 

[273] 


MARCH     2Q,      1864 

criticized  errors  in  Meade's  report  of  the  Gettysburg  operations  and  particu- 
larly referred  to  his  failure  to  heed  advice  of  his  corps  commanders. 

Order  for  Discharge  of  Prisoners1 

March  29,  1864 

If  the  persons  whose  names  follow,  now  prisoners  of  war  shall  take 
the  oath  of  December  8,  1863,  and  be  discharged,  we,  the  under- 
signed members  of  Congress  pledge  our  honor  that  they  will  keep 
faith: 

John  F.  Rice,  at  Rock  Island,  111. 
James  J.  Moore,  at  Camp  Morton,  I 
Robert  P.  Green,  at  Johnson  Island 
James  B.  McCreay,  at  Columbus,  O. 
J.  Miller  Turner,  at  Rock  Island,  111. 
Andrew  Moore,  at  Camp  Morton,  In. 
(Signed)  Lu  Anderson  M.C. 
W.  H.  Randall  M.C. 
B.  J.  Clay  M.C. 

Let  the  above  named  prisoners  be  discharged  upon  the  condition 
stated.  *  A.  LIISTCOKN 

March  29,  1864. 

1  Angle,  p.  346.  A  note  in  the  source  describes  this  document  as  having  the 
names  of  the  prisoners  and  the  endorsement  in  Lincoln's  handwriting. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

March  29,  1864 
To  the  Senate,  and  House  of  Representatives 

Mr  Charles  B.  Stuart,  Consulting  Engineer,  appointed  such  by 
me,  upon  invitation  of  the  Governor  of  New  York,  according  to  a 
law  of  that  State,  has  made  a  Report,  upon  the  proposed  improve- 
ments to  pass  Gun-Boats  from  Tide-water  to  the  Northern  and 
North-  Western  Lakes,  which  Report  is  herewith  respectfully  trans- 
mitted for  your  consideration.  ABRAHAM 

March  29,  1864 


IDS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  sSA  Fa;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive 
Document  No.  61.  Charles  B.  Stuart's  report  of  March  24,  1864,  suggested  im- 
provements on  canals  in  New  York,  Illinois,  and  Wisconsin,  which  would  en- 
able naval  vessels  to  get  from  the  Atlantic  or  the  Gulf  of  Mexico  to  the  Great 
Lakes.  Lincoln's  communication  with  enclosures  was  referred  to  the  House 
committee  on  roads  and  canals  (March  29,  1864)  and  the  Senate  committee 
on  military  affairs  (March  30,  1864).  No  record  of  further  action  has  been 
found. 

[274] 


To  Richard  M.  Corwine1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Hon.  R.  M.  Corwine  War  Department, 

New- York.  Washington,  D.C.,  March  30  1864. 

It  does  not  occur  to  me  that  you  can  present  the  Smith  case  any 
better  than  you  have  done.  Of  this,  however,  you  must  judge  for 
yourself.  A  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  18.  See  Lincoln  to  Holt, 
February  4,  supra.  Corwine  telegraphed  from  New  York  on  March  30,  1864: 
"Continued  illness  required  me  to  leave  without  seeing  you  again.  If  I  can  be 
of  any  further  use  in  the  Smith  Case  I  will  return  otherwise  go  West  Monday*' 
(DLC-RTL). 

Order  for  Pardon  of  Henry  F.  Luckett1 

Let  this  man,  Henry  F.  Luckett,  be  pardoned,  and  sent  North. 
March.  30.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  RPB.  See  Lincoln  to  Hurlbut,  December  17,  1863,  supra.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  letter  from  Luckett's  niece,  Lizzie  L.  Rafter,  Mem- 
phis, Tennessee,  February  27,  1864,  asking  a  pardon  for  her  uncle. 

On  April  30,  Henry  F.  Luckett  wrote  Lincoln: 

"Since  it  has  been  by  your  grace  that  I  have  been  delivered  from  the  Lions 
Paw  [?]  and  have  been  permitted  to  return  home  I  deem  it  not  only  my 
duty  but  esteem  it  a  great  pleasure  and  privilege  to  express  to  you  in  this 
way  (the  best  within  my  reach)  my  profound  acknowledgements  and  sincere 
gratitude  for  the  exercise  of  your  Executive  Clemency  in  releasing  me  from  a 
condition  the  sufferings  of  which  were  more  intolerable  than  death  itself.  .  .  ." 
(DLC-RTL). 

To  Lewis  Wallace1 

[c.  March  30,  1864] 
Will  Gen.  Wallace  call  and  see  me?         A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Lew  Wallace,  An  Autobiography,  II,  684.  According  to  the  source,  this 
note  was  sent  on  a  small  card,  and  General  Wallace  caught  the  next  train  from 
Baltimore.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  March  31,  infra. 

To  William  Windom1 

Hon.  Mr.  Windom,  please  see  &  hear  Rev.  Bishop  Whipple,  about 
Indians.  He  has  much  information  on  the  subject. 

March  30.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DLC.  Bishop  Henry  B.  Whipple  of  Minnesota  was  noted  for  his 
work  in  behalf  of  the  Indians  in  his  diocese,  but  precisely  what  Lincoln 
wished  him  to  effect  through  Representative  Windom,  chairman  of  the  com- 
mittee on  Indian  affairs,  has  not  been  determined. 

[275] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

The  Vice-President  &  Senator  Fessenden  present  this  Petition  & 
join  in  the  prayer  thereof.  A  LINCOLN 

March  31.  1864 

i  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  561.  Lincoln's  endorsement 
is  written  on  a  petition  from  citizens  of  Portland,  Maine,  asking  pardon  of 
Franklin  B.  Furlong,  imprisoned  for  robbery  of  a  post  office. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  examine  &  report  on  this  case. 
March  31.  1864  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  NN  111.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  record  in  the  case  of  Joseph  M.  Bushfield.  See  Lin- 
coln to  Holt,  August  28,  1863,  and  February  9,  1864,  supra. 

Memorandum 

Concerning  Thomas  Worthington1 

Copy. 

Executive  Mansion.  March  3ist.  1864. 

Today  I  verbally  told  Colonel  Worthington  that  I  did  not  think 
him  fit  for  a  Colonel;  and  now,  upon  his  urgent  request,  I  put  it  in 
writing.  A.  LIFTCOUST. 

1  Copy,  IHi.  See  Lincoln  to  Worthington,  infra.  Colonel  Thomas  Worthing- 
ton of  the  Forty-sixth  Ohio  Infantry  is  listed  as  having  resigned  on  November 
21,  1862,  but  from,  his  letter  to  Lincoln,  April  12,  1864,  it  seems  obvious  that 
he  was  dismissed:  "On  full  consideration  I  have  declined  urging  on  Gen 
Schenck,  the  responsibility  of  my  possible  return  to  the  service.  ...  I  will 
never  reenter  the  Army  while  that  terrible  and  degrading  law  under  which 
I  have  had  no  official  notice  of  being  dismissed  continues  to  disgrace  the  statute 
book.  .  .  . 

"I  saw  something  of  its  operation  at  Memphis  .  .  .  whore  a  General  .  .  . 
scarcely  ever  clear  of  liquor  staggered  into  his  court  room  to  decide  on  the 
cases  of  men  better  and  abler  than  himself.  .  .  . 

"When  however,  the  last  section  of  the  law  of  July  i/th  1862  Chap  200 — is 
repealed,  and  Judge  Holt  &  Gen  Halleck  .  .  .  are  also,  in  thoir  proper  places, 
if  the  war  should  still  be  on  hand  I  may  possibly  request  a  removal  of  that 
disability  under  which  by  their  advice  and  initiation,  I  must  for  the  present 
remain,  hoping  for  better  luck  next  time.  With  a  very  respectful  request  that 
this  document  may  be  referred  to  either  or  both  of  these  distinguished  'Field 
Officers9.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL), 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Hon.  Sec.  of  War  March  31,  1864. 

Gen.  Wallace  has  been  with  me;  and  I  think  he  is  getting  along 
with  the  matter  we  wished  to  see  him  for,  very  satisfactorily.  It 

[276] 


APRIL      1,      1864 

is  a  great  point,  which  he  seems  to  be  effecting,  to  get  Gov.  B.  & 
Hon.  H.  W.  D.2  together.  I  have  told  him  to  be  fair,  but  to  give 
the  benefit  of  all  doubts  to  the  emancipationists.  Please  confer  with 
him,  and  add  any  suggestion  that  may  occur  to  you.  Yours  truly 

A.  LirsrcoLN 

1  ALS,  InHi. 

2  Governor  August  W.  Bradford  and  Representative  Henry  Winter  Davis. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

March  31,  1864 

I  sincerely  wish  that  something  satisfactory  to  Lt.  Col.  Scates — an 
old  personal  friend  &  most  worthy  gentleman — may  be  done  for 
him.  A.  LUNTCOLN 

March.  31.  1864 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  from  General  Edward 
O.  C.  Ord  to  Senator  Lyman  Trumbull,  New  Orleans,  February  i,  1864,  recom- 
mending that  Lieutenant  Colonel  Walter  B.  Scates  be  transferred  for  reasons  of 
health.  An  endorsement  by  Assistant  Secretary  of  War  Charles  A.  Dana,  April 
8,  ordered  that  Scates  be  relieved  from  duty  as  assistant  adjutant  general  of  the 
Thirteenth  Army  Corps  and  report  to  Washington  for  court-martial  duty. 

To  Thomas  Worthington1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Col.  Worthington  Washington,  March  31,  1864. 

If  Major  General  Schenck  will  say  in  writing  upon  this  sheet 
that  he  believes  the  public  service  would  be  advanced  by  your 
being  placed  at  the  head  of  a  Regiment  in  the  field,  I  will  remove 
any  legal  disability  resting  upon  you  so  that  the  Governor  of  Ohio 
may  appoint  you  to  so  command  a  Regiment.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  RPB.  See  Lincoln's  memorandum  concerning  Worthington,  supra.  No 
reply  from  Schenck  has  been  discovered. 

Endorsement  Concerning  Edward  Avery1 

April  i,  1864 

Let  this  man,  Edward  Avery  go  to  his  Company,  and  upon  faith- 
fully serving  out  his  term,  he  is  fully  pardoned  as  to  the  offence 
for  which  he  has  been  convicted.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  i.  1864 

1  AES,  owned  by  R.  E.  Burdick,  New  York  City.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  letter  from  Captain  Ezekiel  R.  Mayo,  Third  Maine  Battery,  March 

[277] 


APRIL     1,      1864 

29,  1864,  requesting  pardon  of  Private  Edward  Avery,  sentenced  for  desertion, 
October  29,  1863. 

To  Frederick  A.  Farley1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Reverend  and  Dear  Sir: —  April  i,  1864. 

Permit  me  to  return  my  most  cordial  thanks  for  the  beautiful 
present  transmitted  by  you,  and  for  the  kind  and  graceful  manner 
in  which  it  was  conveyed.  I  am  very  truly  yours,  A,  LirsrcoLrvr. 

Reverend  Frederick  A.  Farley,  D.D. 

1  History  of  the  Brooklyn  and  Long  Island  Fair  (Brooklyn,  1864),  P-  166. 
Reverend  Frederick  A.  Farley,  corresponding  secretary  of  the  Fair,  wrote  Lin- 
coln on  March  7,  1864,  "A  few  of  your  fellow-citizens  have  the  honor  of 
offering  ...  a  silk  'Bed-Spread,'  formed  of  the  National  Colors,  and  embla- 
zoned with  the  Stars  and  Stripes  and  the  National  Eagle."  (Ibid.). 

To  Ward  H.  Lamon1 

April  i,  1864 

In  this  case  of  Emanuel  Pollard  the  punishment  of  death  is  com- 
muted to  imprisonment  dining  life  at  hard  labor  in  the  Peniten- 
tiary. A.  LINCOLN 
April  i.  1864 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  writ  of  execution 
issued  March  31,  1864,  in  the  case  of  Emanuel  Pollard,  a  colored  man.  U.S. 
Marshal  Lamon's  endorsement  of  the  same  date  is  as  follows:  "After  receiving 
this  writ  I  proceeded  to  the  preparation  for  its  execution  up  to  April  ist.  1864. 
When  I  received  the  following  communication  from  the  President  to  wit:  [as 
above] .  Whereupon  I  presented  the  communication  to  the  prisoner  and  enquired 
of  him  whether  he  accepted  the  commutation  of  the  President,  upon  its  terms, 
having  fully  made  them  known  to  him.  Upon  receiving  his  affirmative  answer 
I  returned  him  to  his  place  of  imprisonment  to  await  the  execution  of  the 
qualified  punishment." 

Memorandum : 

Appointment  of  F.  Augustus  Schermerhorn1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  April  i.   1864. 

Mr.  Stebbins  reminds  me  of  Mrs.  Schermerhorn's  application  for 
her  son  to  West-Point. 

*  AD,  DNA  WR  RG  94,  U.S.  Military  Academy,  1861,  No.  782.  See  Lincoln's 
memorandum  of  January  22,  1862,  supra.  Henry  G.  Stebbins  was  a  member 
of  congress  from  Staten  Island,  New  York. 

[278] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  April  i.  1864. 

Senator  Harlan  tells  me  that  the  nomination  of  Col.  Chambers 
as  a  Brig.  Gen.  for  Iowa  was  rejected  by  the  Senate  to-day;  and  he 
asks  that  Col.  E.  Hatch  of  the  2nd.  Iowa  Cavalry  be  nominated  in 
the  place.  I  remember  Col.  Hatch  to  be  very  excellently  recom^ 
mended;  and  I  am  content  if  you  know  nothing  to  the  contrary 
If  all  right  send  me  the  nomination.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  NHi.  Alexander  Chambers  was  colonel  of  the  Sixteenth  Iowa  Volun- 
teers. Colonel  Edward  Hatch  of  the  Second  Iowa  Cavalry  was  appointed  briga- 
dier general  on  April  27,  1864. 

Order  Prohibiting  Export  of  Salted  Provisions1 

Ordered:  Executive  Mansion,  April,  2d.,  1864. 

That  the  Executive  Order  of  September,  4th.,  1863,  in  relation 
to  the  exportation  of  live  stock  from  the  United  States,  be  so  ex- 
tended, as  to  prohibit  the  exportations  of  all  classes  of  salted  pro- 
visions from  any  port  of  the  United  States  to  any  foreign  port,  ex- 
cept, that  meats,  cured,  salted  or  packed  in  any  state  or  territory, 
bordering  on  the  Pacific  ocean,  may  be  exported  from  any  port  of 
such  state  or  territory.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

IDS,  Saddle  and  Sirloin  Club,  Union  Stock  Yards,  Chicago,  Illinois.  This 
order  appears  in  the  Official  Records,  III,  IV,  212.  On  April  8  Secretary  Chase 
wrote  Lincoln:  "An  order  signed  by  you,  and  prohibiting  the  exportation  of 
salted  provisions  from  any  port  of  the  United  States,  excepting  any  otate  or 
Territory  bordering  on  the  Pacific  Ocean,  has  this  day  been  transmitted  to  me, 
for  information,  by  the  Secretary  of  War.  Not  having  been  consulted  as  to 
the  making  of  this  order,  I  am  necessarily  ignorant  of  the  public  reasons  which 
are  supposed  to  require  it;  but  as  its  effects  on  our  foreign  trade,  and  conse- 
quently upon  the  finances,  must  be  very  serious,  I  respectfully  suggest  the 
suspension  of  its  operation  until  I  can  lay  before  you  a  statement  of  the  mag- 
nitude and  relations  of  the  commercial  movements  affected  by  it."  (DLC- 
Nicolay  Papers).  On  the  same  day  Nicolay  replied:  "In  answer  to  your  note  of 
today  the  President  directs  me  to  say  that  the  order  concerning  the  exportation 
of  salted  provisions  has  not  yet  been  issued.  It  was  merely  printed  and  sent  to 
you  for  examination  and  will  not  be  issued  before  a  full  consultation  with 
yourself."  (DNA  FI  RG  56,  General  Records  of  the  Treasury  Department, 
Letters  from  Executive  Officers,  Part  I,  Volume  I,  10.) 

To  Joseph  H.  Barrett1 

J.  H.  Barrett,  Cora,  of  Pensions,  please  call  and  see  me. 

April  3.  1864.  A.  LmcoLixr 

[279] 


APRIL     4,       1864 

1  ALS-F,  Joseph  H.  Barrett,  Abraham  Lincoln  and  His  Presidency  (1904),  II, 
370.  According  to  the  source,  Lincoln  conferred  with  Barrett  concerning  "the 
attempted  movement  to  postpone  the  Baltimore  convention,  called  to  meet  in 
June.  He  wanted  this  scheme  defeated,  and,  in  fact,  it  never  gained  much 
headway.  .  .  ." 

To  Edward  Bates1 

April  4,  1864 

Attorney  General  please  give  me  your  legal  opinion  whether  the 
Pay-Master  should  have  paid  as  demanded,  and  if  yea,  is  it  the 
duty  of  the  President  to  order  him  to  pay?  A.  LUNTCOLXST 

April  4.  1864. 

1 AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Gov- 
ernor John  A.  Andrew,  March  24,  1864,  concerning  the  case  of  Samuel  Har- 
rison, a  Negro  chaplain  of  the  Fifty-fourth  Massachusetts  Volunteers.  Although 
appointed  and  regularly  commissioned  by  Andrew,  Harrison  had  been  refused 
his  pay  of  $100  per  month  and  two  rations  per  day,  on  the  grounds  that  the 
law  of  July  17,  1862,  fixed  pay  of  colored  persons  at  $10  per  month  and  one 
ration  per  day,  which  amount  Harrison  refused.  Bates  replied  on  April  23  that 
Harrison  should  have  been  paid,  inasmuch  as  he  had  been  lawfully  appointed 
and  mustered  into  the  U.S.  service  and  his  appointment  was  not  based  on  the 
law  of  July  17,  1862.  Bates  also  gave  his  opinion  that  the  president  should  di- 
rect the  War  Department  to  notify  all  paymasters  that  such  was  his  view  of 
the  case.  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate,  May  7,  infra. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

April  4,  1864 

Will  the  Attorney  General  please  give  me  his  opinion  whether  the 
President  has  legal  power  to  remit  the  fine  in  the  case  as  within 
stated?  A.  LINCOLN 

April  4.  1864 

!AES,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  communication  signed  by 
representatives  and  senators  from  Indiana,  March  29,  1864,  asking  that  the 
president  remit  the  fine  of  $500  assessed  against  John  Caldwell  of  Morgan 
County,  Indiana,  for  aiding  a  deserter.  Caldwell  had  died,  leaving  a  wife  and 
three  children  in  destitute  circumstances.  See  Lincoln  to  Bates,  April  18,  infra. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  W.  H.  Randall,  knows  Judge  Woodson  &  concurs  in  this 
recommendation.  A.  LIISTCOLN 

April  4.  1864.     File 

1  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Samuel  F. 
Miller,  Associate  Justice  of  the  U.S.  Supreme  Court,  April  4,  1864,  recom- 
mending Silas  Woodson  of  Missouri  for  appointment  as  Chief  Justice  of  Mon- 
tana Territory.  Woodson  was  not  appointed. 

[280] 


Endorsement1 

I  wish  this  brought  to  my  notice  at  the  right  time. 

April  4.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  RPB.  Lincoln's  endorsement  has  been  clipped  from  attendant  papers 
and  mounted  between  the  covers  of  a  book,  but  bears  the  notation  that  "It  was 
given  to  Genl.  [Edward  C.]  Carrington,  when  he  was  U.S.  Atty.  for  W.  D.C." 

To  Albert  G.  Hodges1 

A.  G.  Hodges,  Esq  Executive  Mansion, 

Frankfort,  Ky.  Washington,  April  4,  1864. 

My  dear  Sir:  You  ask  me  to  put  in  writing  the  substance  of  what 
I  verbally  said  the  other  day,  in  your  presence,  to  Governor  Bram- 
lette  and  Senator  Dixon.  It  was  about  as  follows: 

"I  am  naturally  anti-slavery.  If  slavery  is  not  wrong,  nothing  is 
wrong.  I  can  not  remember  when  I  did  not  so  think,  and  feel.  And 
yet  I  have  never  understood  that  the  Presidency  conferred  upon 
me  an  unrestricted  right  to  act  officially  upon  this  judgment  and 
feeling.  It  was  in  the  oath  I  took  that  I  would,  to  the  best  of  my 
ability,  preserve,  protect,  and  defend  the  Constitution  of  the  United 
States.  I  could  not  take  the  office  without  taking  the  oath.  Nor  was 
it  my  view  that  I  might  take  an  oath  to  get  power,  and  break  the 
oath  in  using  the  power.  I  understood,  too,  that  in  ordinary  civil 
administration  this  oath  even  forbade  me  to  practically  indulge  my 
primary  abstract  judgment  on  the  moral  question  of  slavery.  I  had 
publicly  declared  this  many  times,  and  in  many  ways.  And  I  aver 
that,  to  this  day,  I  have  done  no  official  act  in  mere  deference  to 
my  abstract  judgment  and  feeling  on  slavery.  I  did  understand 
however,  that  my  oath  to  preserve  the  constitution  to  the  best  of 
my  ability,  imposed  upon  me  the  duty  of  preserving,  by  every  in- 
dispensable means,  that  government — that  nation — of  which  that 
constitution  was  the  organic  law.  Was  it  possible  to  lose  the  na- 
tion, and  yet  preserve  the  constitution?  By  general  law  life  and 
limb  must  be  protected;  yet  often  a  limb  must  be  amputated  to  save 
a  life;  but  a  life  is  never  wisely  given  to  save  a  limb.  I  felt  that 
measures,  otherwise  unconstitutional,  might  become  lawful,  by 
becoming  indispensable  to  the  preservation  of  the  constitution, 
through  the  preservation  of  the  nation.  Right  or  wrong,  I  assumed 
this  ground,  and  now  avow  it.  I  could  not  feel  that,  to  the  best  of 
my  ability,  I  had  even  tried  to  preserve  the  constitution,  if,  to  save 
slavery,  or  any  minor  matter,  I  should  permit  the  wreck  of  govern- 
ment, country,  and  Constitution  all  together.  When,  early  in  the 
war,  Gen.  Fremont  attempted  military  emancipation,  I  forbade  it, 

[281] 


APRIL     4,      1864 

because  I  did  not  then  think  it  an  indispensable  necessity.  When  a 
little  later,  Gen.  Cameron,  then  Secretary  of  War,  suggested  the 
arming  of  the  blacks,  I  objected,  because  I  did  not  yet  think  it  an 
indispensable  necessity.  When,  still  later,  Gen.  Hunter  attempted 
military  emancipation,  I  again  forbade  it,  because  I  did  not  yet  think 
the  indispensable  necessity  had  come.  When,  in  March,  and  May, 
and  July  1862  I  made  earnest,  and  successive  appeals  to  the  border 
states  to  favor  compensated  emancipation,  I  believed  the  indis- 
pensable necessity  for  military  emancipation,  and  arming  the 
blacks  would  come,  unless  averted  by  that  measure.  They  declined 
the  proposition;  and  I  was,  in  my  best  judgment,  driven  to  the  al- 
ternative of  either  surrendering  the  Union,  and  with  it,  the  Consti- 
tution, or  of  laying  strong  hand  upon  the  colored  element.  I  chose 
the  latter.  In  choosing  it,  I  hoped  for  greater  gain  than  loss;  but  of 
this,  I  was  not  entirely  confident.  More  than  a  year  of  trial  now 
shows  no  loss  by  it  in  our  foreign  relations,  none  in  our  home  popu- 
lar sentiment,  none  in  our  white  military  force, — no  loss  by  it 
any  how  or  any2  where.  On  the  contrary,  it  shows  a  gain  of  quite 
a  hundred  and  thirty  thousand  soldiers,  seamen,  and  laborers. 
These  are  palpable  facts,  about  which,  as  facts,  there  can  be  no 
cavilling.  We  have  the  men;  and  we  could  not  have  had  them 
without  the  measure. 

["]  And  now  let  any  Union  man  who  complains  of  the  measure, 
test  himself  by  writing  down  in  one  line  that  he  is  for  subduing 
the  rebellion  by  force  of  arms;  and  in  the  next,  that  he  is  for  tak- 
ing these  hundred  and  thirty  thousand  men  from  the  Union  side, 
and  placing  them  where  they  would  be  but  for  the  measure  he 
condemns.  If  he  can  not  face  his  case  so  stated,  it  is  only  because 
he  can  not  face  the  truth.  ["] 

I  add  a  word  which  was  not  in  the  verbal  conversation.  In  telling 
this  tale  I  attempt  no  compliment  to  my  own  sagacity.  I  claim  not 
to  have  controlled  events,  but  confess  plainly  that  events  have  con- 
trolled me.  Now,  at  the  end  of  three  years  struggle  the  nation's  con- 
dition  is  not  what  either  party,  or  any  man  devised,  or  expected. 
God  alone  can  claim  it.  Whither  it  is  tending  seems  plain.  If  God 
now  wills  the  removal  of  a  great  wrong,  and  wills  also  that  we  of 
the  North  as  well  as  you  of  the  South,  shall  pay  fairly  for  our  com- 
plicity in  that  wrong,  impartial  history  will  find  therein  new  cause 
to  attest  and  revere  the  justice  and  goodness  of  God.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

lADfS,  DLC-RTL.  Albert  G.  Hodges,  editor  of  the  Frankfort,  Kentucky, 
Commonwealth,  and  Archibald  Dixon,  former  senator  from  Kentucky,  1852- 
1855,  met  with  Lincoln  on  March  26  to  discuss  border  state  problems.  Orville 

[282] 


APRIL     4,      1864 

H.  Browning's  Diary  under  date  of  April  3,  1864,  records  the  visit:  "The  Presi- 
dent told  me  that  a  few  days  before  Govr  Bramlett  of  Ky:  Hon  Archibald 
Dixon  &  Mr  Hodges  of  the  same  state  had  called  upon  him  in  regard  to  the 
enlistment  of  slaves  as  soldiers  in  Ky,  in  reference  to  which  there  has  been 
much  dissatisfaction  in  that  State,  and  that  everything  had  been  amicably  ad- 
justed between  them,  and  that  they  had  gone  home  satisfied.  He  said  when 
they  were  discussing  the  matter  he  asked  them  to  let  him  make  a  little  speech 
to  them,  which  he  did  and  with  which  they  were  much  pleased.  That  after- 
wards Mr  Hodges  came  back  to  him,  and  asked  him  to  give  him  a  copy  of  his 
remarks  to  take  with  him  to  Ky.  He  told  Mr  Hodges  that  what  he  had  said 
was  not  written,  and  that  he  had  not  then  time  to  commit  it  to  paper — but  to 
go  home  and  he  would  write  him  a  letter  in  which  he  would  give,  as  nearly 
as  he  could  all  that  he  had  said  to  them  orally.  .  .  ."  See  further,  Lincoln  to 
Hodges,  April  22,  infra.  2  "Any"  inserted  by  an  unidentified  person. 

To  Isabel  II1 

April  4,  1864 
Abraham  Lincoln. 

President  of  the  United  States  of  America 
To  Her  Majesty  Dona  Isabel  II, 

By  the  Grace  of  God  and  the  Constitution  of  the  Spanish  Mon- 
archy, Queen  of  Spain,  &c,  &c,  &c. 

Great  Good  Friend:  I  have  received  the  letter  which  your  Maj- 
esty was  pleased  to  address  to  me  on  the  24th.  of  February  last, 
announcing  that  Your  Majesty  had,  on  the  12th.  of  that  month, 
safely  given  birth  to  an  Infanta  who  had  received  in  baptism  the 
names  of  Maria,  Eulalia,  Francisco  de  Asis,  Margarite,  Roberta 
Isabel,  Francisca  de  Paula,  Cristina  Maria  de  la  Piedad. 

Your  Majesty  does  no  more  than  justice  to  the  friendly  feelings 
of  the  United  States  in  beliveing  that  they  participate  with  Your 
Majesty  and  Royal  Family  in  the  joy  consequent  upon  this  event: 
and  I  beg  Your  Majesty  to  accept  my  sincere  congratulations 

May  God  have  your  Majesty  always  in  His  holy  keeping  Your 
Good  Friend  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Washington  April  4th  1864. 
By  the  President 

WILLIAM  H.  SEWARD     Secretary  of  State. 

1  Copy,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Communications  to  Foreign  Sovereigns  and  States, 
III,  227. 

To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Major  General  Rosecrans  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  April  4th,  1864. 

This  is  rather  more  social  than  official,  containing  suggestions 
rather  than  orders.  I  somewhat  dread  the  effect  of  your  Special 

[283] 


APRIL     4,      1864 

Order,  No.  61  dated  March  7.  1864.  I  have  found  that  men  who 
have  not  even  been  suspected  of  disloyalty,  are  very  averse  to  tak- 
ing an  oath  of  any  sort  as  a  condition,  to  exercising  an  ordinary 
right  of  citizenship.  The  point  will  probably  be  made,  that  while 
men  may  without  an  oath,  assemble  in  a  noisy  political  meeting, 
they  must  take  the  oath,  to  assemble  in  a  religious  meeting. 

It  is  said,  I  know  not  whether  truly,  that  in  some  parts  of 
Missouri,  assassinations  are  systematically  committed  upon  re- 
turned rebels,  who  wish  to  ground  arms,  and  behave  themselves. 
This  should  not  be.  Of  course  I  have  not  heard  that  you  give 
countenance  to,  or  wink  at  such  assassinations. 

Again,  it  is  complained,  that  the  enlistment  of  negroes,  is  not 
conducted  in  as  orderly  a  manner,  and  with  as  little  collateral 
provocation,  as  it  might  be. 

So  far  you  have  got  along  in  the  Department  of  the  Missouri, 
rather  better  than  I  dared  to  hope;  and  I  congratulate  you  and  my- 
self upon  it.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  LS  (copy?),  DLC-RTL.  Bates'  Diary  under  date  of  April  10,  1864,  records 
that  this  letter  was  written  "at  my  instance  ...  to  stop  .  .  .  useless  and 
wanton  interference  with  the  churches.  .  .  ."  See  Lincoln's  endorsement  to 
John  Hogan,  February  13,  and  memorandum  about  churches,  March  4,  supra. 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  April  4,  1864 

I  herewith  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action 
thereon,  a  treaty  concluded  June  9,  1863,  between  C.  H.  Hale, 
superintendent  of  Indian  affairs,  Charles  Hutchins,  and  S.  D. 
Howe,  Indian  agents,  on  the  part  of  the  United  States,  and  the 
chiefs,  headmen,  and  delegates  of  the  Nez  Perce  tribe  of  Indians 
in  Washington  Territory. 

A  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  of  the  i  st  instant,  with 
a  letter  from  the  Commissioner  of  Indian  Affairs,  of  the  2d  ultimo, 
proposing  amendments  to  the  treaty,  together  with  a  report  of 
Superintendent  Hale  on  the  subject  and  a  synopsis  of  the  proceed- 
ings of  the  council  held  with  the  Nez  Perce  Indians,  are  herewith 
transmitted  for  the  consideration  of  the  Senate. 

Executive  Office,  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN. 

Washington  April  4,  1864. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  471.  On  April  5,  the  treaty  and  accompanying 
papers  were  referred  to  the  committee  on  Indian  affairs  and  a  remonstrance  of 

" McDaniels  and  others"  against  ratification  of  the  ninth  article  of  the 

treaty  was  read.  The  treaty  as  amended  was  ratified  on  June  26,  1866. 

[284] 


To  Ambrose  W.  Thompson1 

Ambrose  W.  Thompson  Executive  Mansion, 

My  Dear  Sir  Washington,  April  4,  1864. 

Yours  of  yesterday  is  just  received.  The  financial  scheme  you 
suggest  I  shall  consider  further,  but  I  have  not  time  to  form  a  con- 
clusion which  could  reach  you  by  the  6th. 

I  shall  be  glad  to  hear  from  you  in  Europe  as  you  suggest.  Yours 
truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  DfS,  DLC-RTL.  On  April  3,  Thompson  wrote,  "In  continuation  of  the  con- 
versation of  Saturday  ....  I  beg  to  make  one  suggestion.  Negotiate  a  loan 
of  one  hundred  millions  in  Europe  upon  the  condition  that  the  money  or  its 
average  amount  is  to  remain  there  in  Bankers  hands.  Use  this  as  a  credit  to 
break  down  Exchange.  Gold  falls  with  Exchange — prices  of  Subsistence  with 
gold.  ...  If  you  have  the  amount  named  to  your  credit  in  Europe,  draw 
against  it — sell  the  exchange  at  a  gradually  reducing  rate  so  as  not  to  create 
ruin  of  present  holders,  remit  the  amount  received  for  sales,  to  keep  the  credit 
intact — and  you  have  control  of  the  markets.  Army  supplies  will  be  reduced 
one  half.  .  .  .  Who  would  then  doubt  the  skill  of  the  movement,  or  fail  to 
render  praise  at  the  result?  It  would  crush  the  Chase  faction  at  a  blow,  and  .  .  . 
it  would  also  crush  out  the  Confederate  negotiations  for  Capital.  ...  If  you 
wish  I  can  make  quiet  inquiries  &  write  you  from  England  an  outline  of  the 
whole  matter.  I  shall  sail  on  the  morning  of  the  6th  instant.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL) . 


To  Nathaniel  R  Banks1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Banks  Washington,  April  5.  1864. 

I  have  received  a  letter  from  Gen.  Charles  E  Stone,  indorsed  by 
yourself,  asking  that  "some  act,  some  word,  some  order  may  issue 
from  the  Executive  which  shall  place  my  name  clear  of  reproach 
&c."  Nothing  more  definite  than  this  is  indicated  as  to  what  Gen. 
Stone  desires  me  to  do,  or  supposes  I  can  do  in  the  case.  I  can  only 
state  the  facts  of  the  case  from  memory,  and,  of  course  not  with 
great  minuteness  or  accuracy.  Gen.  Stone  was  arrested,  as  I  now 
think,  early  in  February  1862.  Owing  to  sickness  in  my  family,  the 
Secretary  of  War  made  the  arrest  without  notifying  me  that  he 
had  it  in  contemplation.  Gen.  McClellan  was  then  General-in- 
chief,  with  Head  Quarters  at  Washington,  and  Gen.  Stone  was 
commanding  a  Division  twentyfive  or  thirty  miles  above  on  the 
Potomac.  Learning  of  the  arrest  I  inquired  for  the  cause,  and  found 
it,  or  the  evidence  constituting  it  to  consist  of  three  classes.  First, 
the  evidence  taken  in  writing  by  the  Committee  of  Congress  on 
the  conduct  of  the  War.  The  point  supposed  to  be  made  by  this 
against  General  Stone  was  that  when  before  the  committee  at  one 
time,  and  excusing  himself  for  not  having  sent  a  force  from  one 

[285] 


APRIL     5,      1864 

point  to  another  during  the  battle  in  which  Col.  Baker  was  killed, 
he  stated  that  the  enemy  had  a  redoubt  or  dirt  fort  on  the  route 
which  could  not  be  passed.  Afterwards  the  committee,  conceiving 
that  Gen.  Stone  could  have  prevented  the  erection  of  that  fort,  and 
ought  to  have  done  so,  called  him  before  them  again  to  inquire 
why  he  did  not,  and  he  then  denied  that  there  ever  had  been  a  fort 
at  that  place.  I  did  not  think  the  evidence,  as  read  to  me,  made  the 
point  conclusively  against  the  general;  but  that  evidence,  whatever 
it  is,  I  suppose  is  still  accessible. 

Secondly,  evidence  taken  and  put  in  the  form  of  a  report  by  a 
detective  of  Gen.  McClellan. 

i  ADf,  DLC-RTL.  Presumably  this  letter  was  never  completed  or  sent.  Gen- 
eral Stone's  letter  of  February  15,  1864,  states: 

"As  a  soldier,  I  make  to  you  my  last  appeal  for  justice.  ...  It  is  now  more 
than  two  years  since  I  was  suddenly  taken  from  the  command  of  one  of  the 
largest  and  finest  divisions  of  the  Army,  and  incarcerated  in  a  prison  set  aside 
for  traitors.  .  .  . 

"I  remained  in  prison  one  hundred  and  eighty  nine  days,  as  true  a  soldier  of 
the  United  States  as  remained  in  her  armies.  .  .  . 

"I  will  not  recal  the  frequent  appeals  which  I  made.  .  .  .  Appeals  for  ap- 
pearance of  accuser — appeals  for  statement  of  accusation — appeals  for  hearing — 
appeals  for  opportunity  of  service. 

"It  is  sufficient  that  none  were  ever  regarded.  ...  I  was  discharged  without 
ever  having  seen  accusation  or  the  name  of  an  accuser.  .  .  . 

"After  six  months  of  imprisonment  and  nine  months  of  forced  inactivity  .  .  . 
I  was  suddenly  ordered  ...  to  report  for  duty  in  the  Department  of  the 
Gulf.  .  .  . 

"A  new  campaign  is  now  about  to  open.  It  may  be  the  last  of  many  which  I 
have  had  the  fortune  to  participate  in.  It  will  perhaps  be  fortunate  for  all 
concerned  that  it  should  be  so.  .  .  . 

"I  respectfully  ask,  for  the  sake  of  the  Service  which  I  have  loved  and  never 
dishonored,  and  for  the  sake  of  my  name  in  history  to  be  read  by  my  descend- 
ants, that  some  act,  some  word,  some  order  shall  issue  from  the  Executive 
which  shall  place  my  name  clear  of  reproach,  as  I  know  it  should  be.  .  .  ." 
(DLC-RTL). 

See  Lincoln's  communications  to  Hamlin,  April  28,  -1862,  and  to  the  Senate, 
May  i,  1862,  supra.  General  Stone  resigned  from  the  army  on  September  13, 
1864. 

To  Edward  Bates1 

DeWitt.  C.  Ballou  April  5,  1864 

Pardon. 

Will  the  Attorney  General  please  preserve  these  papers?  It  may  be 
easier  hereafter  than  now,  to  grant  a  pardon  in  the  case. 

April  5.  1864  A.L. 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  528.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  an  envelope  containing  a  petition  for  pardon  of  DeWitt  C.  Ballou  of 
Missouri,  convicted  of  conspiracy. 

[286] 


Endorsement  Concerning  John  F.  Botts1 

April  5,  1864 

I  think  the  Department  Commander,  with  his  assistants,  should, 
with  reference  to  the  public  peace  and  security  on  the  one  hand, 
and  humanity  on  the  other,  decide  applications  of  this  class. 
April  5.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

i  Copy,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  207,  Regis- 
ter notation.  The  transcript  preserved  in  the  register  is  of  an  endorsement  by 
Lincoln  on  a  letter  of  John  S.  Clark  concerning  John  F.  Botts,  banished  South 
from  Missouri  and  wishing  to  return. 

To  Mrs.  Horace  Mann1 

Mrs.  Horace  Mann,  Executive  Mansion, 

Madam,  Washington,  April  5,  1864. 

The  petition  of  persons  under  eighteen,  praying  that  I  would 
free  all  slave  children,  and  the  heading  of  which  petition  it  appears 
you  wrote,  was  handed  me  a  few  days  since  by  Senator  Sumner. 
Please  tell  these  little  people  I  am  very  glad  their  young  hearts 
are  so  full  of  just  and  generous  sympathy,  and  that,  while  I  have 
not  the  power  to  grant  all  they  ask,  I  trust  they  will  remember  that 
God  has,  and  that,  as  it  seems.  He  wills  to  do  it.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

i  ADf S,  DLC-RTL;  ALS-F,  ISLA.  See  Lincoln  to  Sumner,  infra.  The  "Pe- 
tition of  the  Children  of  the  United  States;  that  the  President  will  free  all  slave 
children"  bears  one  hundred  ninety-five  signatures  (DLC-RTL).  In  reply  to 
Lincoln's  letter,  forwarded  by  Senator  .Sumner,  Mrs.  Mann  wrote:  "It  was 
wholly  without  my  knowledge  that  my  name  was  sent  to  you  in  connection 
with  the  petition  of  persons  under  eighteen  in  Concord  .  .  .  but  I  cannot  re- 
gret it,  since  it  has  given  me  this  precious  note  from  your  hand.  .  .  .  We  in- 
tend immediately  to  scatter  fac-similes  of  your  sweet  words  to  the  children  like 
apple  blossoms  all  over  the  country — and  we  look  with  more  hope  than  ever 
for  the  day  when  perfect  justice  shall  be  decreed,  which  shall  make  every  able 
bodied  colored  man  spring  to  the  defence  of  the  nation  which  it  is  plain  the 
white  man  alone  cannot  save.  .  .  ."  .(Ibid.). 

In  deference  to  Mrs.  Mann's  desire  to  remain  anonymous,  the  facsimiles, 
which  were  widely  distributed,  show  instead  of  "Mrs.  Horace  Mann"  "Mrs. 
(of  Concord  Mass.)." 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

I  leave  to  the  Sec.  of  War  whether  this  shall  be  brought  to  the 
notice  of  Gen.  Grant  A.  LINCOLN 

April  5.  1864 

1  AES,  NHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  telegram  from  Governor 
Andrew  Johnson,  April  5,  1864:  "The  papers  state  that  Genl  Buell  is  to  be  sent 
to  Knoxville  to  take  Command.  I  trust  in  god  that  Gen  Buell  will  not  be  sent 

[287] 


APRIL     5,      1864 

to  Tennessee.  We  have  been  cursed  with  him  here  once  and  do  not  desire  its 
repetition.  We  had  a  fine  meeting  at  Shelbyville.  Went  off  well  General 
Ro[u]sseau  made  a  fine  speech  taking  high  ground  on  the  negro  question  which 
will  I  think  do  great  good  in  Kentucky  and  Tennessee  If  Genl  Ro[u]sseau  had 
leave  of  absence  for  a  short  time  which  would  enable  him  to  visit  Kentucky  and 
make  some  speeches  in  that  state  such  as  he  made  at  Shelbyville  it  would  do 
much  good  in  putting  down  copperheads  and  traitors.  If  this  suggestion  was 
made  to  Genl  Thomas  I  have  no  doubt  he  would  grant  him  leave  of  absence 
for  the  present.  His  services  would  be  invaluable  in  Kentucky." 

General  Buell  had  been  before  a  Military  Commission  to  investigate  his  Ken- 
tucky and  Tennessee  campaign  of  November  24,  1862  to  May  10,  1863,  and 
was  awaiting  orders  at  Indianapolis.  On  June  i,  1864,  he  resigned. 

To  Charles  Sumner1 

If  Senator  Sumner  thinks  it  would  be  proper,  he  may  forward 
the  inclosed  to  Mrs.  Mann.  A.L. 

April  5.  1864 
1  ALS,  CSmH.  See  Lincoln  to  Mrs.  Horace  Mann,  supra. 

To  Robert  B.  Van  Valkenburgh1 

April  5,  1864 

If  Hon.  Mr.  Van  Valkenburgh  will  say  distinctly  in  writing  that 

he  desires  the  discharge  of  Reuben  C.  Ward,  he  shall  be  discharged. 

April  5.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

Let  said  Reuben  C.  Ward  be  discharged.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  5.  1864. 

1  AES,  owned  by  Roy  G.  Fitzgerald,  Dayton,  Ohio.  Lincoln's  first  endorse- 
ment is  written  on  a  letter  from  Representative  Robert  B.  Van  Valkenburgh, 
April  i,  1864,  introducing  Mrs.  Ward  "a  widow  residing  in  my  district.  She 
has  only  two  sons  both  in  the  5oth  Regt  N.Y.V.  Since  their  enlistment  her  hus- 
band has  died,  and  she  desires  that  one  of  her  sons  be  discharged.  .  .  ."  The 
second  endorsement  is  written  on  Van  Valkenburgh's  note  of  April  5,  1864,  ask- 
ing that  Reuben  C.  Ward  be  discharged. 

To  John  Catron1 

Mr.  Justice  Catron  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  April  6,  1864. 

Mrs.  Masson  comes  to  me  with  a  note  of  introduction  from  you. 
She  asks  that  James  H.  McEwen,  now  a  prisoner  [of]  war  at  Rock- 
Island,  Illinois  [be  pardoned] .  If  you  will  write  below  on  this  sheet 
that  if  he  shall  take  the  oath  of  December  8.  and  be  discharged, 
you  pledge  your  honor  he  will  keep  faith,  I  will  order  his  discharge. 
Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Henry  R.  Benjamin,  New  York  City.  No  reply  from  Judge 
Catron  has  been  found,  and  neither  Mrs.  Masson  nor  McEwen  has  been  iden- 
tified. 

[288] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If  the  services  can  be  made  available  let  Hon.  Mr.  Whaley  be 
obliged  by  the  appointment  within  requested  A.  LIISTCOLN 

April  6,  1864 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  -written  on  a  letter  of  U.S.  Representa- 
tive Kellian  V.  Whaley  of  West  Virginia,  to  Stanton,  April  5,  1864,  recom- 
mending appointment  of  J.  Mabbett  Brown  as  quartermaster  or  commissary 
of  subsistence  with  rank  of  captain.  No  record  of  Brown's  appointment  has 
been  discovered. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Major  General  Butler.  Washington,  April  7,  1864. 

Mrs.  L.  and  I  think  we  will  visit  Fort-Monroe  some  time  next 
week;  meanwhile  whatever  is  to  be  done  on  the  business-subject2 
will  be  conducted  through  the  War  Department.  Please  do  not 
make  public  our  probable  visit.  A  LINCOLN 

1  ADfS,  DLC-RTL;  LS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  22.  A 
telegram  from  John  Hay  to  Butler,  April  6,   1864,  authorizing  Butler  to  visit 
Washington  at  the  president's   direction,   was   amended  by   Stanton   so    as   to 
read  "you  will  submit  by  letter  or  telegram  to  the  Secretary  of  War  the  points 
in  relation  to  the  exchange  of  prisoners  whenever  you  wish  instructions  and 
that  it  is  not  necessary  for  you  to  visit  Washington  for  the  purpose  indicated." 
(DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  20).  Butler  replied  on  the  same 
day,  "I  beg  leave  to  assure  the  President  that  I  have  no  desire  to  visit  Wash- 
ington, but  wish  he  should  visit  Fortress  Monroe  as  expressed  in  my  telegram 
of   Saturday."    (Private  and  Official  Correspondence  of  General  Benjamin  F. 
Butler.  .  .  .  ,  IV,  29).  See  further,  Lincoln  to  Butler,  April  11,  infra. 

2  Perhaps  Lincoln  refers  to  Butler's  confiscation  of  the  estate  of  John  Wil- 
liams of  Portsmouth,  Virginia.  See  Butler  to  Stanton,  April  4,  1864,  op.  cit.^  IV,  16. 

To  Simon  Cameron1 

Hon.  Simon  Cameron  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir.  Washington,  April  7,  1864. 

I  have  this  moment,  only,  received  yours  of  March  2Qth.  I  "will 
see  you  any  time  it  is  convenient  for  you  to  come.  Yours  truly 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DLC-Cameron  Papers.  Cameron's  letter  of  March  29,  1864,  is  as  fol- 
lows: 

"I  had  a  letter  this  morning  from  a  very  intelligent  politician  of  much  influ- 
ence in  N.  York  urging  me  to  consent  to  a  postponement  of  the  convention  till 
Sept.  Some  time  ago  a  committee  called  on  me  to  urge  the  same  matter 

"These  things  and  others  that  have  come  to  my  view,  convince  me  that  it 
will  be  vigorously  urged  and  that  if  it  is  not  vigorously  resisted,  it  will  succeed. 

"In  connection  with  this  it  is  well  known  that  Mr.  Seward  has  never  ceased 
to  think  he  will  succeed  you,  and  that  his  faithful  manager  hopes  to  carry  him 

[289] 


APRIL      7,      1864 

into  the  Presidency  next  March,  by  his  skill,  aided  perhaps  by  the  millions 
made  in  N.  York  by  army  &  navy  contracts. 

"Another,  and  I  think  a  wiser  party,  look  to  the  election  of  Genl.  Dix.  The 
least  failure  this  summer,  some  men  think,  will  evince  [?]  your  defeat,  by 
bringing  forward  a  negative  man,  with  a  cultivated  character  such  as  Dix  has 
acquired  by  avoiding  all  responsibility,  &  always  obtaining  with  every  party  in 
power  a  high  position. 

"I  am  against  all  postponements  &  I  presume  you  are,  but  I  look  upon  this 
movement  as  being  so  formidable  that  I  should  like  to  have  a  full  &  free  con-  , 
versation  with  you  concerning  it  &  the  campaign.  There  are  many  points  which 
would  probably  enable  me  to  do  more  service — &  as  I  am  in  the  contest,  with 
no  wish  saving  your  success — and  with  little  business  to  interfere,  I  desire  to 
guard  against  all  surprizes.  You  are  always  so  much  employed  when  I  am  in 
Washington  that  I  have  hesitated  to  occupy  your  time — but,  if  you  will  drop  me 
a  line  saying  when  I  can  come  to  your  house  with  a  chance  of  an  hours  unin- 
terrupted talk,  I  will  obey  it. 

"I  came  from  Ft.  Monroe  yesterday  after  spending  three  days  there,  during 
which  time  I  had  much  pleasant  conversation  with  Genl.  Butler — part  of  which 
I  would  like  to  communicate  to  you."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  the  House  of  Representatives1 

To  the  House  of  Representatives:  April  7,  1864 

I  transmit  herewith  a  report  from  the  Secretary  of  War,  in  an- 
swer to  the  Resolution  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of  the  4th. 
instant,  in  relation  to  Major  N.  H.  McLean. 

Washington,  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

April  7th.  1864. 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  67.  The  resolution  passed 
on  April  4,  1864,  requested  the  president  to  communicate  the  reasons  why 
Major  Nathaniel  H.  McLean,  adjutant  general  of  the  Department  of  the  Ohio 
(August  23,  1862  to  December  26,  1863),  had  been  ordered  to  Fort  Vancouver 
as  assistant  to  the  provost  marshal  general  and  superintendent  of  recruiting 
service  in  Oregon  and  Washington  Territory.  Stanton's  report  of  April  7,  trans- 
mitted by  Lincoln,  reads  as  follows: 

"In  answer  to  the  resolution  of  the  House  .  .  .  dated  April  4.  ...  I  have 
the  honor  to  state — 

"i.  That  Major  McLean  was  ordered  to  Vancouver  because  it  was  deemed 
expedient  for  the  service  that  he  should  go  there. 

"2.  It  has  never  been  the  practice  of  the  War  Department  ...  to  furnish 
copies  of  changes  affecting  the  capacity  or  fidelity  of  its  officers  upon  which  no 
action  has  been  taken.  In  the  present  instance  it  is  not  deemed  compatible  with 
the  public  interests  to  make  any  further  answer  to  the  latter  branch  of  the 
inquiry  contained  in  said  resolution.  .  .  ." 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  April  7,  1864. 

What  are  the  facts  in  the  case  of  William  T.  Aud,  in  the  Carroll 
building  prison  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

[290] 


APRIL      8,      1864 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  236.  Stan- 
ton  replied  on  April  8  that  William  T.  Aud  had  been  found  guilty  on  charges 
of  being  in  business  of  conducting  persons  through  Federal  lines  by  rowing  them 
across  the  Potomac,  but  that  "on  application  in  his  behalf  one  half  of  his  sen- 
tence was  remitted  yesterday."  (DLC-RTL) .  Montgomery  Blair  wrote  on  April 
7  introducing  "Miss  Lavania  Beers  who  is  sister-in-law  of  Wm  T  Aud.  ...  I 
have  very  little  knowledge  of  Mr.  Aud.  ...  I  know  however  that  he  has 
voted  with  the  Union  party.  .  .  ."  (Ibid.). 


Form  Order  for  Release  of  Prisoners1 

April  8,  1864 

//  the  persons  whose  names  follow,  now  Prisoners  of 
War  at ?  shall  take  the  oath  of  De- 
cember 8,  1863,  and  be  discharged,,  we,  the  undersigned  Members 
of  Congress,  pledge  our  honor  that  they  will  keep  faith: 

Joseph  Henry  Crosster  Fort  Deleware 

John  B.  Talbott  Camp  Chase 

Jefferson  M  Booth  Camp  Chase 

William   E.   Wood  Camp  Morton 

John  Cohen  Camp  Douglas 

C.  D.  Nutter  Camp  Douglas 

J.  N.  Taylor  Fort  Deleware 

T.  M  Combs  Fort  Deleware 

Brutus  J.  Clay,  M.  C. 
W.  H  Randall  M.  C. 
Lu  Anderson  M.  C. 

Excepting  such  as  are  commissioned  officers,  let  the  above  named 
prisoner  [s]  be  discharged  on  the  conditions  stated 

April  8.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  D  and  AES,  IHi.  A  similar  document  of  this  date,  bearing  the  same  auto- 
graph endorsement  by  Lincoln,  was  submitted  by  members  of  congress  from 
Missouri  (RPB),  and  presumably  numerous  others  were  signed  by  Lincoln. 
The  printed  portions  of  the  document  are  reproduced  in  italic  type. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

If  consistent  with  the  public  interest,  I  shall  be  glad  for  the  within 
request  to  be  granted.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  8.  1864. 

1  AES,  MiU-Hi-Chase  Osborn  Papers.  See  Lincoln's  memorandum  of  July  29, 
1862.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  from  Mrs.  Hattie  Knight 
asking  that  her  sick  husband,  Robert  T.  Knight,  "shall  have  the  privilege  of 
selling  goods  at  the  Soldiers  Rest  in  Alexandria." 

[291] 


To  Gideon  Welles1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Navy  please  see  &  hear  Lieut.  Merry-man,  who  was 
raised  in  the  town  of  my  residence  A.  LINCOLN 

April  8.  1864 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Philip  R.  Davis,  Chicago,  Illinois.  Concerning  Lieutenant 
James  H.  Merryman,  see  Lincoln  to  Chase,  May  13,  1863. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

April  9,  1864 

Mr.  Buttz  wishes  to  return  to  Portsmouth.  I  will  not  force  him 
back  into  Gen.  Butler's  Department,  contrary  to  his  will;  but  I  will 
be  obliged  if  Gen.  Butler  will  hear  him  on  the  question  of  what  his 
future  conduct  will  be,  and  restore  him  if  he  shall  think  he  safely 
can.  A.  LINCOLN. 

April  9.  1864 

1  AES,  DLC-Butler  Papers.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  envelope 
endorsed  by  Edward  Bates:  "The  bearer,  Mr  Butts  of  Norfolk,  Va.,  begs  a  short 
interview,  upon  a  matter  of  the  greatest  importance  to  him. 

"Mr  Butts,  is  a  Pennsylvanian,  late  a  cavalry  officer.  Reputed  a  good  lawyer, 
and  stands  highly  recommended,  in  this  office  for  Dist:  Atty."  Charles  W.  Butts, 
a  lawyer  and  formerly  a  lieutenant  of  Company  I,  Eleventh  Pennsylvania  Cav- 
alry (resigned  October  28,  1863)  wrote  Attorney  General  Bates  on  March  19, 
1864,  protesting  Butler's  confiscation  orders,  specifically  the  seizure  of  the  estate 
of  John  W.  Williams  of  Portsmouth,  Virginia  (Private  and  Official  Corre- 
spondence of  Benjamin  F.  Butler 9  IV,  18). 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  examine  and  report  upon  this  case. 
April  9.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

i  AES,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln 
Material.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written,  on  an  envelope  containing  papers 
in  the  case  of  J.  V.  W.  Vandenburg  formerly  a  captain  in  the  One  Hundred 
Twenty-fifth  New  York  Volunteers,  convicted  of  presenting  false  accounts  and 
vouchers,  and  fined  $1,000.  Holt's  report  of  April  21,  1864,  gave  the  opinion 
that  the  case  against  Vandenburg  was  faulty  and  recommended  pardon.  An 
opinion  by  Attorney  General  Bates,  May  18,  1864,  concurred  that  "the  offence 
is  not  a  felony"  On  May  9,  Lincoln  endorsed  "Pardon.  A.  Lincoln." 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Judge  Advocate  General  please  report  on  this  case. 
April  9.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

Application  denied.         A.  LINCOLN 
April  27,  1864. 

[292] 


APRIL      11,      1864 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  LL  1670.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  record  of  Nathan  W.  Stout,  late  pilot  of  the 
steamer  Fulton,  dismissed  for  intoxication.  Holt  reported  that  Stout  should  not 
be  relieved  of  sentence. 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major  General  Meade  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  the  Potomac  Washington,  April  9.  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  private  William  Collins,  Co.  B.  6gth.  N.Y. 
Vols.  Irish  Brigade,  and  class  him  with  other  suspended  cases. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Joseph  L.  Block,  Chicago,  Illinois.  See  further,  Lincoln  to 
Meade,  April  17,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Let  the  order  in  this  case  be  modified  as  within  requested. 

April  9,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  appears  on  a  letter  of  Reverend  John  A. 
Spooner,  Baltimore,  to  Montgomery  Blair,  April  7,  1864.  Because  of  poor 
health,  Spooner  had  attempted  to  resign  as  hospital  chaplain  at  Point  Lookout, 
but  had  been  dismissed  instead.  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  144,  April  11,  1864,  di- 
rected that  "So  much  of  ...  Special  Orders,  No.  99,  of  March  ist,  1864,  from 
this  Office,  as  dismissed  Hospital  Chaplain  John  A.  Spooner,  U.S.  Army,  for 
absence  without  proper  authority,  is  hereby  revoked,  and  his  resignation  has 
been  accepted  by  the  President,  to  take  effect  February  8th,  1864." 

To  Charles  Sumner1 

Will  Senator  Sumner  please  call  and  see  me  this  morning? 
April  9.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

251.  F.  Street 

1  ALS,  owned  by  Dale  Carnegie,  New  York  City. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Major  General  Butler  War  Department, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  D.C.,  April  11  1864. 

Mrs.  L.  is  so  unwell  that  I  now  think  we  will  not  make  the  con- 
templated trip  this  week.  Will  notify  you  in  time.  Will  probably 
get  a  Boat  here,  but  will  accept  yours  if  necessary.  Thanks  for  your 
kind  interest  in  the  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

[293] 


APRIL      11,      1864 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  24.  See  Lincoln  to  But- 
ler, April  7,  supra.  On  April  10  Butler  telegraphed,  "Shall  I  send  a  boat  for 
yourself  and  party?  If  not  please  telegraph  me  when  you  leave,  or  will  arrive" 
(DLC-RTL). 

Endorsement  Concerning  John  Ehler1 

They  say  that  by  the  destruction  of  a  bridge  this  boy  has  been 

unable  to  pass  on  this.  Might  it  not  be  renewed  for  the  little  fellow.? 

April  11.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  IHi.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  the  back  of  an  official  War 
Department  pass  issued  on  April  9,  1864,  to  "John  Ehler,  a  boy  to  years  old, 
to  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  to  join  Emery  R.  Simons,  6ist.  N.Y.  Veteran  Vols." 
See  also  Lincoln's  pass  for  John  Ehler,  September  13,  infra. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Judge  Advocate  General  April  11.  1864. 

It  is  understood  that  in  the  early  part  of  1862,  or  latter  part  of 
1861,  Francis  G.  Young  was  tried  and  dismissed  by  a  Court  Martial 
sitting  at  Poolesville  Md.  Col.  Devens2  was  President  of  the  Court. 
What  I  want  is  the  record  of  the  trial,  &  if  you  can  find  it  for  me 
I  shall  be  obliged  Yours  truly  A. 


1  ALS,  owned  by  Joseph  Holt  Rose,   Pasadena,   California.    See   Lincoln  to 
McClellan,  December  6,  1861,  supra.  No  reply  has  been  discovered. 

2  Colonel  Charles  Devens  (?)  of  the  Fifteenth  Massachusetts  Infantry. 

Order  for  Discharge  of  Prisoners1 

Excepting  commissioned  officers,  let  the  within  named  prisoners  be 
discharged  on  the  conditions  stated.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  11.  1864. 

1  AES,  ICU.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  form  order  for  discharge 
of  forty-five  prisoners  as  listed  and  vouched  for  by  members  of  congress  from 
Missouri.  See  similar  order,  April  8,  supra. 

To  William  H.  Seward1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Hon.  W.  H.  Seward  War  Department, 

Astor-House  Washington,  B.C., 

New-York.  ^  April  11,  6/15  PM.  1864. 

Nothing  of  importance  since  you  left.          A.  LINCOLN 
i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  25. 

[294] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

April  11,  1864 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War,  please  see  L.  H.  Putnam,  whom  you  will  find  a 
very  intelligent  colored  man;  and  who  wishes  to  talk  about  our 
colored  forces,  their  organization,  &c  A.  LINCOLN. 

April  11,  1864. 

iALS-F,  Brooklyn  Daily  Eagle,  February  12,  1928.  L.  H.  Putnam  has  not 
been  identified. 


To  Miss  Steele1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
My  Dear  Miss  Steele  April  11,  1864. 

I  cannot  refuse  you  so  slight  a  favor  for  so  good  a  purpose.  Yours 
very  truly  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  LS,  RPAB-Hawkins  Collection.  Miss  Steele  has  not  been  identified,  but  may 
have  been  the  same  Ella  Steele  to  whom  Lincoln  sent  his  autograph  on  Febru- 
ary 20,  1865,  infra. 


To  John  C.  Underwood1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  April  11.  1864. 

If  Judge  John  C.  Underwood  will  say  in  writing  on  this  sheet  that 
he  personally  knows  Mrs.  Keenan,  and  that  he  desires  her  &  her 
little  nephew  to  pass  our  lines  and  go  to  her  father  in  Rockingham, 
Va,  I  will  direct  a  pass  to  be  given  her  accordingly. 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DLC-RTL.  John  C.  Underwood,  judge  of  the  U.S.  District  Court  of 
Virginia  at  Alexandria,  answered  on  the  bottom  of  the  page:  "I  have  long 
known  Mrs  Keenan  her  father  husband  &  children  I  highly  esteem  her  for 
her  energy  integrity  &  private  virtues  &  since  duty  calls  her  to  guide  &  guard 
her  now  fatherless  children  who  are  with  her  father  in  Rockingham  Co.  Va.  I 
request  for  her  &  her  little  nephew  a  pass  to  that  place."  Mrs.  Keenan  has  not 
been  further  identified. 


To  Whom  It  May  Concern1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Whom  it  may  concern  Washington,  April  11.  1864. 

I  know  nothing  on  the  subject  of  the  attached  letter,  except  as 
therein  stated.  Neither  do  I  personally  know  Mrs.  Hunt.  She  has, 

[295] 


APRIL      12,      1864 

however,  from  the  beginning  of  the  war,  been  constantly  repre- 
sented to  me  as  an  open,  and  somewhat  influential  friend  of  the 
Union.  It  has  been  said  to  me,  (I  know  not  whether  truly)  that  her 
husband  is  in  the  rebel  army,  that  she  avows  her  purpose  to  not 
live  with  him  again,  and  that  she  refused  to  see  him  when  she  had 
an  opportunity  during  one  of  John  Morgan's  raids  into  Kentucky. 
I  would  not  offer  her,  or  any  wife,  a  temptation  to  a  permanent 
separation  from  her  husband;  but  if  she  shall  avow  that  her  mind 
is  already,  independently  and  fully  made  up  to  such  separation,  I 
shall  be  glad  for  the  property  sought  by  her  letter,  to  be  delivered 
to  her,  upon  her  taking  the  oath  of  December  8,  1863. 

A.  LINCOLTST 

i  ALS,  ORB;  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  Mrs.  Sallie  Ward  Hunt,  wife  of  Daniel  Hunt, 
wrote  Mrs.  Lincoln  on  March  31,  1864,  requesting  her  influence  in  obtaining 
furniture  and  personal  effects  held  by  authorities  in  New  Orleans  (ALS,  ORB). 


To  Alexander  II1 

April  12,  1864 
Abraham  Lincoln 

President  of  the  United  States  of  America. 
To  His  Majesty  Alexander  II. 

Emperor  and  Autocrat  of  all  the  Russias 

&c.  &c.  &c. 

Great  and  Good  Friend:  I  have  received  the  letter  which  Your 
Imperial  Majesty  was  pleased  to  address  to  me  on  the  26th.  (14)  of 
January  last,  announcing  the  birth  of  the  22d  ( loth)  of  that  month 
of  a  son  who  has  received  the  name  of  Pierre  to  Madame  the  Grand 
Duchess  Alexandra  Petrovna,  Spouse  of  Your  Imperial  Majestys 
well  beloved  brother  His  Imperial  Highness  Monseigneur  the 
Grand  Duke  Nicolas  Nicolaewitch. 

Your  Majesty  does  but  justice  to  my  sentiments  in  the  conviction 
which  you  have  been  pleased  to  express  that  I  will  take,  in  an  event 
so  satisfactory  to  you,  and  Your  Imperial  House  the  same  interest 
which  Your  Majesty  is  ever  inclined  to  take  in  all  that  concerns 
the  prosperity  of  the  United  States,  and  I  beg  Your  Majesty  to  ac- 
cept my  sincere  congratulations  upon  the  occasion:  And  so  I  rec- 
ommend Your  Majesty's  Imperial  Family  to  the  protection  of  the 
Almighty.  Your  Good  Friend  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington,  12th  April  1864. 
By  the  President 

F.  H.  SEWARD.  Acting  Secretary  of  State. 

[296] 


APRIL      12,      1864 

1  Copy,  DNA  FS  RG  59,  Communications  to  Foreign  Sovereigns  and  States, 
III,  2t8-ig. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion  Washington,  DC. 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  April  12.  1864 

I  am  pressed  to  get  from  Libby,  by  special  exchange,  Jacob  C. 
Hagenbuch  i  Lieut.  Co.  H.  67.  Penn.  Vols.  Please  do  it,  if  you  can, 
without  detriment  or  embarrassment.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  27.  Butler  replied  on 
the  same  day  that  he  would  "endeavor  to  effect  the  proposed  exchange."  (DLC- 
Butler  Papers).  The  roster  of  the  Sixty-seventh  Pennsylvania  Volunteers  lists 
Jacob  C.  Hagenbuch  as  mustered  out  at  the  expiration  of  his  term  on  March  24, 
1865. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  Gen.  Butler  Executive  Mansion, 

Fort-Monroe,  Va  Washington,  April  12.  1864. 

I  am  appealed  to  in  behalf  of  Charles  Crumblin  [Crumpton] 
said  to  be  under  sentence  of  death,  to  be  executed  at  Norfolk  to- 
morrow. Please  ascertain  whether  there  is  any  ground  for  a  pardon, 
or  even  a  respite,  and  answer  me.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  28.  Butler  replied  on  the 
same  day: 

"Telegram  recieved.  In  regard  to  the  question  of  pardon  or  respite  I  send  the 
extract  from  the  General  Order  which  approved  the  sentence  to  -wit 

"  'In  the  case  of  Private  Charles  Crumpton  Co.  G.  loth,  regt  New  Hampshire 
Vols,  it  appearing  that  the  accused  enlisted  as  a  substitute  and  recieved  his 
bounty  in  payment  therefor,  then  deliberately  procured  a  rebel  uniform  with 
which  to  aid  him  in  deserting  and  did  desert  from  his  regiment  and  was  de- 
tected in  the  act,  and  when  detected  attempted  to  pass  himself  off  as  a  rebel  de- 
serter, no  excuse  is  left  for  his  acts  and  indeed  none  is  attempted  to  be  given. 
He  has  been  tried  before  a  General  Court  Martial  and  upon  satisfactory  evi- 
dence although  defended  by  counsel  of  his  own  selection  he  has  been  found 
guilty.  The  proceedings  findings  and  sentence  are  therefore  approved  &  con- 
firmed' 

"I  know  nothing  which  can  by  possibility  be  urged  in  Crumptons  favor  ex- 
cept that  he  was  defended  by  one  Butts  a  lawyer  who  neglected  his  case,  but  I 
examined  the  record  and  came  to  the  result  above  stated 

"Large  numbers  of  the  New  Hampshire  substitutes  have  deserted  from  York- 
town  yesterday  and  to  day — some  have  gone  to  the  enemy,  some  are  lurking 
in  swamps  and  some  are  attempting  to  get  to  Baltimore  they  are  from  the 
regiments  lately  at  Point  Lookout  which  I  have  had  to  remove  from  thence 
because  I  found  them  colluding  with  the  prisoners  and  escaping.  Three  (3) 
having  siezed  a  boat  and  carried  off  five  (5)  prisoners  Those  that  we  catch 
are  being  tried  by  Court  Martial  and  I  believe  it  will  be  necessary  to  execute 
quite  a  number  of  them."  (DLC-Butler  Papers). 

See  Lincoln  to  Butler,  April  13,  infra. 

[297] 


To  John  A.  Dix1 

Major  General  Dix.  Executive  Mansion, 

New  York  City.  Washington,  April  12,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence,  of  William  H.  Gibney,  7th 
N.Y.  Heavy  Artillery,  until  further  orders.  A.  LINCOLN. 

Maj:  Eckert. 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch         JNO.  G.  NICOLAY     Priv:  Sec: 

i  D,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  26.  Nicolay  signed  both  "A. 
Lincoln"  and  his  own  signature.  Simeon  Draper  of  New  York  City  wrote  Lin- 
coln on  April  12  asking  clemency  for  William  Gibney,  sentenced  for  desertion. 
Gibney  remained  in  solitary  confinement  until  June  22,  when  Lincoln  referred 
to  Stanton  Gibney 's  request  to  be  released  from  heavy  irons  to  work  (DNA 
WR  RG  107,  Secretary  of  War,  Letters  Received,  P  375,  returned  to  the  presi- 
dent, July  8,  1864).  No  further  record  of  Lincoln's  action  has  been  found. 

To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington  D.C.  April  13.  1864 

Yours  in  regard  to  Charles  Crumpton  received.  I  have  no  more 
to  say  in  the  case.  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  29.  See  note  to  Lincoln's 
telegram  of  April  12,  supra.  No  record  of  Lincoln's  further  action  has  been 
found,  but  Crumpton  seems  not  to  have  been  executed.  The  roster  of  the  Tenth 
New  Hampshire  Volunteers  lists  him  as  discharged  on  July  12,  1865,  at  Con- 
cord, New  Hampshire. 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

Pardon — proof  being  insufficient,  except  for  short  absence  without 
leave.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  14.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  NN  1204.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  John  C.  Clevenger,  First 
New  Jersey  Cavalry,  sentenced  to  two  years'  imprisonment  for  absence  without 
leave  and  for  forgery.  This  is  one  of  sixty-seven  cases  reviewed  by  Lincoln  on 
April  14.  His  endorsements  are  routine  pardons,  commutations,  remissions,  or 
approvals  of  sentence  with  the  exception  of  the  two  reproduced. 


To  Joseph  Holt1 

This  man  is  pardoned,  and  hereby  ordered  to  be  discharged  from 
the  service.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  14.  1864 

[298] 


APRIL      l69      1864 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  761.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Private  Patrick  Murphy, 
Company  E,  Second  California  Volunteers,  sentenced  to  be  shot  for  desertion 
and  violation  of  the  Twenty-Third  Article  of  War.  The  court  asked  clemency, 
as  the  accused  was  insane. 


To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  April  15,  1864 

I  herewith  lay  before  the  Senate,  for  its  constitutional  action 
thereon,  a  supplemental  treaty  negotiated  on  the  12th  of  April, 
1864,  with  the  Red  Lake  and  Pembina  bands  of  Chippewa  Indians. 
A  report  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Interior  of  this  date  and  a  com- 
munication from  the  Acting  Commissioner  of  Indian  Affairs  ac- 
company the  treaty.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN". 
Washington  City,  April  15,  1864. 

1  Executive  Journal,  XIII,  490.  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  the  Senate, 
January  8,  supra.  The  supplemental  treaty  was  ratified  by  the  Senate  on  April 
21,  1864. 


To  James  B.  Fry1 

Executive  Mansion     April  16.  1864 

The  within  paper  was  written  at  my  suggestion  by  gentlemen  rep- 
resenting Philadelphia,  to  present  their  views  of  the  subject  em- 
braced and  to  be  signed  by  me  if  I  could  approve  it.  I  am  not 
prepared  to  assent  to  all  that  it  asks  at  present,  but  I  do  order  that 
the  Philadelphia  quotas  be  adjusted  for  the  calls  of  1863  and  1864 
already  made,  upon  the  basis  that  that  City  was  under  no  deficit 
on  November  3d.  1862,  and  allowing  full  credits  for  all  since  that 
date;  and  further  that  all  other  questions  presented  on  said  paper 
are  left  open  for  future  adjustment.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ES,  IHi;  ADf,  DLC-RTL.  The  autograph  draft  is  undated  and  reads:  "The 
within  paper  was  written  at  my  suggestion,  by  gentlemen  representing  Phila- 
delphia, to  present  their  views  of  the  subject  embraced,  &  to  be  signed  by  me, 
if  I  could  approve  it.  I  can  not  sign  it,  but  order  for  the  present,  that  the  Phila- 
delphia quotas  be  adjusted  for  the  calls  of  1863  &  1864  already  made,  upon  the 
basis  that  she  was  under  no  deficit  on  Nov.  3,  1862,  and  allowing  full  credits 
for  all  since  that  date;  and  further  that  all  other  questions  presented  on  said 
paper  are  left  open  for  further  adjustment." 

The  endorsement  signed  by  Lincoln  accompanies  the  following  communica- 
tion dated  April  15,  1864,  and  addressed  to  Colonel  James  B.  Fry: 

"Finding  that  the  quotas  assigned  to  the  different  Congressional  Districts  of 
the  State  of  Pennsylvania,  under  the  calls  for  men  of  the  years  1863  &  1864,  are 
all  affected  by  distributed  portions  of  a  supposed  deficiency  of  that  state,  under 
calls  of  the  years  1861  &  1862,  when  no  accounts  were  kept  by  your  department 

[299] 


APRIL      l65      1864 

with.  Congressional  Districts,  but  only  with  the  state  at  large;  and  evidence 
having  been  adduced  before  me  tending  to  shew  that  persons  acting  officially, 
and  by  authority  from  the  Governor  of  that  state,  did,  on  November  sd.  1862, 
make  a  report  to  him,  that,  so  far  as  the  City  of  Philadelphia  was  concerned, 
she  had  complied  with  all  calls  upon  her  up  to  that  time;  which  report  was  ac- 
cepted by  said  Governor,  who,  acting  thereupon,  at  once  ordered  that  no  draft 
should  take  place  in  said  City;  &  now,  that  we  have  begun  to  keep  accounts 
with  Congressional  Districts,  and  even  smaller  localities,  I  am  disposed  to  regard 
tHis  report,  so  accepted  and  acted  upon  by  said  Governor,  as  conclusive  in  favor 
of  said  City,  upon  the  questions  therein  decided.  You  will  please  direct  the 
officers  of  your  Bureau  of  Enrolment  to  act  upon  this  report  as  follows:  viz. 

"ist.  To  strike  out  all  charge  against  said  City  of  Philadelphia,  as  for  a  defi- 
ciency under  the  calls  of  1861  &  1862. 

"ad.  To  give  said  City  the  benefit  of  any  credit  that  may  result  to  her,  under 
the  present  practice  of  your  department  to  reduce  all  charges  <fo  credits  to 
terms  of  three  years  men,  from  the  facts  appearing  in  said  report  and  the  ac- 
companying documents,  shewing  that  she  furnished  three  years  men  who,  in 
said  report,  are  made  to  stand  no  better  than  nine  months  men  furnished  by 
other  parts  of  the  state. 

"3d.  That  credit  be  further  given  to  said  City  for  all  men  mustered  into  the 
service  from  November  sd.  1862,  the  date  at  which  her  quotas  were  declared 
filled  by  the  proper  officers,  under  their  existing  regulations,  until  the  date 
when  accounts  were  opened  by  your  Bureau  with  the  several  Congressional 
Districts 

"4th.  That  any  credits,  resulting  from  these  orders,  for  surplus  troops  fur- 
nished under  the  calls  of  1861  &  1862,  shall  be  a  balance  to  the  credit  of  Phila- 
delphia under  the  calls  of  1863  &  1864." 


To  Henry  W.  Halleck1 

April  16,  1864 
Let  it  be  done.          A.  LINCOLN. 

1  OR,  I,  XXXIV,  III,  178.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  despatch 
from  General  Grant  to  Halleck:  "Please  ask  the  President  to  authorize  the 
transfer  of  Fort  Smith  and  the  Indian  Territory  to  the  Department  of  Arkansas. 
There  is  every  reason  why  this  Territory  and  the  State  of  Arkansas  should  be 
under  one  man,  and  that  man  in  the  field.  In  case  this  change  is  made  I  wish 
General  Blunt  ordered  back  to  report  to  General  Curtis."  AGO  General  Orders 
No.  ±64,  April  17,  1864,  ordered  the  transfer  and  also  Blunt  to  report  to  Curtis. 


To  John  P.  Usher1 

Let  the  lands  be  withheld  from  sale  as  recommended. 
April  16.  1864  A. 


l  ES,  DNA  NR  RG  75,  Office  of  Indian  Affairs,  Executive  Order  File.  Lin- 
coln's endorsement  is  written  on  a  letter  of  William  P  Dole  to  Usher,  April  12, 
1864,  concurring  in  recommendations  of  an  enclosed  letter  from  D.  C.  Leach, 
agent  of  the  Mackinac  Indian  Agency,  Detroit,  April  5,  1864,  that  certain  pub- 
lic lands  be  withdrawn  from  sale  and  added  to  the  Little  Traverse  Indian  Res- 
ervation. 

[300] 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington,  April  17,  1864. 

Private  William  Collins  of  Company  B,  of  the  Sixty-ninth  New 
York  Volunteers,  has  been  convicted  of  desertion,  and  execution 
suspended  as  in  numerous  other  cases.  Now  Captain  O'Neill,  com- 
manding the  regiment,  and  nearly  all  its  other  regimental  and 
company  officers,  petition  for  his  full  pardon  and  restoration  to  his 
company.  Is  there  any  good  objection?  A. 


1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  422.  See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  April  9,  supra.  No  reply 
or  further  reference  has  been  located.  Captain  Bernard  S.  O'Neill  of  the  Sixty- 
ninth  New  York  Volunteers  was  killed  at  Petersburg,  Virginia,  June  16,  1864. 

Address  at  Sanitary  Fair,  Baltimore,  Maryland1 

April  18,  1864 

Ladies  and  Gentlemen  —  Calling  to  mind  that  we  are  in  Balti- 
more, we  can  not  fail  to  note  that  the  world  moves.  Looking  upon 
these  many  people,  assembled  here,  to  serve,  as  they  best  may,  the 
soldiers  of  the  Union,  it  occurs  at  once  that  three  years  ago, 
the  same  soldiers  could  not  so  much  as  pass  through  Baltimore.  The 
change  from  then  till  now,  is  both  great,  and  gratifying.  Blessings 
on  the  brave  men  who  have  wrought  the  change,  and  the  fair 
women  who  strive  to  reward  them  for  it. 

But  Baltimore  suggests  more  than  could  happen  within  Balti- 
more. The  change  within  Baltimore  is  part  only  of  a  far  wider 
change.  When  the  war  began,  three  years  ago,  neither  party,  nor 
any  man,  expected  it  would  last  till  now.  Each  looked  for  the  end, 
in  some  way,  long  ere  to-day.  Neither  did  any  anticipate  that  do- 
mestic slavery  would  be  much  affected  by  the  war.  But  here  we 
are;  the  war  has  not  ended,  and  slavery  has  been  much  affected  — 
how  much  needs  not  now  to  be  recounted.  So  true  is  it  that  man 
proposes,  and  God  disposes. 

But  we  can  see  the  past,  though  we  may  not  claim  to  have  di- 
rected it;  and  seeing  it,  in  this  case,  we  feel  more  hopeful  and  con- 
fident for  the  future. 

The  world  has  never  had  a  good  definition  of  the  word  liberty, 
and  the  American  people,  just  now,  are  much  in  want  of  one.  We 
all  declare  for  liberty;  but  in  using  the  same  word  we  do  not  all 
mean  the  same  thing.  With  some  the  word  liberty  may  mean  for 
each  man  to  do  as  he  pleases  with  himself,  and  the  product  of  his 
labor;  while  with  others  the  same  word  may  mean  for  some  men 
to  do  as  they  please  with  other  men,  and  the  product  of  other  men's 

[301] 


APRIL      l8,      1864 

labor.  Here  are  two,  not  only  different,  but  incompatable  things, 
called  by  the  same  name — liberty.  And  it  follows  that  each  of  the 
things  is,  by  the  respective  parties,  called  by  two  different  and  in- 
compatable  names — liberty  and  tyranny. 

The  shepherd  drives  the  wolf  from  the  sheep's  throat,  for  which 
the  sheep  thanks  the  shepherd  as  a  liberator,  while  the  wolf  de- 
nounces him  for  the  same  act  as  the  destroyer  of  liberty,  especially 
as  the  sheep  was  a  black  one.  Plainly  the  sheep  and  the  wolf  are 
not  agreed  upon  a  definition  of  the  word  liberty;  and  precisely  the 
same  difference  prevails  to-day  among  us  human  creatures,  even 
in  the  North,  and  all  professing  to  love  liberty.  Hence  we  behold 
the  processes  by  which  thousands  are  daily  passing  from  under  the 
yoke  of  bondage,  hailed  by  some  as  the  advance  of  liberty,  and  be- 
wailed by  others  as  the  destruction  of  all  liberty.  Recently,  as  it 
seems,  the  people  of  Maryland  have  been  doing  something  to  de- 
fine liberty;  and  thanks  to  them  that,  in  what  they  have  done,  the 
wolf's  dictionary,  has  been  repudiated. 

It  is  not  very  becoming  for  one  in  my  position  to  make  speeches 
at  great  length;  but  there  is  another  subject  upon  which  I  feel  that 
I  ought  to  say  a  word.  A  painful  rumor,  true  I  fear,  has  reached 
us  of  the  massacre,  by  the  rebel  forces,  at  Fort  Pillow,  in  the  West 
end  of  Tennessee,  on  the  Mississippi  river,  of  some  three  hundred 
colored  soldiers  and  white  officers,  who  had  just  been  overpowered 
by  their  assailants.2  There  seems  to  be  some  anxiety  in  the  public 
mind  whether  the  government  is  doing  it's  duty  to  the  colored 
soldier,  and  to  the  service,  at  this  point.  At  the  beginning  of  the 
war,  and  for  some  time,  the  use  of  colored  troops  was  not  contem- 
plated; and  how  the  change  of  purpose  was  wrought,  I  will  not 
now  take  time  to  explain.  Upon  a  clear  conviction  of  duty  I  re- 
solved to  turn  that  element  of  strength  to  account;  and  I  am  re- 
sponsible for  it  to  the  American  people,  to  the  Christian  world,  to 
history,  and  on  my  final  account  to  God.  Having  determined  to 
use  the  negro  as  a  soldier,  there  is  no  way  but  to  give  him  all  the 
protection  given  to  any  other  soldier.  The  difficulty  is  not  in  stating 
the  principle,  but  in  practically  applying  it.  It  is  a  mistake  to  sup- 
pose the  government  is  indiffe[re]nt  to  this  matter,  or  is  not  doing 
the  best  it  can  in  regard  to  it.  We  do  not  to-day  know  that  a  col- 
ored soldier,  or  white  officer  commanding  colored  soldiers,  has  been 
massacred  by  the  rebels  when  made  a  prisoner.  We  fear  it,  believe 
it,  I  may  say,  but  we  do  not  know  it.  To  take  the  life  of  one  of  their 
prisoners,  on  the  assumption  that  they  murder  ours,  when  it  is 
short  of  certainty  that  they  do  murder  ours,  might  be  too  serious, 
too  cruel  a  mistake.  We  are  having  the  Fort-Pillow  affair  thorough- 

[302] 


APRIL      l85      1864 

ly  investigated;  and  such  investigation  will  probably  show  con- 
clusively how  the  truth  is.  If,  after  all  that  has  been  said,  it  shall 
turn  out  that  there  has  been  no  massacre  at  Fort-Pillow,  it  will  be 
almost  safe  to  say  there  has  been  none,  and  will  be  none  elsewhere. 
If  there  has  been  the  massacre  of  three  hundred  there,  or  even  the 
tenth  part  of  three  hundred,  it  will  be  conclusively  proved;  and 
being  so  proved,  the  retribution  shall  as  surely  come.  It  will  be 
matter  of  grave  consideration  in  what  exact  course  to  apply  the 
retribution;  but  in  the  supposed  case,  it  must  come. 

1  AD,  The  Rosenbach  Company,  Philadelphia  and  New  York.  A  preliminary 
draft  (infra)  of  the  opening  paragraph  of  this  address  is  preserved  in  the  Lin- 
coln Papers. 

2  See  Lincoln's  communication  to  cabinet  members  and  note,  May  3,  infra. 

Draft  of  Address  for  Sanitary  Fair  at  Baltimore1 

[c.  April  18,  1864] 

Mr.  Webster  once  stated  the  proposition  that  a  President  could  not 
be  so  applauded,  and  ministered  unto,  when  his  term  of  office,  and 
with  it,  his  power  to  confer  favors,  drew  near  to  it's  close,  as  he  had 
been  in  the  hey-day  of  his  inaugeration.  To  illustrate  this,  he  said: 
"Politicians — office-seekers — are  not  sun-flowers;  they  do  not  turn 
upon  their  god  when  he  sets,  the  same  look  they  gave  when  he 
rose."  This  may  be  a  general  truth;  but,  to  my  personal  knowledge 
it  is  not  particularly  true  in  Baltimore.  For  intance,  on  the  22nd. 
or  23rd.  of  February  1861  (so  near  the  end  of  one  and  the  begin- 
ning of  the  other,  as  to  be  doubtful  which)  I  passed  through 
Baltimore,  rich  with  honorable  and  fat  offices,  soon  to  be  dispensed, 
and  not  one  hand  reached  forth  to  greet  me,  not  one  voice  broke 
the  stillness  to  cheer  me.  Now,  three  years  having  past,  and  offices 
having  passed  away,  Baltimore  marks  my  coming,  and  cheers  me 
when  I  come.  Traitorous  malice  has  sought  to  wrong  Baltimore 
herein,  ascribing  to  one  cause  what  is  justly  due  to  another.  For  in- 
stance the  Richmond,2  alluding  to  that  passage  through  Baltimore, 
said:  "We  have  no  fear  of  any  bold  action  by  the  federal  govern- 
ment; we  remember  Baltimore,  and  our  faith  is  unwavering  in 
Lincoln's  cowardice"  Now  this  is  hugely  unjust  to  Baltimore.  I 
take  it  to  be  unquestionable  that  what  happened  here  three  years 
ago,  and  what  happens  here  now,  was  contempt  of  office  then,  and 
is  purely  appreciation  of  merit  now. 

1  AD,  DLC-RTL.  This  fragment  would  seem  logically  to  have  been  Lincoln's 
opening  paragraph  for  the  Baltimore  address,  abandoned  for  obvious  reasons, 
both  of  politics  and  sentiment. 

2  Lincoln  probably  intended  to  insert  here  the  name  of  a  newspaper. 

[303] 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Hon.  Attorney  General  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  April  18,  1864. 

Hon  Ebenezer  Dumont  is  very  desirous  that  the  fine  of  five  hun- 
dred dollars  assessed  in  the  U.S.  District  Court  of  Indiana,  against 
John  Caldwell,  for  aiding  a  rescue,  be  remitted,  said  Caldwell  hav- 
ing died,  and  the  fine  only  operating  upon  his  destitute  family.  If 
it  be  your  opinion  that  the  President  has  the  legal  power  so  to  remit, 
please  prepare  the  papers,  or  what  is  necessary  to  have  it  legally 
done.  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1ALS,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  516.  See  Lincoln  to  Bates, 
April  4,  supra.  Ebenezer  Dumont  was  U.S.  representative  from  Indiana. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  send  nomination  for  Thomas  A.  Osborne, 
in  place  of  McDowell  resigned.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  18.  1864. 

i  AES,  DNA  GE  RG  60,  Papers  of  Attorney  General,  Segregated  Lincoln  Ma- 
terial. Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  page  torn  from  a  letter  which  has 
not  been  found.  Thomas  A.  Osborne's  appointment  as  U.S.  marshal  for  Kansas, 
replacing  James  L.  McDowell,  was  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on  April  20,  1864. 


To  Edward  Bates1 

Attorney  General  please  examine  &  report  upon  this  case. 
April  18,  1864  A.  LINGO  LINT 

1  AES,  DNA  RG  204,  U.S.  Pardon  Attorney,  A  530,  Lincoln's  endorsement  is 
written  on  a  petition,  November  17,  1863,  for  pardon  of  George  Ward,  signed 
by  jurors  who  convicted  him  of  highway  robbery  in  the  District  of  Columbia. 
No  further  reference  has  been  found. 


To  Paul  Frank1 

Col.  Paul  Frank 

of  N.Y.  52nd.  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac  Washington,  April  18.  1864. 

Is  there,  or  has  there  been  a  man  in  your  Regiment  by  the  name 
of  Cornelius  Garvin;?  and  if  so,  answer  me  as  far  as  you  know, 
where  he  now  is.  A.  LIISTCOLTST 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  30.  No  reply  or  further 
reference  has  been  located. 

[304] 


To  Stephen  Cabot1 

Officer  in  Military  command,  Executive  Mansion 

at  Fort- Warren.  Washington, 

Boston-Harbor,  Mass.  April  20.  1864 

If  there  is  a  man  by  the  name  of  Charles  Carpenter,  under  sen- 
tence of  death  for  desertion,  at  Fort- Warren,  suspend  execution 
until  further  order,  and  send  the  record  of  his  trial.  If  sentenced  for 
any  other  offence,  telegraph  what  it  is,  and  when  he  is  to  be  exe- 
cuted. Answer  at  all  events.  A.  LINCOLN. 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  31.  No  reply  has  been 
discovered.  See  Lincoln's  telegrams  to  Cabot  and  to  Dix,  April  21,  infra, 

Endorsement1 

April  20,  1864 

If  the  officer  commanding  this  man's  regiment,  and  the  officer  com- 
manding his  company  will  write  on  this  paper  that  they  desire  him 
to  rejoin  his  regiment,  I  will  send  him  to  them.          A.  LINCOLN 
April  20,  1864 

1  Thomas  A.  Madigan,  A  Catalogue  of  Lincolniana  ( 1929) ,  p.  29.  According 
to  the  source,  this  endorsement  is  written  on  a  petition  for  pardon,  not  otherwise 
identified. 


Endorsement  Concerning  John  Oberteuffer1 

[c.  April  20,  1864] 

I  apprehend  the  re-organization  of  the  Militia  is  a  far  larger  job 
than  Lieut.  Col.  Oberteuffer  thinks.  I  could  not  enter  upon  it,  now 
when  I  have  not  half  time  enough  for  other  duties. 

1  American  Art  Association  Catalog  4221,  January  14-15,  1936,  No.  356.  Ac- 
cording to  the  source,  Lincoln's  endorsement  was  written  on  the  back  of  a  letter 
from  Lieutenant  Colonel  John  H.  Oberteuffer,  One  Hundred  Twelfth  Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers  (Second  Pennsylvania  Artillery),  April  20,  1864,  asking  an 
interview  for  the  purpose  of  presenting  a  plan  of  reorganizing  the  militia 
system. 


Pass  for  Miss  E.  Sharp1 

Allow  Miss  E.  Sharp,  an  invalid  to  pass  northward  through  our 
line  and  go  to  her  parents  in  Norfolk,  Va.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  20,  1864. 

i  Copy,  ISLA. 

[305] 


Note1 

Please  ascertain  whether  the  message  sent  by  me  yesterday  to 
Fort  Warren,  Boston-Harbor  was  delivered.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  21,  1864 

1ALS-P,  ISLA.  This  unaddressed  note  was  probably  sent  to  the  telegraph 
officer  in  the  War  Department.  See  Lincoln  to  Cabot,  April  20,  supra. 


To  Stephen  Cabot1 

Officer  in  Military  command  Executive  Mansion, 

at  Fort-  Warren  Washington, 

Boston-Harbor,  Mass.  April  21,  1864. 

The  order  I  sent  yesterday  in  regard  to  Charles  Carpenter  is 
hereby  withdrawn,  and  you  are  to  act  as  if  it  had  never  existed. 

A. 


i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  32.  See  Lincoln  to  Dix, 
infra. 


To  John  A.  Dix1 

Major  General  Dix  Executive  Mansion 

New-  York  Washington,  D.C.  April  21.  1864 

Yesterday  I  was  induced  to  telegraph  the  officer  in  military  com- 
mand at  Fort-  Warren,  Boston-Harbor,  Massachusetts,  suspending 
the  execution  of  Charles  Carpenter,  to  be  executed  to-morrow  for 
desertion.  Just  now,  on  reading  your  order  in  the  case,  I  telegraph 
the  same  officer  withdrawing  the  suspension,  and  leaving  the  case 
entirely  with  you.  The  man's  friends  are  pressing,  me,  but  I  refer 
them  to  you,  intending  to  take  no  further  action  myself. 

A. 


!ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  33.  The  New  York 
Tribune  (April  26,  1864)  reported  the  execution  of  Carpenter  and  his  accom- 
plice as  follows:  "Privates  Charles  Carpenter  and  Matthew  Riley  .  .  .  two  un- 
assigned  recruits  of  the  Vermont  volunteers,  suffered  the  extreme  penalty  of 
military  law  on  Friday  last  [April  22],  at  Fort  Warren,  Boston  Harbor,  for 
the  crime  of  desertion.  They  deserted  the  service  in  December,  1863.  Carpenter 
after  deserting,  disguised  himself,  and  commenced  business  as  a  bounty  or  sub- 
stitute broker.  .  .  .  They  were  convicted  and  sentenced  to  be  shot  .  .  .  before 
a  general  court  martial  that  met  on  January  30  ...  which  sentence  was  ap- 
proved by  Gen.  Dix.  Maj.  Cabot  was  charged  with  the  execution  of  this 
order.  .  .  ." 

[306] 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

April  21,  1864 

This  case  is  submitted  to  Gen.  Meade  to  be  disposed  of  by  him, 
under  the  recent  order2  upon  the  subject.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  21.  1864 

If  Gen.  Warren  has  recommended  the  discharge  of  this  man,  let 
him  be  discharged.  A.  LINCOLN 

Aug.  20.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1343.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsements are  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Private  William  T.  Evers 
(alias  William  J.  Evans),  Fourteenth  New  York  State  Militia,  sentenced  to  ten 
years'  imprisonment  for  desertion.  General  Meade  had  recommended  mitigation 
on   General    [Gouverneur   K.]    Warren's   recommendation,   but   for   unknown 
reasons   Lincoln's    first   endorsement   was    not   acted   upon.    Lincoln   reviewed 
seventy-two  court-martial  cases  on  April  21,  his  other  endorsements  of  this  date 
being  routine  approvals,  mitigations,  or  remissions  of  sentence. 

2  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  ±54,  April  21,  1864,  authorized  General  Meade  "to 
commute  the  sentence  of  death  to  imprisonment,   (with  forfeiture  of  all  pay 
due,)  in  the  Dry  Tortugas  Fort,  during  the  present  war,  or  to  make  such  other 
commutation  of  sentence  ...  as  in  each  case  justice,  and  the  benefit  of  the 
service,  may,  in  his  judgment,  require." 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

April  21,  1864 

Please  have  General  Halleck  make  the  proper  order  in  this  case. 
Hon.  Secretary  of  War.  A.  LINCOLIST. 

1  Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  House  Executive  Document  No.  80,  p. 
6.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on  a  letter  from  Francis  E  Blair,  Jr.,  April  20,  1864: 

"You  will  do  me  a  great  favor  by  giving  the  order  assigning  me  to  the  com- 
mand of  the  i7th  army  corps  immediately,  as  I  desire  to  leave  Washington  the 
next  Saturday  to  join  the  command.  I  also  request  the  assignment  of  Captain 
Andrew  J.  Alexander,  of  36.  regiment  U.S.  cavalry,  as  adjutant  general  of  the 
±7th  corps,  with  the  rank  of  lieutenant  colonel.  The  present  adjutant,  or  rather 
the  former  adjutant  .  .  .  has  been  retained  by  General  McPherson  as  adjutant 
general  of  the  department,  and  the  place  ...  is  necessarily  vacant. 

"I  also  request  the  appointment  of  George  A.  Maguire,  formerly  captain, 
3  ist  Missouri  volunteer  infantry,  as  major  and  aide-de-camp,  and  Lieutenant 
Logan  Tompkins,  2ist  Missouri  volunteer  infantry,  as  captain  and  aide-de-camp 
on  my  staff." 

See  Lincoln's  communications  to  Grant,  March  15,  supra,  and  to  the  House 
of  Representatives,  April  28,  infra. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir,  Washington,  April  21,  1864. 

The  accompanying  letter  &  papers  from  Gov.  Hahn,  came  to  me 
with  a  letter  of  his  to  me,  requesting  me  to  read  these  and  hand 

[307] 


APRIL     21,      1864 

them  to  you.  Shall  we  send  him  his  Louisiana  citizens  named? 
Yours  truly  A-  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  ORB.  The  accompanying  papers  have  not  been  found. 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  April  21,  1864. 

The  Governors  of  Ohio  Indiana,  Illinois,  and  Iowa  have  just 
been  with  me;  and  I  have  made  an  engagement  with  them  to  meet 
you,  Gen.  Halleck  and  myself  at  7.  P.M.  to-day,  at  this  room.  Please 
notify  Gen.  Halleck  &  you  and  he  attend.  Yours  truly 

A. 

1  ALS,  NHi.  See  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  April  23,  infra. 


To  Mason  Brayman1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Brig  Gen  Brayman.  War  Department, 

Comdg  Cairo.  Washington,  D.C.,  April  22nd.  1864. 

What  day  did  General  Corse  part  with  Gen  Banks? 

A.  LINCOLN 

1  D,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  34.  This  telegram  is  not 
in  Lincoln's  handwriting.  Brigadier  General  Brayman  had  telegraphed  Stanton 
on  April  21:  "General  [John  M.]  Corse,  who  was  sent  by  General  Sherman 
to  recall  General  A[ndrew]  J.  Smith's  command  from  Red  River,  has  re- 
turned. Banks  returned  to  Grand  Ecore,  badly  injured.  He  refused  to  return 
Smith's  command.  The  naval  force  is  caught  in  low  water,  with  shoals  above 
and  below."  (OR,  I,  XXXIV,  III,  244).  On  April  23,  Brayman  replied  to  Lin- 
coln's telegram:  "General  Corse  left  General  Banks  on  Monday  the  eleventh 
(11)  I  refer  you  to  my  dispatch  to  Mr  Stanton  yesterday  The  word  'severely 
injured'  referred  to  Genl  Banks  Army  &  not  him.  Genl  Corse  left  yesterday  & 
expected  to  be  in  Nashville  tomorrow"  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Albert  G.  Hodges1 

Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

A.  G.  Hodges,  Esq  War  Department, 

Frankfort,  Ky  Washington,  D.C.,  April  22.  1864. 

Did  you  receive  my  letter?          A.  LINCOLN 

l  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  35.  Hodges  replied  the 
same  day: 

[308] 


APRIL     22,      1864 

"Yours  of  the  4th  instant  -was  received  by  due  course  of  mail,  and  will  be 
given  to  the  people  of  Kentucky  at  the  proper  time.  I  have  shown  it  to  some  of 
the  prominent  union  men  .  .  .  and  I  have  met  but  one  as  yet  who  dissents  from 
your  reasoning  upon  the  subject  of  slavery. 

"It  is  with  feelings  of  profound  satisfaction  I  inform  you,  that  every  day  .  .  . 
I  have  been  receiving  information  of  your  steady  gam  upon  the  gratitude  and 
confidence  of  the  People  of  Kentucky.  .  .  .  My  deliberate  belief  is,  that  with 
your  name  before  the  people  of  our  State, — to  use  a  homely  phrase, — cye  shall 
"flax  them  out  handsomely9".  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


Order  for  Release  of  John  Connor1 

April  22,  1864 

Let  this  man,  John  Connor,  go  to  his  regiment;  and  upon  his  faith- 
fully serving  out  his  term,  making  up  lost  time,  or  until  he  is 
otherwise  honorably  discharged,  he  is  pardoned  for  said  desertion. 

April  22,   1864  A.  LINCOLN 

i  ADS,  NN.  Private  John  Connor,  First  District  of  Columbia  Infantry,  was 
ordered  released  by  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  158,  April  25,  1864.  Lincoln's 
order  is  explained  by  a  note  of  appreciation  from  Sister  Emerentiana  Bowden, 
Sisters  of  Charity,  St.  Matthew's  Academy,  April  23,  1864:  "Accept  our  heart- 
felt thanks  for  the  Pardon  of  John  Connor,  prisoner  in  Fort  Delaware,  which, 
at  our  instance,  you  were  so  kind  as  to  grant  yesterday.  You  will  ever  have 
the  prayers  &  blessing  of  the  afflicted  wife  &  four  almost  starving  children 
whom  you  have  relieved.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir  Washington,  April  22.  1864. 

I  infer,  by  Mr.  Smith's  pencil  note  that  there  may  be  some  spe- 
cial reason  for  not  discharging  the  five  prisoners  named  on  the 
accompanying  paper.  If  so,  lay  the  case  aside  till  I  see  you.  If  not, 
let  it  take  the  usual  course.  Yours  truly  A. 


1  ALS,  IHi.  The  verso  is  endorsed  by  Stanton,  referring  the  matter  to  Gen- 
eral Ethan  A.  Hitchcock.  The  accompanying  paper  has  not  been  found,  but  a 
letter  from  Green  Clay  Smith,  dated  April  19,  1864,  is  as  follows: 

"Permit  me  to  call  your  attention  to  the  paper  I  left  with  you  in  regard  to 
the  release  of  five  prisoners  —  signed  by  myself  &  Mr  Whaley.  The  Prisoners 
are  Hopkins,  Oldham,  Coulter,  Fretwell[?],  and  Emboy.  These  men  I  know, 
and  by  your  own  suggestion  some  time  ago  I  offered  this. 

"Now  as  to  my  signature  to  the  paper  presented  by  Messrs.  Grider  and  Hard- 
ing, it  was  alone  through  politeness  and  kindness  to  them,  without  any  pur- 
pose of  commiting  myself  to  them  or  their  applicants  —  I  desired  to  return  good 
for  evil. 

"Please  consider  my  personal  claim,  &  let  bearer  .  .  .  have  the  order  for 
them.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

[309] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  War,  please  see  &  hear  Hon.  Mr.  Granger,  of  the  last 
House  of  Representatives.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  22,  1864 

1 ALS,  DLC.  Bradley  F.  Granger  was  a  Democrat  of  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan. 


To  Benjamin  F.  Butler1 

Major  General  Butler  Executive  Mansion 

Fort-Monroe,  Va.  Washington,  April  23.  1864 

Senator  Ten-Eyck  is  very  anxious  to  have  a  special  exchange  of 
Capt.  Frank  J.  McLean,  of  9th.  Tennessee  Cavalry,  now,  or  lately, 
at  Johnson's  Island,  for  Capt.  T.  Ten-Eyck,  i8th.  U.S.  Infantry,  & 
now  at  Richmond.  I  would  like  to  have  it  done.  Can  it  be? 

A.  LINCOLN. 

*  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  37.  See  Lincoln's  pre- 
vious telegram  to  Butler,  March  19,  supra.  Butler's  reply  was  received  at  3:15 
P.M.:  "I  have  no  doubt  that  I  can  exchange  Capt.  McLean  .  .  .  for  Capt.  Ten 
Eycke.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 


To  Gustavus  V.  Fox1 

[April  23,  1864] 
I  do  not  think  I  can  go.  Shall  be  glad  if  Captain  Fox  does. 

A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Naval  Records,  I,  IX,  686.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  on  a  telegram  of  Ben- 
jamin F.  Butler  to  Fox,  April  23,  1864:  "I  think  you  can  do  more  good  to  the 
service  by  coming  here  for  twenty-four  hours  than  anywhere  else.  Please 
breakfast  with  me  to-morrow  morning  at  9  a.m.  Perhaps  you  can  bring  the 
President  with  you."  Major  John  Hay  accompanied  Fox. 


To  William  S.  Rosecrans1 

Major  General  Rosecrans  Executive  Mansion, 

St.  Louis,  Mo.  Washington,  April  23.  1864. 

A  lady — Mrs.  Ward,  sister  of  the  late  John  M.  Weimer — is  here, 
saying  she  is  banished  from  St.  Louis,  her  home,  and  asking  to  be 
allowed  to  return  on  taking  the  oath  and  giving  bond.  It  is  ex- 
clusively with  you  to  decide;  but  I  will  thank  you  to  examine  the 
case;  and  shall  be  glad  if  you  find  it  consistent  with  your  views  to 
oblige  her.  A.  LINCOLN 

[310] 


APRIL      23,      1864 

1ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  36.  Rosecrans  tele- 
graphed his  reply  on  April  24:  "Mrs.  Wards  case  is  a  very  bad  one — she  was 
banished  East  of  Ills,  North  of  the  Ohio,  which  should  have  kept  her  from 
Washn.  when  it  was  rumored  that  there  [was]  a  possibility  of  Provost  Marshal 
Brohears  [James  A.  Broadhead]  yielding  to  pressure  &  rescinding  the  order  the 
union  aid  society  waited  on  him  by  committee  with  resolutions  of  remonstrance 
I  think  the  order  should  stand."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States:  April  23,  1864 

I  transmit  herewith  a  report  from  the  Secretary  of  War,  in  an- 
swer to  the  Resolutions  passed  by  the  Senate  in  Executive  session 
on  the  14th.  and  i8th.  of  April,  1864.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington, 
April  23d,  1864. 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  a8B  A4.  Stanton's  report  of  April  22,  1864,  is  as 
follows:  "In  answer  to  the  Senate  resolutions  of  April  14th  and  April  i8th,  I 
have  the  honor  to  state  that  the  nominations  of  Colonel  Hiram  Burnham, 
Colonel  Edward  M.  McCook,  Colonel  Lewis  A.  Grant,  and  Colonel  Edward 
Hatch  are  not  either  of  them  made  to  fill  any  vacancy  in  the  proper  sense  of 
that  term.  They  are  not  made  to  fill  a  command  vacated  by  any  other  general, 
but  are  independent  nominations,  and  if  confirmed  the  officers  will  be  assigned 
to  such  command  as  the  General  commanding  may  deem  proper.  But  in  conse- 
quence of  the  resignations  of  Generals  [Stephen]  Miller,  [Jeremiah  T.]  Boyle, 
and  [John]  Beatty,  and  the  death  of  General  [Stephen  G.]  Champlin,  their  con- 
firmations will  be  within  the  number  of  brigadiers  allowed  by  law."  (Execu- 
tive Journal,  XIII,  501).  The  appointments  were  confirmed  by  the  Senate  on 
April  27,  1864. 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives.  April  23,  1864 

I  transmit  to  Congress  a  copy  of  a  note  of  the  igth.  instant  from 
Lord  Lyons  to  the  Secretary  of  State,  on  the  subject  of  two  British 
naval  officers  who  recently  received  medical  treatment  at  the  Naval 
Hospital    at    Norfolk.    The    expediency    of    authorizing    Surgeon 
Solomon  Sharp  to  accept  the  piece  of  plate  to  which  the  note  refers, 
as  an  acknowledgement  of  his  services,  is  submitted  to  your  con- 
sideration. ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 
Washington, 
asd,  April,  1864. 

1  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  75.  Lord  Lyons'  note  of 
April  19,  1864,  expressed  his  government's  thanks  for  kindness  in  affording  to 
"Lieutenant  Cardale  and  Sub  Lieutenant  Dodsworth  of  her  Majesty's  ship 
Greyhound"  during  their  illness  the  comforts  and  conveniences  of  the  U.S. 
hospital  at  Norfolk,  Virginia.  Senator  Summer's  joint  resolution  authorizing 
Surgeon  Sharp  to  accept  the  piece  of  plate  was  approved  on  June  7,  1864. 

[311] 


To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Washington,  April  23,  1864. 

My  Dear  Sir:  According  to  our  understanding  with  Major  Gen 
eral  Frank  P.  Blair,  at  the  time  he  took  his  seat  in  Congress  las- 
winter,  he  now  asks  to  withdraw  his  resignation  as  major  general 
then  tendered,  and  be  sent  to  the  field.  Let  this  be  done.  Let  ttu 
order  sending  him  be  such  as  shown  me  to-day  by  the  Adjutan 
General,  only  dropping  from  it  the  names  of  Maguire  and  Tomp 
kins.  Yours,  truly,  A.  LINCOLN. 

Hon.  Secretary  of  War. 

1  Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  House  Executive  Document  No.  8c 
pp.  6-7.  See  Lincoln's  letter  to  Grant,  March  15,  and  endorsement  to  Stanton 
April  21,  supra.  On  April  23  Blair  wrote  Stanton,  "I  respectfully  request  t< 
•withdraw  my  resignation  as  major  general  of  the  United  States  volunteers 
tendered  on  the  12th  day  of  January,  1864."  (Ibid.}.  On  the  same  day  AGC 
General  Orders  No.  178  assigned  Blair  to  command  the  Seventeenth  Arm; 
Corps  and  assigned  Captain  Andrew  J.  Alexander  to  be  his  assistant  adjutan 
general  with  rank  of  lieutenant  colonel. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

The  foregoing  proposition  of  the  Governors  is  accepted,  and  th< 
Secretary  of  War  is  directed  to  carry  it  into  execution. 

April  23.  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  NN.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  a  memorandum  from  Stan 
ton,  April  22,  1864,  accompanied  by  a  letter  from  the  governors  and  a  telegrar 
from  General  Grant,  as  follows: 

"An  estimate  has  been  made  of  the  probable  expense  of  the  force  mentione 
in  the  foregoing  proposition  and  it  is  believed  that  its  cost  to  the  United  State 
will  amount  to  $25,000,000  The  views  of  General  Grant  are  indicated  in  th 
telegram  a  copy  of  which  is  annexed  and  which  is  a  response  to  my  enquiry  a 
to  whether  he  would  desire  the  acceptance  of  100  ooo  men  as  at  first  propose 
by  the  Governors.  In  view  of  the  importance  of  the  ensuing  campaign  and  th 
judgment  of  General  Grant  that  the  troops  offered  may  be  of  'vast  importance 
I  am  in  favor  of  accepting  the  offer.  The  present  estimates  are  inadequate  t 
meet  the  expense  and  additional  appropriation  will  be  required." 
"To  the  President  Washington  City, 

of  the  United  States:  April  2ist.  1864. 

"I.  The  Governors  of  Ohio,  Indiana,  Illinois,  Iowa,  and  Wisconsin  offer  t 
the  President  infantry  troops  for  the  approaching  campaign,  as  follows 
Ohio  30,000 

Indiana  20,000 

Illinois  20,000 

Iowa  10,000 

Wisconsin  5,000 

"II.  The  term  of  service  to  be  one  hundred  days,  reckoning  from  the  da1 

of  muster  into  the  service  of  the  United  States,  unless  sooner  dischargee 

"III.  The  troops  to  be  mustered  into  the  service  of  the  United  States  by  reg 

ments,  when  the  regiments  are  filled  up,  according  to  regulations,  1 

[312] 


APRIL      25,      1864 

the  minimtun  strength — the  regiments  to  be  organized  according  to  the 
regulations  of  the  War  Department.  The  whole  number  to  be  furnished 
within  twenty  days  from  date  of  notice  of  the  acceptance  of  tTrig  propo- 
sition. 

"IV.  The  troops  to  be  clothed,  armed,  equipped,  subsisted,  transported,  and 
paid  as  other  United  States  infantry  volunteers,  and  to  serve  in  fortifi- 
cations, or  wherever  their  services  may  be  required,  within  or  without 
their  respective  States. 
"V.  No  bounty  to  be  paid  the  troops,  nor  the  service  charged  or  credited  on 

any  draft. 

"VI.  The  draft  for  three  years'  service  to  go  on  in  any  State  or  district 
where  the  quota  is  not  filled  up;  but  if  any  officer  or  soldier  in  this 
special  service  should  be  drafted,  he  shall  be  credited  for  the  service 
rendered. 

"Jno  Brough  W.  M.  Stone 

Gov.  of  Ohio  Gov.  Iowa 

"O.  P.  Morton  James  T.  Lewis 

Gov  Ind.  Gov  Wis" 

"Rich.  Yates 
Gov.  Ills 

"Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 
"Cipher.  War  Department. 

"The  following  Telegram  received  at  Washington,  7  P.M.  Apl.  2ist.   1864 

"Hon.  Edwin  M.  Stanton  From  H'd.  Qrs.  Culpepper. 

"Secretary  of  War.  Dated  April  2ist.  1864. 

"As  a  rule  I  would  oppose  receiving  men  for  a  short  term,  but  if  100,000  men 
can  be  raised  in  the  time  proposed  by  the  Governors  of  Ohio,  Indiana,  Illinois 
and  Iowa,  they  might  come  at  such  a  crisis  as  to  be  of  vast  importance. 

"I  would  not  recommend  accepting  them  in  lieu  of  quotas  now  due  on  any 
previous  calls  for  three  years  troops,  otherwise  I  would. 

"(Signed)   U.  S.  Grant 
Lt.  Gen." 

To  John  P.  Gray1 

Dr.  John  P  Gray.  Executive  Mansion, 

Utica,  New  York.  Washington,  April  25,  1864. 

Sir,  Private  Lorenzo  Stewart,  14th  regiment  New  York  Volun- 
teer Artillery,  is  in  military  custody  at  Elmira,  New  York,  having 
been,  by  a  military  court,  tried  for  murder,  and  sentenced  to 
death,  his  execution  awaiting  the  order  of  the  President  of  the 
United  States.  The  record  is  before  me;  and  a  question  is  made  as 
to  the  sanity  of  the  accused.  You  will  please  proceed  to  Elmira, 
New  York,  and  take  in  writing,  all  evidence  which  may  be  offered 
on  behalf  of  Private  Stewart,  and  against  him,  and  any,  in  addi- 
tion, which  you  may  find  within  your  reach,  and  deem  pertinent; 
all  said  evidence  to  be  directed  to  the  question  of  Private  Stewart's 
sanity  or  insanity,  and  not  to  any  other  question;  you  to  preside, 
with  power  to  exclude  evidence  which  shall  appear  to  you  clearly 
not  pertinent  to  the  question. 

[313] 


APRIL     25,      1864 

When  the  taking  of  the  evidence  shall  be  closed,  you  will  report 
the  same  to  me,  together  with  your  own  conclusions  as  to  Private 
Stewart's  sanity,  both  at  the  time  of  the  homocide,2  and  at  the  time 
of  your  examination.  On  reaching  Elmira,  you  will  present  this 
letter  to  the  officer  then  commanding  at  that  Post,  and  deliver  to 
him  a  copy  of  the  same,  upon  which  he  is  hereby  directed  to  notify 
Clinton  Rice,  Esqr.  and  F.  B.  Swift,  Esqr.,  No.  200  Broadway,  New 
York,  of  the  same;  to  designate  some  suitable  person  in  his  com- 
mand to  appear  for  the  Government  as  Judge  Advocate,  or  Prose- 
cuting Attorney:  to  provide  for  the  attendance  of  all  such  witnesses 
before  you  as  may  be  desired  by  either  party,  or  by  yourself,  and 
who  may  be  within  convenient  reach  of  you;  to  furnish  you  a  suit- 
able place,  or  places,  for  conducting  the  examination;  and  to  render 
you  such  other  reasonable  assistance  in  the  premises  as  you  may 
require.  If  you  deem  it  proper  you  will  examine  Private  Stewart 
personally,  and  you  may,  in  your  discretion,  require  him  to  be 
present  during  the  whole,  or  any  part,  of  the  taking  of  the  evi- 
dence. The  military  are  hereby  charged  to  see  that  an  escape  does 
not  occur.  Yours  Very  Truly,  A.  LINCOLN 

1  LS,  IHi.  See  Lincoln  to  Holt,  March  7,  supra. 

2  Lincoln  deleted  "murder"  'and  substituted  "homocide." 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

If  this  Petition  is  true,  as  it  probably  is,  these  men  should  be  par- 
doned. Can  the  J.A.G.  throw  any  light  upon  it?          A.  LINCOLN 
April  25.  1864 

1  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  LL  1523.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  letter  from  Salmon  E  Chase,  April  21,  1864,  calling 
attention  to  the  petition  of  Major  Chambers  Baird  and  citizens  of  Ripley,  Ohio, 
concerning  hardships  of  enlisted  men  and  misconduct  of  officers — with  particular 
reference  to  the  cases  of  Privates  Calvin  P.  Shaw,  John  Steele,  Lucian  Stevens, 
and  Henry  Washburn,  Second  Ohio  Heavy  Artillery,  sentenced  to  imprisonment 
for  mutiny.  Holt  left  the  question  to  the  president.  On  August  16,  Lincoln 
pardoned  Stevens,  but  the  records  do  not  show  pardons  for  the  others. 

To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  War  Department, 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington  City,  April  25,  1864. 

A  Mr.  Corby  brought  you  a  note  from  me  at  the  foot  of  a  peti- 
tion I  believe,  in  the  case  of  Dawson,  to  be  executed  to-day.  The 
record  has  been  examined  here,  and  it  shows  too  strong  a  case  for 
a  pardon  or  commutation,  unless  there  is  something  in  the  poor 
man's  favor  outside  of  the  record,  which  you  on  the  ground  may 

[314] 


APRIL     25,      1864 

know,  but  I  do  not.  My  note  to  you  only  means  that  if  you  know 
of  any  such  thing  rendering  a  suspension  of  the  execution  proper, 
on  your  own  judgment,  you  are  at  liberty  to  suspend  it.  Otherwise 
I  do  not  interfere.  A.  LINCOLN-. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  424.  Chaplain  William  Corby,  Eighty-eighth  New 
York  Volunteers,  telegraphed  Lincoln  on  April  24:  "General  Meade  has  not  the 
official  proceedings  relative  to  the  Court  Martial  of  L  Dawson  who  is  under 
sentence  of  death  to  take  place  25th  instant  therefore  cannot  act  Please  say 
what  will  be  done."  (DLC-RTL) . 

General  Meade  replied  to  Lincoln's  telegram  the  same  day:  "I  duly  received 
your  note  by  Mr  Corby  &  after  examining  the  case  of  Dawson  could  see  noth- 
ing to  justify  my  reccomending  a  mitigation  The  only  point  is  the  fact  that 
he  has  been  awaiting  sentence  for  a  long  period  &  may  have  deluded  himself 
into  the  belief  that  he  would  escape  Unless  you  intervene  he  will  be  exe- 
cuted." (DLC-RTL). 

Order  for  Discharge  of  F.  P.  Beidler1 

April  25,  1864 

Upon  the  personal  application  of  Hon.  W.  R.  Morrison  &  Hon.  F. 
C.  Beaman,2  and  on  the  case  within  stated,  which  I  believe  to  be 
true,  let  F.  P.  Beidler,  within  named  be  discharged. 

April  25.  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1  AES,  owned  by  John  S.  M.  Glidden,  Natick,  Massachusetts.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  a  letter  from  Richard  Yates,  April  24,  1864:  "This  lady 
Mrs.  Beidler  visited  Springfield  to  see  me  in  relation  to  discharge  of  her  hus- 
band, but  not  finding  me  there  has  come  to  Washington.  I  have  no  doubt  after 
hearing  her  case,  that  it  is  one  in  which  the  exception  may  be  made,  and  I  sin- 
cerely hope  that  you  will  grant  the  discharge  of  her  husband.  He  is  a  minister 
of  the  Gospel  and  his  education  &  state  of  health  have  not  been  such  as  to  fit 
him  for  a  soldier's  life."  A  Franklin  Beidler  of  Moweaqua,  Illinois,  Company  E, 
Forty-first  Illinois,  was  mustered  out  August  20,  1864. 

2  Representatives  William  R.  Morrison  of  Illinois  and  Fernando  C.  Beaman  of 
Michigan. 

To  Gideon  Welles1 

Hon.  Sec.  of  Navy  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  April  25,  1864. 

Francis  A.  Hoffmann  our  Lieut.  Governor  of  Illinois,  has  an  ap- 
plication on  file  for  his  son  Francis  to  be  appointed  to  the  Naval 
School,  but  finds  he  is  too  old.  He  therefore  wishes  to  substitute  the 
name  of  a  younger  son — Julius  Hoffmann, — who  is  now  but  sixteen. 
I  wish  this  appointment  made  so  soon  as  it  can  be  consistently  with 
what  I  have  already  said  in  other  cases.  Please  keep  me  reminded 
of  it  Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLINT 

1  ALS-P,  ISLA.  This  letter  is  misdated  "1861"  in  Tracy,  p.  181.  Julius  T.  C. 
Hoffmann  entered  the  Naval  Academy,  September  22,  1864,  but  resigned. 

[315] 


To  John  Williams1 

War  Department 

John  Williams,  Washington  City, 

Springfield,  Ills.  April  25  1864 

Yours  of  the  ±5th.  is  just  received.  Thanks  for  your  kind  remem- 
brance. I  would  accept  your  offer  at  once,  were  it  not  that  I  fear 
there  might  be  some  impropriety  in  it,  though  I  do  not  see  that 
there  would.  I  will  think  of  it  a  while.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  38.  John  Williams,  presi- 
dent of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Springfield,  Illinois,  wrote  Lincoln  on  April 
15,  1864:  "When  I  returned  from  Washington  to  New  York  I  concluded  to  write 
you  asking  if  you  wished  to  invest  $5000  in  the  First  National  Bank  of  Spring- 
field Illinois.  The  stock  holders  would  feel  proud  of  your  association  with  them 
as  one  of  the  share  holders;  If  you  desire  to  become  so  I  will  sell  you  50  shares 
of  my  stock  which  is  paid  up  in  full  in  fact  the  entire  stock  is  paid  up  and  our 
organization  complete  After  writing  the  above  it  occured  to  me  that  possibly 
your  position  as  President  of  the  United  States  might  make  it  improper  for 
you  to  become  a  stock  holder  in  any  of  the  National  Banks  if  so  of  course  you 
will  understand  that  the  offer  is  made  in  all  good  faith  &  without  any  wish  that 
you  should  do  any  thing  that  would  compromise  your  high  position"  (DLC- 
RTL). 


To  John  R.  Woods1 

Executive  Mansion, 
My  Dear  Sir  Washington,  April  25,  1864. 

I  regret  that  I  cannot  be  present  at  the  inauguration  of  your 
Soldiers  Home  this  week.  Accept  my  thanks  for  your  kind  invita- 
tion and  believe  me,  very  truly  Your  Obedient  Servant 

John  R.  Woods  Esq  A. 


1  LS,  owned  by  Donald  A.  Woods,  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin.  John  R.  Woods 
was  secretary  of  the  Illinois  Sanitary  Commission.  Concerning  the  Soldiers' 
Home  project,  see  Lincoln  to  Yates,  February  3,  supra. 


To  George  H.  Thomas1 

Major  General  Thomas  Executive  Mansion, 

Chattanooga,  Tennessee  Washington,  April  26,  1864. 

Suspend  execution  of  death  sentence  of  young  Perry  from  Wis- 
consin condemned  for  sleeping  on  his  post,  until  further  orders,  and 
forward  record  for  examination.  A. 


Maj  Eckert 

Please  send  the  above  dispatch         JITO.  G.  NICOLAY     Priv.  Sec. 

[316] 


APRIL      27,      1864 

1  D,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  39.  This  telegram  was 
written  and  signed  by  Nicolay.  An  undated  draft  of  a  telegram  with  an  explan- 
atory note  from  Senator  James  R.  Doolittle  accounts  for  the  telegram: 

"To  Genl  Thomas          Chattanooga 

"Do  not  execute  sentence  upon  young  Perry  from  Wisconsin  for  sleeping  at 
his  post  until  case  is  reviewed 

"This  young  man  is  but  16  years  old.  I  know  his  father  well  He  consented 
at  last  to  his  son's  enlisting  at  last  j>zc].  He  is  a  fine  boy,  but  overcome  with 
fatigue  and  sleep  has  incurred  the  dreadful  penalty  of  death  Please  telegraph 
Genl  Thomas  to  suspend  execution"  (DLC-RTL). 

No  reply  from  Thomas  has  been  found,  and  "Perry  from  Wisconsin"  has 
not  been  satisfactorily  identified.  The  court-martial  files  contain  an  incomplete 
record  of  Private  Charles  O.  Perry,  Company  B,  Third  Maine  Volunteers,  sen- 
tenced to  death  for  sleeping  on  post,  but  it  is  uncertain  that  this  is  the  same 
soldier  (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  NN  1355). 


Endorsement  Concerning  Herman  Huidekoper1 

April  27,  1864 

I  know  nothing  of  the  young  man  within  named,  except  by 
hearsay,  which  is  all  in  his  favor.  His  brother  Lt-Col.  Huidekoper, 
who  lost  an  arm  at  Gettysburg,  I  do  know,  and  for  his  sake  I  would 
be  very  glad  for  the  advancement  of  the  young  man. 

April  27,  1864.  A.  LINCOLN 

1  Henry  S.  Huidekoper,  Personal  Notes  and  Reminiscences  of  Lincoln  (1896), 
p.  13.  According  to  the  source,  Lincoln  wrote  this  endorsement  on  a  request  pre- 
sented by  Judge  S.  Newton  Pettis  of  Meadville,  Pennsylvania,  that  Herman 
Huidekoper  be  appointed  a  captain  of  colored  troops.  "Through  this  favor  on 
part  of  Mr.  Lincoln,  it  fell  to  the  lot  of  Captain  Huidekoper,  not  yet  of  age,  to 
organize  .  .  .  the  One  Hundred  and  Twenty-seventh  Regiment  U.S.C.T." 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington,  D.C.,  April  27,  1864. 

Your  dispatch  about  Private  Peter  Gilner  received.  Dispose  of 
him  precisely  as  you  would  under  the  recent  order,  if  he  were 
under  sentence  of  death  for  desertion,  and  execution  suspended  by 
me.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Tarbell  (Appendix),  p.  425.  Meade's  despatch  has  not  been  located.  Private 
Peter  Gilner,  Company  F,  Sixty-second  Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  was  sentenced 
to  be  shot  for  neglect  of  duty,  disorderly  conduct,  and  violation  of  Ninth  Article 
of  War.  His  sentence  was  commuted  to  imprisonment  in  Dry  Tortugas,  and  on 
October  19  he  received  a  presidential  pardon  (DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advo- 
cate General,  MM  948).  See  Lincoln  to  Meade,  September  20,  infra. 

[317] 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington,  April  27,  1864. 

John  J.  Stefke  [Siefke],  Company  I,  First  New  Jersey  Cavalry, 
having  a  substitute,  is  ordered  to  be  discharged.  Please  have  him 
sent  here  to  Washington.  A.  LINCOLN. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  425.  Meade  telegraphed  on  the  same  day  that  the 
necessary  orders  for  Siefke's  discharge  had  been  given  (DLC-RTL). 


Memorandum  Concerning  Joseph  L.  Savage1 

[c.  April  27,  1864] 

Presented  by  the  Mayor  of  Washington 

Peter  Force  Thomas  P.  Morgan  Valentine  Blanchard 

John  H.  Simms  B.  F.  Guy.  John  F.  Ennis 

Lewis  Johnson  E.  C.  Dyer  Wm.  E.  Spaulding 

William  Orme  H.  A.  Chadwick  James  Skiwing[?] 

Francis  Mohan  Wm.  O'Brien  R.  C.  Johnson- 

Wm.  B  Todd  James  Kelly  Geo.  Savage 

Geo.  H.  Plant  Patrick  Cowley 

1  AE,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  -written  on  a  letter  from  Charles 
J.  M.  Gwinn,  Baltimore,  April  27,  1864,  asking  release  of  prisoner  Joseph  L. 
Savage,  Navy  contractor. 


To  Isaac  Murphy1 

Governor  Murphy  Office  U.S.  Military  Telegraph, 

Little-Rock,  War  Department, 

Arkansas.  Washington,  D.C.,  April  27.  1864. 

I  am  much  gratified  to  learn  that  you  got  out  so  large  a  vote,  so 
nearly  all  the  right  way,  at  the  late  election;  and  not  less  so,  that 
your  State-Government,  including  the  Legislature,  is  organized, 
and  in  good  working  order.  Whatever  I  can,  I  will  do,  to  protect 
you;  meanwhile  you  must  do  your  utmost  to  protect  yourselves. 
Present  my  greeting  to  all  A 


1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  40.  Governor  Murphy's 
telegram,  sent  April  15  and  received  April  22,  is  as  follows:  "Both  houses  of 
the  Legislature  have  organized  today.  .  .  .  The  vote  for  Constitution  twelve 
thousand  one  hundred  and  seventy  nine  against  it  two  hundred  &  twenty 
six  (226)  For  Govr  Twelve  thousand  four  hundred  &  thirty  We  ask  your 
sympathy  &  aid  The  country  north  &  south  of  the  Arkansas  River  is  full  of 
guerillas  One  (i)  member  killed  coming  here  If  reinforcements  are  not  sent 
soon  or  Gen  Steele  ordered  to  return  we  are  in  great  danger."  (DLC-RTL). 

[318] 


Endorsement1 

April  28,  1864 

I  shall  be  glad  for  the  Regiment  to  be  filled;  and  am  quite  willing 
that  recruits  may  be  obtained  therefor  in  West  Virginia.  .  .  . 

1  Anderson  Galleries  Catalog  2193,  November  15,  1927,  No.  278.  This  frag- 
mentary text  is  described  in  the  source  as  an  autograph  endorsement  signed, 
without  further  identification. 


To  the  House  of  Representatives1 

To  the  House  of  Representatives  April  28,  1864 

In  obedience  to  the  Resolution  of  your  Honorable  body,  a  copy 
of  which  is  herewith  returned,  I  have  the  honor  to  make  the  follow- 
ing brief  statement  which  is  believed  to  contain  the  information 
sought. 

Prior  to,  and  at  the  meeting  of  the  present  Congress,  Robert  C. 
Schenck,  of  Ohio,  and  Frank  P.  Blair,  Jr.  of  Missouri,  members  elect 
thereto,  by  and  with  the  consent  of  the  Senate,  held  commissions 
from  the  Executive,  as  Major  Generals  in  the  Volunteer  Army. 
Gen.  Schenck  tendered  the  resignation  of  his  said  commission  and 
took  his  seat  in  the  House  of  Representatives,  at  the  assembling 
thereof,  upon  the  distinct  verbal  understanding  with  the  Secretary 
of  war  and  the  Executive,  that  he  might,  at  any  time  during  the 
session,  at  his  own  pleasure,  withdraw  said  resignation,  and  re- 
turn to  the  field.  Gen.  Blair  was,  by  temporary  assignment  of  Gen. 
Sherman,  in  command  of  a  corps,  through  the  battles  in  front  of 
Chattanooga,  and  in  the  march  to  the  relief  of  Knoxville,  which 
occurred  in  the  latter  days  of  November,  and  early  days  of  De- 
cember last;  and,  of  course  was  not  present  at  the  assembling  of 
Congress.  When  he  subsequently  arrived  here,  he  sought,  and  was 
allowed,  by  the  Secretary  of  War  and  the  Executive,  the  same  con- 
ditions, and  promise,  as  allowed  and  made  to  Gen.  Schenck.  Gen. 
Schenck  has  not  applied  to  withdraw  his  resignation;  but  when 
Gen,  Grant  was  made  Lieut.  General,  producing  some  change  of 
commanders,  Gen.  Blair  sought  to  be  assigned  to  the  command  of 
a  corps.  This  was  made  known  to  Generals  Grant  and  Sherman 
and  assented  to  by  them,  and  the  particular  corps  for  him  desig- 
nated. This  was  all  arranged  and  understood,  as  now  remembered, 
so  much  as  a  month  ago;  but  the  formal  withdrawal  of  Gen.  Blair's 
resignation,  and  making  the  order  assigning  him  to  the  command 
of  the  corps,  were  not  consummated  at  the  War  Department  until 
last  week — perhaps  on  the  23rd.  of  April,  Inst.  As  a  summary  of 

[319] 


APRIL     2  8,      1864 

the  whole  it  may  be  stated  that  Gen.  Blair  holds  no  military  com- 
mission or  appointment,  other  than  as  herein  stated;  and  that  it  is 
believed  he  is  now  acting  as  a  Major  General  upon  the  assumed 
validity  of  the  commission  herein  stated,  in  connection  with  the 
facts  herein  stated,  and  not  otherwise.  There  are  some  letters, 
notes,  telegrams,  orders,  entries,  and  perhaps  other  documents,  in 
connection  with  this  subject,  which  it  is  believed  would  throw  no 
additional  light  upon  it;  but  which  will  be  cheerfully  furnished, 
if  desired.  ABRAHAM  LIISTCOLN 

April  28.  1864. 

i  ADf,  DLC-RTL;  DS,  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  77.  On 
April  25  Representative  Henry  L.  Dawes  of  Massachusetts  introduced  the  reso- 
lution calling  on  the  president  "to  communicate  to  this  House  whether  the  Hon. 
Francis  P.  Blair,  Jr.,  representing  the  first  congressional  district  of  Missouri  in 
the  Present  House,  now  holds  any  appointment  or  commission  in  the  military 
service  of  the  United  States;  and  if  so,  what  that  appointment  or  commission  is, 
and  when  the  said  Blair  accepted  the  same;  and  whether  he  is  now  acting  under 
the  authority  of  any  such  appointment  or  commission."  See  Lincoln  to  Grant, 
March  15,  and  to  Stanton,  April  21,  supra;  and  the  further  communication  to 
the  House,  May  2,  infra. 


To  Mary  Todd  Lincoln1 

Mrs.  A.  Lincoln  Executive  Mansion, 

Metropolitan  Hotel  Washington, 

New- York.  April  28.  1864. 

The  draft  will  go  to  you.  Tell  Tad  the  goats  and  father  are  very 
well — especially  the  goats.  A.  LINCOLN-. 

1  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  41.  Mrs.  Lincoln  tele- 
graphed on  April  28:  "We  reached  here  in  safety.  Hope  you  are  well.  Please 
send  me  by  mail  to-day  a  check  for  $50  directed  to  me,  care  Mr.  Warren  Le- 
land,  Metropolitan  Hotel,  Tad  says  are  the  goats  well."  (Katherine  Helm, 
Mary,  Wife  of  Lincoln,  p.  239). 


To  George  G.  Meade1 

Major-General  Meade,  Executive  Mansion, 

Army  of  Potomac:  Washington,  April  28,  1864. 

If  Private  George  W.  Sloan,  of  the  Seventy-second  Pennsylvania 
Volunteers,  is  under  sentence  of  death  for  desertion,  suspend  execu- 
tion till  further  order.  A.  LINCOLN. 

iTarbell  (Appendix),  p.  425.  The  roster  of  the  Seventy-second  Pennsylvania 
Volunteers  lists  George  W.  Sloane  as  transferred  to  the  One  Hundred  Eighty- 
third  Pennsylvania  Volunteers  on  July  20,  1864. 

[320] 


To  the  Senate  and  House  of  Representatives1 

To  the  Honorable,  the  Senate,  and  April  28,  1864 

House  of  Representatives, 

I  have  the  honor  to  transmit  herewith  an  Address  to  the  Presi- 
dent of  the  United  States,  and  through  him,  to  both  Houses  of  Con- 
gress, on  the  condition  and  wants  of  the  people  of  East  Tennessee, 
and  asking  their  attention  to  the  necessity  of  some  action  on  the 
part  of  the  Government  for  their  relief — and  which  address  is  pre- 
sented by  a  committee  of  an  organization  called  "The  East  Ten- 
nessee Relief  Association."2 

Deeply  commiserating  the  condition  of  these  most  loyal  and 
suffering  people,  I  am  unprepared  to  make  any  specific  recom- 
mendation for  their  relief.  The  Military  is  doing,  and  will  continue 
to  do  the  best  for  them  within  its  power.  Their  address  repre- 
sents that  the  construction  of  direct  Railroad  communication  be- 
tween Rnoxville  and  Cincinnati,  by  way  of  central  Kentucky  would 
be  of  great  consequence  in  the  present  emergency.  It  may  be  re- 
membered that  in  the  annual  Message  of  December,  1861,  such 
Railroad  construction  was  recommended.  I  now  add  that  with  the 
hearty  concurrence  of  Congress,  I  would  yet  be  pleased  to  construct 
the  road,  both  for  the  relief  of  these  people,  and  for  its  continuing 
military  importance.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

April  28,  1864 

1  ADf,  DLC-Nicolay  Papers;  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  Fa.  A  joint  reso- 
lution reported  from  the  committee  on  military  affairs  by  Representative  Rob- 
ert C.  Schenck  on  May  25  authorized  the  president  to  construct  a  railroad  from 
the  valley  of  the  Ohio  to  East  Tennessee.  It  passed  the  House  on  May  31,  but 
failed  to  pass  the  Senate. 

2  The  address  was  signed  by  William  Heiskell,  William  G.  Brownlow,  John 
Baxter,  O.  P.  Semple,  John  M.  Fleming,  and  Thomas  W.  Hughes. 

To  Whom  It  May  Concern1 

Executive  Mansion,  Washington, 
Whom  It  May  Concern  April  28,  1864. 

Charles  G.  Russell  comes  to  me  voluntarily  saying  he  is  a  private 
in  Co.  B.  in  the  12th  Iowa  Regiment,  and  saying  he  is  apprehensive 
of  being  arrested  and  punished  as  a  deserter.  Now,  on  condition 
that  he  rejoins  his  Regiment,  and  re-enlists  with  it,  and  serves  out 
said  re-enlistment,  or  until  honorably  discharged,  for  any  cause, 
he  is  fully  pardoned  for  said  supposed  desertion.  A.  LINCOLN. 

1  Hertz,  II,  928.  Charles  G.  Russell  wrote  Lincoln  on  April  19,  1864:  "I  am 
...  a  member  of  Company  B  ±2th  Iowa  Inf.  .  .  .  That  reg.  was  .  .  .  engaged 

[321] 


APRIL     29,      1864 

at  Fort  Henry  Donelson  Shiloh  the  latter  place  we  was  taken  prisoners,  retained 
some  two  months  .  .  .  paroled  .  .  .  then  sent  to  Benton  Barracks  St.  Louis. 
.  .  .  Many  of  us  left,  went  home  I  suppose  most  of  them  went  back  I  did 
not  I  went  to  Leavenworth  Kansas.  .  .  .  While  there  I  saw  an  order  in  the 
papers  that  all  Iowa  troops  that  was  paroled  was  exchanged  including  those 
Benton  Barracks  and  that  many  of  them  tired  of  the  ennui  of  camp  life  had 
left.  All  would  be  furnished  with  transportation  from  where  they  happen  to 
be.  I  wrote  to  a  privat  of  company  B  telling  him  to  show  it  to  the  Capt.  ...  I 
waited  some  three  weeks  got  no  answer  then  went  to  Denver  City  Colorado 
Territory  have  been  there  ever  since  up  to  the  26th  day  of  Feb.  Left  for  the 
States.  Stayed  in  Nebraska  a  short  tune  then  came  directly  here  on  purpose 
to  deliver  myself  up  for  a  deserter  I  never  intended  to  stay  away  from  the 
reg.  but  force  of  circumstance  some  time  controls  a  man  when  he  intends  to  do 
differently.  .  .  .  All  I  ask  is  to  return  to  the  reg.  after  having  a  few  days  to 
see  my  friends.  I  would  have  -went  strait  back  to  it  if  it  had  not  been  for  that 
for  I  am  very  anxious  to  see  nay  parents  if  I  had  went  home  before  going  to  the 
reg.  I  probably  have  been  arrested.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Mason  Brayman1 

Gen.  Brayman  Executive  Mansion, 

Cairo,  Ills.  Washington,  April  29,  1864. 

I  am  appealed  to  in  behalf  of  O.  Kellogg,  and  J.  W.  Pryor,  both 
in  prison  at  Cairo.  Please  telegraph  me  what  are  the  charges,  and 
summary  of  evidence  against  them.  A.  LiisrcoLisr 

1ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  42.  Brayman  replied 
on  April  30:  "Orton  Kellog  is  under  arrest  for  furnishing  powder  &  munitions 
of  war  for  being  -within  the  rebel  lines  two  years  &  returning  as  a  spy.  he  -was 
a  citizen  of  Illinois,  his  Attorney  is  in  Washington.  J  W  Ryan  [>zc]  is  not  in 
custody  here."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Joseph  Holt1 

At  the  request  of  Hon.  E.  H.  Rollins,  and  in  consideration  that 

Lieut.  Snell  has  already  suffered  severely,  the  sentence  is  remitted. 

April  29.  1864  A.  LUNTCOLN 

i  AES,  DNA  WR  RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  129.  Lincoln's  en- 
dorsement is  written  on  the  court-martial  record  of  Lieutenant  Jason  D.  Snell, 
Company  K.,  Fourteenth  New  Hampshire  Volunteers,  who  was  dismissed  from 
the  service  for  selling  whisky  to  enlisted  men.  The  roster  of  the  Fourteenth  New 
Hampshire  Volunteers  shows  that  Jason  D.  Snell  died  of  disease  at  Carrollton, 
Louisiana,  on  April  26,  1864. 

To  the  Senate1 

To  the  Senate  of  the  United  States.  April  29,  1864 

In  compliance  with  the  Resolution  of  the  Senate  of  the  2/th.  in- 
stant, requesting  information  in  regard  to  the  condition  of  affairs 
in  the  Territory,  of  Nevada,  I  transmit  a  copy  of  a  letter  of  the 

[322] 


APRIL     30,      1864 

25th.  of  last  month  addressed  to  the  Secretary  of  State  by  James 
W.  Nye,  the  Governor  of  that  Territory.  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

Washington, 

2Qth.  April,  1864. 

l  DS,  DNA  RG  46,  Senate  s8A  Fa.  This  communication  and  enclosure  were 
printed  as  Senate  Executive  Document  No.  41.  Governor  Nye's  report  gives  a 
glowing  account  of  progress  in  Nevada  Territory. 

To  Edwin  M.  Stanton1 

April  29,  1864 

Private  Daniel  P.  Clark  of  igth  Conn.  Vols.  under  sentence  for 
desertion,  suspended  for  action  of  President,  is  fully  pardoned  on 
condition  that  he  enters  and  faithfully  serves  through  a  new  enlist- 
ment of  three  years. 

1  William  D.  Morley  Catalog,  April  28,  1944,  No.  214.  According  to  the 
catalog  description  this  is  the  text  of  an  autograph  letter  signed.  AGO  Special 
Orders  No.  163,  April  30,  1864,  conveyed  Lincoln's  pardon  of  Clark  and  ordered 
that  Clark  be  released  and  returned  to  his  regiment. 

Endorsements  Concerning  Julius  Silversmith1 

April  30,  1864 

I  do  not  personally  know  Mr.  Silversmith  but  Senator  Conness  who 
writes  the  above  is  habitually  careful  not  to  say  what  he  does  not 
know.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  30,  1864 

Not  personally  knowing  Mr.  Silversmith  I  cheerfully  endorse  what 
Governor  Nye  says  of  him.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  30,  1864. 

1  Isaac  Markens,  Lincoln  and  the  Jews  (1909),  p.  55.  According  to  the  source, 
Lincoln's  endorsements  were  written  on  letters  from  Senator  John  Conness  of 
California  and  Governor  James  W.  Nye  of  Nevada  Territory,  introducing  Julius 
Silversmith,  a  metallurgist,  editor  and  proprietor  of  the  Mining  and  Scientific 
Press  of  San  Francisco  (1860-1862)  and  author  of  Practical  Handbook  for 
Miners ,  Metallurgists  and  Assay ers  (1866). 

To  James  R.  Fry1 

Executive  Mansion 
My  Dear  Sir  April  30.  1864 

I  thank  you  heartily  for  the  kind  invitation  conveyed  in  your 
letter  of  the  26th.  and  sincerely  regret  that  I  cannot  make  a  posi- 
tive engagement  to  avail  myself  of  it.  My  time  is  subject  to  such 
constant  and  unexpected  requisitions  that  I  cannot  unreservedly 

[323] 


APRIL     30,      ±864 

accept  any  such  pleasure  as  that  you  offer  me,  at  this  distance  of 
time. 

I  shall  be  most  happy  to  be  present  at  an  entertainment  which 
promises  so  much,  especially  as  it  is  in  aid  of  so  beneficent  a  charity 
as  that  in  which  you  are  interested,  if  my  engagements  next  week 
will  allow  it.  But  I  must  beg  that  you  will  make  no  special  ar- 
rangements in  view  of  my  presence,  as  I  may  be  disappointed.  If  I 
can  come,  I  will  notify  you  as  early  as  possible.  Yours  very  truly 

[A.  LINCOLN.] 

iDf,  DLC-RTL.  The  draft  is  in  John  Hay's  autograph,  without  signature, 
which  is  as  printed  in  NH,  X,  90.  A  telegram  of  the  same  date  from  Nicolay 
to  Fry  reads  "The  President  cannot  promise  to  come.  Will  write  you  today." 
(DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  43).  James  R.  Fry  of  Philadel- 
phia wrote  Lincoln  on  April  26,  1864: 

"You  will  receive,  in  the  course  of  a  few  days,  a  formal  invitation  from  gentle- 
men representing  the  Great  Central  Fair  of  the  Sanitary  Commission,  the  Union 
League  and  other  bodies  of  this  city,  to  come  hither  on  Wednesday  the  4th 
day  of  May  to  attend  the  Grand  Musical  Festival  which  will  inaugurate  the 
Fair.  As  chairman  of  the  committee  having  charge  of  the  Festival,  while  I  ad- 
vise you  of  the  proposed  invitation,  I  solicit  your  attention  to  the  importance  of 
honoring  the  occasion  by  your  acceptance  of  it.  ...  If  you  can  favor  me  with 
an  early  reply  it  will  be  of  moment  to  enable  me  to  send  prompt  invitations. 
.  .  .  P.S.  Other  departments  of  the  Fair  begin  in  June,  but  the  Musical  Festival 
(as  I  state  above)  on  Wednesday  the  4th  of  May."  (DLC-RTL). 

Ulysses  S.  Grant1 

Executive  Mansion  Washington, 
Lieutenant  General  Grant.  April  30,  1864 

Not  expecting  to  see  you  again  before  the  Spring  campaign 
opens,  I  wish  to  express,  in  this  way,  my  entire  satisfaction  with 
what  you  have  done  up  to  this  time,  so  far  as  I  understand  it.  The 
particulars  of  your  plans  I  neither  know,  or  seek  to  know.  You  are 
vigilant  and  self-reliant;  and,  pleased  with  this,  I  wish  not  to  ob- 
trude any  constraints  or  restraints  upon  you.  While  I  am  very 
anxious  that  any  great  disaster,  or  the  capture  of  our  men  in  great 
numbers,  shall  be  avoided,  I  know  these  points  are  less  likely  to 
escape  your  attention  than  they  would  be  mine.  If  there  is  any- 
thing wanting  which  is  within  my  power  to  give,  do  not  fail  to 
let  me  know  it. 

And  now  with  a  brave  Army,  and  a  just  cause,  may  God  sustain 
you.  Yours  very  truly  A.  LINCOLN 

1  ALS,  CSmH.  General  Grant  replied  on  May  i: 

"Your  very  kind  letter  of  yesterday  is  just  received.  The  confidence  you  ex- 
press for  the  future,  and  satisfaction  -with  the  past,  in  my  military  administra- 
tion is  acknowledged  with  pride.  It  will  be  my  earnest  endeavor  that  you,  and 
the  country,  shall  not  be  disappointed. 

[324] 


APRIL      30,      1864 

"From  my  first  entrance  into  the  volunteer  service  of  the  country,  to  the 
present  day,  I  have  never  had  cause  of  complaint,  have  never  expressed  or 
implied  a  complaint,  against  the  Administration,  or  the  Sec.  of  War,  for  throw- 
ing any  embarassment  in  the  way  of  my  vigorously  prossecuting  what  appeared 
to  me  my  duty.  Indeed  since  the  promotion  which  placed  me  in  command 
of  all  the  Armies,  and  in  view  of  the  great  responsibility,  and  importance  of 
success,  I  have  been  astonished  at  the  readiness  with  which  every  thing  asked 
for  has  been  yielded  without  even  an  explaination  being  asked.  Should  my 
success  be  less  than  I  desire,  and  expect,  the  least  I  can  say  is,  the  fault  is  not 
with  you."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Nathan  Kimball1 

Officer  in  Command  at  Executive  Mansion, 

Little  Rock,  Ark.  Washington,  April  30.  1864. 

Please  send  me  the  record  of  trial  for  desertion  of  Thadeus  A. 
Kinsloe  of  Co.  D.  7th.  Missouri  Vol.  Cavalry.  A  LINCOLN 

i  ALS,  DNA  WR  RG  107,  Presidential  Telegrams,  I,  44.  No  reply  has  been 
found.  AGO  Special  Orders  No.  212,  June  18,  1864,  remitted  the  unexecuted 
portion  of  Thaddeus  A.  Kinsloe's  sentence  to  imprisonment  at  hard  labor  for 
the  remainder  of  his  term  of  service. 

Order  for  Exchange  of  H.  H.  Brogden1 

April  30,  1864 

Let  H.  H.  Brogden,  now  in  prison  at  Fort  Delaware,  be  sent  to  Ma- 
jor Mulford,  at  City-Point,  to  be  exchanged  for  any  one  of  same 
rank  held  a  prisoner  by  the  rebels.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  30.  1864 

1  ADS,  DLM.  Sergeant  H.  H.  Brogden  of  the  Confederate  Signal  Corps  was 
captured  on  a  visit  behind  Union  lines  to  see  his  father  who  was  ill  (DNA  WR 
RG  153,  Judge  Advocate  General,  MM  1139).  Major  John  E.  Mulford  was 
Union  agent  for  exchange  of  prisoners. 

Order  for  Pardon  of  Sioux  Indians1 

April  30,  1864 
List  of  Indian  prisoners  now  in  confinement  at  Camp  McClellan 

near  Davenport  Iowa  pardoned  and  to  be  liberated  and  sent  to 

their  families 

Tapeta  Tanka  Wiyaka  Tunkarihuarnani 

Tahohpi  wakan  Kimyan  hiotan  Boyaya 

Wakanhotito  Oye  Muza  lyasamani 

Tate  sica  Cinkpa  tawa  Icawtuze 

Wiyuha  Tunkan  Canholiska          Manikiya 

Tunkan  Oyate  yanka       Wakan  inapedan  alias    Ahotonna 
Pantaninniye  Muza  kiyemani  Maza  adidi 

Contidoka  duta  Kalpantpan  ku  Tate  Ibomdu 

Kimyan  hiyaya  Tahokaye 

[325] 


MAY      1,      1864 

The  persons  named  on  this  list  are  pardoned  and  ordered  to  be  sent 
to  their  families  or  relatives.  A.  LINCOLN 

April  30,  1864 

i  D  and  AES-P,  ISLA.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  in  the  right-hand 
margin  of  the  single  page  containing  the  list.  A  copy  of  the  list  preserved  in 
the  Lincoln  Papers  contains  Lincoln's  endorsement  "Pardoned  to-day,  April  30, 
1864."  (DLC-RTL).  Reverend  Thomas  S.  Williamson,  missionary  to  the  Sioux, 
had  written  to  Lincoln  on  April  27,  assigning  reasons  for  pardoning  the  Sioux 
imprisoned  at  Davenport,  Iowa,  since  November,  1862,  under  sentence  of  death. 
Lincoln  submitted  the  letter  to  William  P.  Dole,  who  answered  on  April  28:  "I 
have  read  the  letter  of  the  Rev.  Mr  'Williamson  to  you  asking  the  pardon  of 
certain  Indians  now  under  the  sentence  of  death  at  Davenport  and  wish  to 
say  .  .  .  that  I  do  not  believe  any  injury  will  accrue  to  the  white  people  if 
you  should  exercise  the  pardoning  power  in  favour  of  a  portion  of  these  people 
and  I  have  so  much  confidence  in  ...  Mr.  Williamson  that  I  have  no  hesi- 
tancy in  uniting  in  his  recommendation  in  favor  of  the  particular  persons  named 
by  him.  .  .  ."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Francis  W.  Kellogg1 

Hon.  F.  W.  Kellogg.  Executive  Mansion, 

My  dear  Sir:  Washington,  May  i  1864. 

I  find  the  card  of  yourself  and  Governor  Blair  on  my  table.  If 
you  and  he  please  I  will  call  and  take  you  riding  at  half  past  3. 
Yours  truly  A.  LINCOLN*. 

1  ALS-F,  ISLA.  Francis  W.  Kellogg  of  Grand  Rapids  was  representative  in 
congress  and  Austin  Blair  was  governor  of  Michigan. 

To  the  California  Delegation  in  Congress1 

California  Delegation  Executive  Mansion, 

in  Congress  —  Washington,  May  2.  1864. 

Will  you  gentlemen  please  take  this  case  off  my  hands?  I  really 
have  no  time  to  acquaint  myself  with  it.  Yours  truly 

A. 


1  ALS,  owned  by  M.  W.  Morrow,  San  Francisco,  California.  No  clue  to  the 
case  has  been  found. 

To  the  House  of  Representatives1 

May  2,  1864 
To  the  honorable  the  House  of  Representatives: 

In  compliance  with  the  request  contained  in  your  resolution  of 
the  agth  ultimo,  a  copy  of  which  resolution  is  herewith  returned,  I 
have  the  honor  to  transmit  the  following: 

[Executive  Document  No.  80  here  prints:  Lincoln  to  Mont- 
gomery Blair,  November  2,  1863  (vide  supra)  ;  Robert  C.  Schenck 
to  Stanton  forwarding  resignation,  November  13,  1863;  Edward 

[326] 


MAY      2,      1864 

D.  Townsend,  November  ai,  1863,  to  Schenck,  accepting  resigna- 
tion; Francis  P.  Blair,  Jr.  to  Lincoln,  January  i,  1864,  "I  hereby 
tender  my  resignation  as  a  major  general  of  the  United  States  Vol- 
unteers"; James  A.  Hardie  to  Blair,  January  12,  1864,  accepting 
resignation;  Lincoln  to  Grant,  re  Blair,  March  15,  1864  (vide 
supra) ;  Grant  to  Lincoln  re  telegram,  March  16,  1864;  Grant  to 
Lincoln  re  telegram,  March  17,  1864;  John  A.  Logan  to  Lincoln, 
asking  to  be  retained  in  Fifteenth  Corps,  March  26,  1864;  Grant  to 
Sherman,  March  30,  1864,  directing  Blair  to  be  assigned  to  Seven- 
teenth Corps;  Grant  to  Halleck,  April  9,  1864,  asking  if  Blair  has 
been  sent  to  Sherman;  Blair  to  Lincoln,  April  20,  1864,  asking  to 
be  assigned  immediately  to  command  of  Seventeenth  Corps,  en- 
dorsed by  Lincoln  to  Stanton,  April  21,  1864  (vide  supra)  ;  Lincoln 
to  Stanton,  April  23,  1864  (vide  supra) ;  Blair  to  Stanton,  April  23, 
1864,  withdrawing  his  resignation  of  January  12,  1864;  AGO 
General  Orders  No.  ±78,  assigning  Blair  to  command  of  Seven- 
teenth Corps.] 

The  foregoing  constitutes  all  sought  by  the  resolution,  so  far  as 
is  remembered,  or  has  been  found  upon  diligent  search. 

May  2.  1864  ABRAHAM  LINCOLN 

1  DS  (incomplete),  DNA  RG  233,  House  Executive  Document  No.  80;  Thirty- 
eighth  Congress,  First  Session,  House  Executive  Document  No.  80.  On  April  29 
the  House  adopted  a  resolution  requesting  copies  of  all  "letters,  notes,  telegrams, 
orders,  entries,  and  other  documents"  referred  to  in  Lincoln's  communication 
of  April  28,  supra. 

To  Stephen  A.  Hurlbut1 

Major  General  Hurlbut.  Executive  Mansion 

My  Dear  Sir.  Washington  May  2d.  1864 

Gen  Farnsworth  has  just  been  reading  to  me  from  your  letter 
to  him  of  the  26th.  ult.  I  snatch  a  moment  to  say  that  my  friend- 
ship and  confidence  for  you  remains  unabated,  but  that  Gen's 
Grant  &  Thomas2  cannot  be  held  to  their  just  responsibilities,  if 
they  are  not  allowed  to  control  in  the  class  of  cases  to  which  yours 
belongs. 

From  one  stand  point  a  court  of  Inquiry  is  most  just,  but  if  your 
case  were  my  own,  I  would  not  allow  Gen's  Grant  and  Sherman 
[to]  be  diverted  by  it  just  now.  Yours  Truly  A  LINCOLN 

1  Copy,  DLC-RTL.  General  John  F.  Farnsworth,  who  had  resigned  his  com- 
mission on  March  4,  1863,  to  take  up  his  duties  as  congressman,  was  pressing 
Hurlbut's  demand  for  a  court  of  inquiry-  On  April  16,  1864,  General  Sherman 
telegraphed  Hurlbut:  "There  has  been  marked  timidity  in  the  management  of 
affairs  since  Forrest  passed  north  of  Memphis.  General  Grant  orders  me  to  re- 
lieve you.  You  will  proceed  to  Cairo  and  take  command  there."  (OR,  I,  XXXII, 
III,38i). 

[327] 


MAY      2,      1864 

On  April  18  Hurlbut  replied:  "Portions  of  your  telegram  are  of  such  a  na- 
ture as  justify  and,  in  fact,  require  that  I  should  demand  a  court  of  inquiry, 
where  all  the  facts  and  circumstances  may  be  developed,  and  your  charge  of 
'marked  timidity'  be  proven  or  disproven.  When  that  shall  have  been  done,  and 
the  responsibility  of  the  late  disasters  fixed  upon  the  proper  parties,  I  shall  do 
myself  the  justice  of  tendering  to  the  President  .  .  .  my  resignation  of  a  com- 
mission which  cannot  be  advantageously  held  by  me  in  subordination  to  officers 
who  entertain  and  express  the  opinions  contained  in  your  dispatch."  (Ibid.,  p. 

405). 

Also  on  April  18  Hurlbut  wrote  Stanton  requesting  a  court  of  inquiry  and 
enclosing  Sherman's  telegram.  On  April  30  Halleck  communicated  the  request 
to  Grant,  and  on  May  2  Grant  declined  to  order  a  court  of  inquiry  (ibid.,  pp. 
405-406) .  2  George  H.  Thomas,  in  command  at  Nashville,  Tennessee. 

Order  Concerning  Alonzo  Sheffield1 

May  2,  1864 

Upon  a  good  man  being  furnished  by  Alonzo  Sheffield,  within 
named,  and  mustered  into  the  service  for  the  term  of  three  years, 
said  Sheffield  is  fully  pardoned  for  any  supposed  desertion. 
May  2,  1864  A.  LINCOLN 

1 AES,  DLC-RTL.  Lincoln's  endorsement  is  written  on  an  affidavit  of  Mary- 
Sheffield,  Brooklyn,  New  York,  April  28,  1864,  that  her  husband  Alonzo 
Sheffield  had  enlisted  in  the  Fifty -first  New  York  Volunteers  on  August  21,  1861, 
while  intoxicated,  that  he  had  left  the  regiment  after  two  months  to  return  to 
his  business  and  had  never  concealed  himself  until  arrested  as  a  deserter  on 
April  i,  1864,  and  that  he  was  the  sole  support  of  his  family.  On  May  16, 
Colonel  Daniel  T.  Van  Buren,  assistant  adjutant  general,  Department  of  the 
East,  enclosed  papers  in  the  case  to  General  John  A.  Dix,  who  forwarded  them 
to  Lincoln  with  the  following  endorsement:  "Respectfully  forwarded  with  the 
request  that  the  attention  of  the  President  .  .  .  may  be  called  to  the  case  for 
the  purpose  of  suggesting  that  his  interposition,  on  the  ex  parte  representations 
of  interested  persons,  in  cases  of  military  crime,  is  almost  always  hazardous.  In 
this  case  the  soldier,  whom  he  ordered  discharged,  while  laboring  under  the 
charge  of  desertion,  deserted  a  second  time;  but  the  substitute  having  been  pro- 
vided, it  was  not  deemed  proper  to  suspend  the  President's  order  &  ask  a  recon- 
sideration. But  it  is  respectfully  suggested  that  in  all  future  cases,  reference  may 
be  made  to  the  Going.  Genl.  of  the  Dept.  for  a  report  before  any  final  action  is 
taken."  (DLC-RTL). 

To  Cabinet  Members1 

Executive  Mansion, 
Sir:  Washington,  May  3,  1864. 

It  is  now  quite  certain  that  a  large  number  of  our  colored 
soldiers,  with  their  white  officers,  were,  by  the  rebel  force,  massa- 
cred after  they  had  surrendered,  at  the  recent  capture  of  Fort-Pil- 
low. So  much  is  known,  though  the  evidence  is  not  yet  quite  ready 
to  be  laid  before  me.  Meanwhile  I  will  thank  you  to  prepare,  and 
give  me  in  writing  your2  opinion  as  to  what  course,  the  govern- 
ment should  take  in  the  case.  Yours  truly  A. 

[328] 


MAY      3,      1864 

l  ADfS,  DLC-RTL.  The  envelope  containing  the  letter  is  endorsed  by  Lincoln 
"Letter  to  each  Member  of  Cabinet,  May  3,  1864."  Individual  letters  sent  to 
the  cabinet  members  are  extant  as  follows:  to  Blair  (DLC-Blair  Papers),  to 
Seward  (DNA  FS  RG  59,  Miscellaneous  Letters),  to  Welles  (owned  by  George 
A.  Ball,  Muncie,  Indiana).  The  lengthy  and  divergent  replies  from  the  cabinet 
members  are  in  the  Lincoln  Papers,  but  limitations  of  space  forbid  adequate 
quotation  and  summary.  A  satisfactory  summary  may  be  found  in  Nicolay  and 
Hay,  Abraham  Lincoln:  A  History,  VI,  478  ff.  All  members  agreed  that  the 
Confederate  government  should  be  called  on  to  avow  or  disavow  the  massacre. 
Seward,  Chase,  Stanton,  and  Welles  agreed  in  advising  that  Confederate  prison- 
ers equal  in  numbers  to  the  Union  troops  massacred  should  be  set  apart  as  hos- 
tages, to  be  executed  if  the  Confederate  government  avowed  the  massacre. 
Usher,  Bates,  and  Blair  advised  no  retaliation  against  innocent  hostages,  but  ad- 
vised that  orders  be  issued  to  commanders  to  execute  the  actual  offenders 
(Forrest  and  any  of  his  command)  if  captured.  Recommendations  of  the  cabinet 
were  not  carried  out,  but  see  further  Lincoln's  instructions  to  Stanton,  May 
17,  infra.  For  the  report  of  the  special  committee  (Senator  Benjamin  F.  Wade 
and  Representative  Daniel  W.  Gooch)  appointed  to  investigate  the  massacre, 
see  House  Committee  Reports  No.  65,  Thirty-eighth  Congress,  First  Session. 

Although  attempts  have  been  made  to  absolve  General  Forrest  and  although 
Forrest's  own  explanation  undertook  to  place  the  blame  on  the  Union  com- 
mander, Major  Lionel  F.  Booth,  for  declining  to  surrender  the  fort  before  it  was 
stormed,  the  truth  contained  in  Forrest's  own  reports  to  Assistant  Adjutant 
General  Thomas  J.  Jack  and  to  General  Leonidas  Polk  on  April  15,  1864,  is 
self-evident.  Testimony  of  survivors  was  that  after  they  had  thrown  down  their 
arms  the  Confederates  shot  most  of  those  who  did  not  jump  into  the  river. 
Forrest's  report  to  Jack  is  as  follows: 

"...  Arrived  there  [Fort  Pillow]  on  the  morning  of  the  12th  and  attacked 
the  place  with  .  .  .  about  1,500  men,  and  after  a  sharp  contest  captured  the 
garrison  and  all  of  its  stores.  A  demand  was  made  for  the  surrender,  which  was 
refused.  The  victory  was  complete,  and  the  loss  of  the  enemy  will  never  be 
known  from  the  fact  that  large  numbers  ran  into  the  river  and  were  shot  and 
drowned.  The  force  was  composed  of  about  500  negroes  and  200  white  soldiers 
(Tennessee  Tories).